All posts by ttsaoadmin

Are you training for the future or the past?

I don’t think anyone would disagree that the world is changing at a fast pace. Technology is driving industries to drastic change, weather situations seem to cause more devastation, and people are constantly on the lookout for surprises outside of their control. While all these things are happening how are we keeping up with training to those coming into the industry in the wake of so many changes?

It is very hard to keep up with the changes happening in the world as they are happening so fast yet the technology may not be there to use yet. After all you can’t start training people to drive space ships if space ships aren’t available to the general public, where would you train them? We are not talking about training for things that you don’t have access to, but if you were to take a look at your training programs are they focused on the future or the past? What type of forward training am I talking about?

The training I am talking about is the near future. For instance in July of 2017 the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) introduced a new electronic inspection which will now be known as a Level VIII Electronic Inspection. This inspection will be conducted by enforcement officers while the truck is rolling and allow CVSA officers to check vehicle registrations, safety status, driver qualifications and more. You can view more about the inspection here. http://cvsa.org/inspections/inspections/all-inspection-levels/. Have you included this type of new inspection information in your current training programs?

Now there may not be anything specific that you can train on for person-on-technologythat type of inspection, but making students aware of this type of inspection method, introducing technology into the classroom as much as possible to get students thinking and aware of new technology are where you should begin. Are you introducing information in many formats including electronic means? Have you polled your students to see how they like to receive information as we move into a new era? A great way to do this is to have a module on the future of trucking where you talk about the new changes coming into the industry and how drivers will handle those changes.

Change is not over and technology will continue to change the way our work is done on the side of enforcement, training, and job processes. The trucking industry in the past has been very reactionary to changes and much of the push back to changes like Electronic Onboard Recorders are because we will lose how we perform our duties now. The truth is that it doesn’t change how we perform the tasks in many cases, but how we track compliance of those tasks. If we introduce these changes early on in training and understand how to perform tasks using technology it will take a lot of backlash away. Much of the problem is perception to the end user. is this being forced onto me and will it affect how I do my job? Take those issues out of the equation and it will help to change the thinking of the end user. Look at your processes and find ways to introduce the future into your programs. It will help everyone be forward thinking about change.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Coincidence or Fact-Is today the most dangerous day of the year for truck drivers?

I was reading a recent article in a trucking magazine that stated October 11th is known as the most dangerous day of the year for truck drivers with an increase of accidents between the hours of 7:00pm – 10:00pm. The same statistic is true for June 7th each year. Tires, brakes, and vehicle issues are mentioned as the main problems. You can read the article by clicking the link https://www.trucknews.com/health-safety/oct-11-historically-dangerous-day-truck-drivers/1003081296/.

Is it coincidence or fact? I am not very superstitious unless of course you count a black cat crossing my path, or I break a mirror for seven years of bad luck, or I don’t wash my hockey jersey while my team is in the playoffs? Then you may say I’m superstitious! My take on the issue is that it is more coincidence than anything else. Two things have me thinking that way. One the statistics are over the last three years which may or may not be long enough for proper assessment. Two of the areas that are mentioned are areas where conditions change very quickly due to the mountains in Nebraska and Colorado.

When you look at the mechanical issues brakes and tires are the main issues and both of those would be problematic in mountainous terrain. Now I am not disputing that these things happened or that they are even true. I just don’t believe that October 11th has anything to do with it.

How can you battle the superstition of October 11? The best way to battle statistics is to be prepared before you start on your trip. When you look at the issues of tires, brakes, and other mechanical Trucks in mountainsissues are the problem at any time of year. Of course doing proper pre-trip inspections is the first place to start. Making sure your vehicle is in good working condition is the best way to ensure minimal problems on the road. The second part of battling these problems is proper training on driving techniques. When you travel to areas like Colorado and start driving through mountainous regions proper driving techniques are key to remaining safe. Improper driving techniques can result in tire blowouts, lack of braking capabilities, and even fatalities. You certainly don’t want to have any of those issues while descending down a mountain.

It statistics like these that are part of the reason for the change in training regulations which happened earlier this year. It now requires that new drivers have Mandatory Entry Level Training to ensure they are properly trained to be on the road handling large trucks. That may or may not include mountain driving depending on the area of the training facility. If you are driving to mountainous areas ensure you have the proper training to do so.

On the other hand if you are superstitious, or are planning on driving through Nebraska or Colorado and will be driving between the hours of 7:00pm and 10:00pm then please take extra care today as it is October 11th at the time this article was posted. If that’s the case today is a good day to take extra time in inspecting your vehicle and revising your driving technique. If you are interested in becoming a truck driver then looking into certified training is the best way to ensure you are safe behind the wheel. A TTSAO certified school is a great way to start, visit www.ttsao.com

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Do you understand the importance of the C.V.O.R.?

It was a beautiful sunny day as I drove down our city streets towards the local Canadian Tire. Oh I didn’t need anything for the house, I consider this famous Canadian store to be a great lunch spot as each one has a permanent hotdog stand outside the front door. Don’t worry the point of this article is not about my lunch. On this particular day my favourite lunch location was different.

As I drove up to the parking lot the first thing I noticed was the activity around the parking lot. The huge parking lot was sectioned off with tents and a flurry of police activity. The roped off area included police vehicles, truck enforcement vehicles, maintenance vehicles, and of course all the vehicles that were pulled over for inspection. That’s right this was a full blown inspection blitz that lasted a whole week.

City Inspection

Once I understood what was going on I could see the hidden particulars. Officers were hiding behind light poles, cruising the area in unmarked patrol cars, and targeting trucks that looked like they had deficiencies. It was publicized to the public each morning by the Police but that didn’t seem to slow down the string of people caught in the check.

As I watched the proceedings while purchasing my lunch I happen to mention to the server that there was lots of attention here today. His reply was, “ The guys here are loving it. They are getting paid for two or three hours while waiting for a repair truck. To them it’s free money!” I wasn’t about to begin educating the hotdog guy about a C.V.O.R. but it certainly wasn’t free money. All I said was, “They don’t understand how this is affecting their licence.”

Many of those trucks pulled into the inspection were smaller companies such as landscape companies, paving companies, and the like. These are the type of companies that have drivers that don’t understand the importance of the C.V.O.R. They are not working in transportation industry the way a normal truck driver is where they are trained on inspections and understand that every violation during an inspection can affect their own C.V.O.R. abstract.

However many drivers that do understand the C.V.O.R. were also included in this inspection blitz. I saw many drivers of dump trucks, cement trucks, and other city operations included in the blitz inspections. This is why it is important for all drivers to do proper inspections of their vehicles each day. Drivers that predominantly do city deliveries often think they are out of sight for inspection facilities because they travel off the highways.

Enforcement units are expanding to local agencies and are more targeted in an effort to minimize incidents on the roads. This is the reason that the Ministry of Transportation in Ontario now require a test be done so that new C.V.O.R. owners understand the inspection process since many of the drivers of these vehicles may not understand how an inspection process like this affects their licence. The best way to truly get your drivers trained properly is through a certified training program. The best place to start is at www.ttsao.com

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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PMTC Announces YLG Trail Membership Offer

For Immediate Release

PMTC Announces YLG Trail Membership Offer

Milton, On: Today the PMTC is announcing a special offer to the young leaders, or future young leaders of the Transportation Industry. “The PMTC believes the Youth are the Future of our Industry, and an age group that we as an industry must do a better job of engaging.” Stated PMTC President Mike Millian.

pmtc-young-leaders-logo

“At the conclusion of our Annual Conference in June, the interest from young people outside of our current membership to get involved was very strong. The YLG Leadership group came to our Board and asked for this special trial membership to reduce the barrier to an introduction to the YLG. Our Board fully supported this at a recent Board meeting, and as such we are now announcing this special offer to the public.”

Membership in the PMTC Young Leaders Group is a bargain at only $110.00 per year. For this fee you will receive many benefits, including an invitation to PMTC Board Meeting and YLG Board Meetings. You will receive member only pricing for Educational Seminars, Networking events, YLG Events, and the soon to be announced YLG “Driven to Lead” Educational Program. You will be on our email distribution list to be notified of any and all upcoming educational and networking events.

Normally to be eligible to become a PMTC YLG Member, your parent company would be required to be a PMTC Principle or Associate Member. To encourage more Youth to become active in our Industry and our Association, we are waiving this requirement for a 1-year term. If you are 40 or under, and involved in the transportation Industry, you are eligible for a 1-year YLG Trial Membership, with out the requirement of your parent company being a member. Once the one-year term is up, your company would then be required to become a PMTC member for you to remain a YLG Member. This gives you one year to become involved, see the value of the PMTC YLG, and the PMTC, before your company having to commit to becoming a full PMTC member.

Contact Vanessa at the PMTC office for more details at info@pmtc.ca., or by calling 905-827-0587. We believe you will see the value in joining our Young Leaders Group and taking advantage of this offer.

 

 

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Women show their strength in trucking

If you believe that women don’t have what it takes to be a force in the trucking industry then you haven’t been to a trucking event lately. There have been a number of events this month showing the force of women in the industry and celebrating that fact. We are seeing more women getting involved in the industry and events that attract families are a great way to show off their strength.

Why now?

Women have always been working in the industry that’s nothing new, but there is now more opportunities, openness, and promotion for women to become part of the industry. Women like to follow women that have gone before them.

When I look at many of the other business groups that I belong to the trend is the same. Women tend to follow women, in fact many of them have set up women only groups that are very successful. I mention this so that you can see the importance of women being role models in an organization and in the field.

At a recent event bringing awareness to breast cancer women were Trucking for a Cure 2017front and centre at the event and it was good for promoting women in the industry. The cause alone is important to all women but they were instrumental in all areas of the event. The event was organized by women, primarily operated by women, and women were the contest leaders in many areas of the event. Possibly the most impressive part of the event was the group photo for women drivers only where they were all decked out in pink safety vests showing their strength to the world and the amount of women involved in trucking.

How does this affect the industry?

We have a huge employment problem in the industry and I think if we can get a number of issues changed in the industry it will be an attractive place for people to work. Right now what we find attractive in the industry are hidden items. Talk to anyone in the industry and many will tell you that they stay in the industry because of the people, the steady work, and the opportunities. Those items aren’t noticeable until you get into the industry and begin to work alongside others already involved. Where the changes have to come are in the attraction for people to the industry. We need to show newcomers what many of us see already so that they can come into the industry and experience those same benefits. Attracting people to the industry means making sure wages are at a respectable place, career opportunities are available for the future, and all genders are treated fairly in the industry. Thank you to women in the industry for stepping up and showing us that the trucking industry has opportunity for everyone.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Trucking with Passion

Trucking is often viewed as a cold industry. The industry is made of up of big heavy machines, a varied group of people, and is one of the largest industries in the country. Much of the technology focus is on reducing incidents and making trucks safer or more aerodynamic. With all that steel and grit how can an industry like trucking have any kind of passion or heart? To those interested in venturing out and taking a look at the real industry of transportation you will find an industry full of passionate people.

When we mention the month of September we often think of kids going back to school and business communities getting back to normal after a long summer spent on vacation with families. In the trucking industry the month of September is a time when we show how passionate we really are as an industry and how important we are to the economy and society.
Let me show you how we do that.

First September is a month that we celebrate drivers with National Trucking Week on both sides of the border. It is held the first two weeks of September and is a time for carriers and those associated with the industry to toot their own horn to the public by promoting the fact that a truck touches most of the products we have in our daily lives. Taking that message to the general public is of great importance as we thank those that drive long miles to get goods on the shelf of your favourite store. Then there is the passion side and their is no shortage of it in transportation.

September is a month when the passion of the industry really shines. It is hard not to see the passion as they are on every roadway in the Province of Ontario among others. Those big machines that look scary on the road are driven by people that have the biggest hearts in the country and a pride for the industry that you won’t find anywhere else. Drivers love their trucks and once you have the opportunity to be around these fabulous machines you will love the trucks too. Convoys are a popular way for the industry to show off their attributes and do good at the same time. In fact great is the word that should be used as drivers have raised thousands of dollars for charities over the years and continue to step up every year. The money is one thing, but it is the joy on the faces of the people involved that really make the difference.

I recently attended an event for the Special Olympics that raised Trucking for a Cureover $70,000 dollars to help special needs athletes compete in their chosen fields. Although the money raised was impressive when you saw the faces of those kids as they rode in the trucks the smiles were ear to ear. That alone keeps these drivers coming back each year and helping the cause. Another cause that has been in the forefront is organizations like Trucking for a Cure that not only raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research but celebrate women in the industry. This convoy has various locations and has been a leader in the industry for raising funds for cancer research. In fact they are having their convoy in Woodstock on September 23rd this year. You can learn more at www.truckingforacure.com .

So if you think the industry is only made up of machines and cold steel you couldn’t be further from the truth. This industry is made up of heart and soul with good people behind the wheel. All you have to do is get out and experience it.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Trucking is Extremely Important for Disaster Relief

It has been a rough month for the Southern States and many parts of the Caribbean. Names like Harvey and Irma are regularly mentioned in the news as these hurricanes have caused devastation throughout the regions. When disasters such as these happen many services are required and the transportation industry usually gets the call.

 

How does the trucking industry get involved?

How involved a company gets involved with this type of operation will depend greatly on how the type of equipment they have, the areas they are authorized for, and the size of the fleet. Some companies may send supplies on their own, but for the most part carriers able to help will be listed with Government agencies as willing to help out in these situations. Many times there will also be a call out to the transportation industry for a certain amount or types of equipment depending on the needs of the situation.

If you think about what is required during disasters different Hurricane-Disastermaterials are required at different times. When the incident happens the basics normally required include water, food, and medical supplies. Once these primary supplies are received then items like clothing and building materials will be required. One of the biggest issues that are noted many times are having items sent that are not required. There have been countless stories of loads of clothing and other items being sent to an area and the loads have to be trashed because it is not what people required at the time or there was no way to handle the freight. Make sure you follow the needs listed by the agency websites or requested instructions so that items required are what will be received on location.

Do drivers get paid for disaster relief?

When you hear politicians dedicating billions of dollars to a situation that money is to cover expenses of rebuilding the region. Price gouging is unethical and illegal in many areas, but that being said many times this is a profitable time for some companies because things have to happen right away. Carriers are paid good rates and usually everything is covered from detention time to miles run and more. While this may seem profitable it isn’t all gravy. There will be extended times away from home and long hours performing the relief efforts. This won’t be an eight hour shift.

Everyone can get involved

The good thing is that no matter how big or small your carrier is they can be involved. There are one truck carriers involved and fleets with thousands of trucks involved. They are all involved in a way that benefits the relief efforts the best. In fact if you look at the latest relief efforts happening in Florida they have people with pick up trucks delivering water and supplies from the local distribution centre to the victims.

So if you want to help out in these situations don’t just show up unannounced. There are lots of logistics to be sorted out. Register, answer the requests required, or list your carrier with the appropriate agencies. Don’t get involved for the money! These are terrible situations with people that have lost everything due to the situation. If you want to help, help from the heart not the wallet.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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It’s National Trucking Week-Thank a Truck Driver

National Trucking Week happens every year in September in North America. In Canada it is from September 3rd to September 9th, and in the United States it is from September 10th to the 17th. For drivers this may be the most important weeks of the year. Company’s will be holding barbecues, giving out awards, and trying to celebrate the drivers as much as possible. Truck stops and other venues will be doing the same thing as drivers roll through their premises conducting their daily duties trying to show their appreciation for what they do. My question is does this go far enough?

If you think about it does a free hotdog go far enough? What does it say from a celebration standpoint? Drivers get a bad rap in our Man-with-blue-truckindustry because many times what is shown on television is the damage caused by a truck in an incident or times when an illegal substance is found on a trailer at the border. Then the trucking industry gets lots of attention from the media, but it’s the wrong kind. I am not saying that truck drivers are perfect and never do anything wrong that would be insane as some do cause problems and make mistakes. If you look at the numbers in a percentage based equation you will see that the number of issues where truck drivers are involved is very low considering the number of drivers on the road. In Canada alone there are over 300,000 drivers on the road and you can add that to the billions of miles added on to the U.S. drivers operating south of the border. Take those numbers and divide them by the number of incidents on the roadways and you will see that incidents are relatively low for the amount of driving being done over our roadways. Divide those by how many of those were caused by some other motorist’s driving mistakes and the number goes even lower.

Many of my industry friends will say the same thing that we are very good at telling people in our industry how good we are, but not the general public. Oh sure let’s keep giving drivers free hotdogs at the truck stop, but maybe we need to take it a step further. What if we made it similar to a National Holiday where we take a day and really show our appreciation.

What if we were to match a Holiday such as Remembrance Day with of course another name. All drivers are given the day off with pay and the media shows what drivers really do for our Country. Maybe we could have a giant convoy or celebration showing the trucks to the general public and allowing them to meet the people that drive them on a regular basis.

When you look at some of the causes that truck drivers show up for year after year you can see all the good we do. Causes like Trucking for a Cure or Truck Convoy for Special Olympics are just a couple that also happen in the month of September. If you can get out and see the important work and help that the trucking community provides. We do a lot of good whether it is helping in areas of disaster or helping out a great cause, truck drivers are there. Let’s give them the respect they deserve because without them we wouldn’t have anything. This week make sure you thank a truck driver, they deserve it.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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3 Tips for a Successful Truck Driving Career

Are you beginning your career as a truck driver and wondering what is the fastest route to success? There are some tips that will help you have a successful career that are very basic and something that everyone can do if they choose to try. I often get people asking what is the shortcut to a successful career? When I tell them the basic points they normally give me a silly grin and usually that means they didn’t get the answer they wanted to hear. They were possibly looking for some tip like if you take this course it will take you to the top of the ladder or if you drive a certain truck it will break down less. The truth is that trucking doesn’t work that way.

The transportation industry is a long term play. Success won’t truck showhappen quickly. Oh sure you will have small wins along the way such as successful loads that you make good money on or you might get a new truck from a company right out of the gate. In reality it will take years to realize how success in the industry will relate to you. That’s because everyone has a different reason for being in the industry and different goals for their careers. Since every career is different this is the best place to start a career plan for success so I am offering you three tips to help you get started.

Tip 1: Research Your Career Options and Set Goals

Step one is the most important, but the one that most people forget to do. Many new drivers haven’t taken the time to think about their career for the long term and write down goals that will define their career. Don’t just think about this year or the next couple of years. When we suggest figuring out what you want people think we are talking about when you want to be home or how many miles you want to run. Think bigger than that and try planning out the direction for your career. What type of work do you like to do? How can you get the most out of your training? What type of money do you want to make? These are the questions you should be asking. Sit down and write out that plan.

Tip 2: Get Quality Training

This step cannot be skipped and some say this reason alone is the reason for the driver shortage. It has been stated that there are many licenced drivers in the industry, but due to non-certified training many of these drivers can’t get jobs which is why on July 2017 Mandatory Entry Level Training came into effect. You have to get quality training to even have the chance to talk with a quality carrier and start your career on the right foot.

Tip 3: Operate Professionally

This tip is one that many new drivers don’t grasp. It is important to operate as professional as possible throughout your career. This includes how you dress, how you act, and the way you do your job. This starts in training with taking good notes, listening and be active with training processes. The important part of working professionally is to improve your career as you go along. Keep improving your training, the way you work, and how you treat others. Keep violations and incidents to a minimum and hold a stable work record. Team that with the goals you have set out in the first tip and it will take you a long way to a successful career.

A successful trucking career is long term endeavor and something that needs to be taken seriously. Talk to anyone that has been in the industry with a successful career and they will tell you that the basics of professionalism will catapult your career with many career options down the road, but you have to prove yourself first.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Truckers help kids get back to school

Truckers help kids get back to school? How do they do that, by dropping them off at the front door? Of course not, well maybe the odd kid, but for the most part you won’t see bobtail rigs driving up to the front door of your public school. Trucking is in the background of every industry and is supporting the kids in the same way. If we were to drop off one kid we would be noticed by everyone and only be helping one child, the one that was dropped off. In trucking we operate in the background and help millions of kids and no one see us.

Truck on highway

If you’re a driver depending on your company’s freight focus you may find you’re extremely busy this time of year hauling into big box stores. You may not even realize that you are helping kids get back to school. You may be just doing your job as you normally do. You may be hauling paper from Northern Massachusetts, brand new pencils from the factory in New Jersey, or backpacks from Northern California. For truck drivers it is just part of their normal work week bringing supplies from factories to store shelves as they do each and every day. This is all done behind the scenes and the general public just knows that the store shelves remain stocked. In fact this process possibly may have happened over time and has been going on since the Spring.

How does it work? Stores know that August is a time when back to school supplies will be in high demand. They place orders for the supplies months before with the manufacturers. That is when the trucking community gets involved in getting these kids back to school. Products are trucked across North America to distribution centres, stores, and supply centres. The public then goes to the stores and purchases the products required. It is one seamless process that happens every year with most products.

So take a moment when you are out buying back to school supplies and think about who is really behind making sure those store shelves are full of your favourite items. When your child wants that backpack with his favourite superhero on it or your teenager require highlighters in every colour realize that it got to the store shelves some how, by truck.

When your child is heading back to school take a look at what they have, do a little inventory of what you bought from the store. You will find most of it was moved by truck. There are probably few items that weren’t brought by truck drivers, lunch! That was made by Mom.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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