All posts by ttsaoadmin

Do you have what it takes to even get into trucking?

Seventy-five percent of the workforce will be Millennials by 2025 according to a recent article in FleetOwner Magazine. The question is will that solve the driver shortage for the transportation industry? The same article stated that even if we market effectively to those people we still may not be able to solve the shortage and that may be skilled based problem.

We are starting to see the problem rise in the industry now. How Truck on highwaymany people do we have that have commercial drivers licenses yet don’t have jobs? The mentality of get them trained and get them rolling isn’t working as well as it should be. The reason is that some young people don’t possess the basic skills required to reach success in their chosen career. The social skills, passion for a career, and determination to achieve success are keeping back many of the people needed in the industry. A training school can only teach a person so much, the rest is up to the individual.

The article in FleetOwner magazine went on to say that many young people will remain in low paying positions or even unemployed based on their social skills and education. Many have not gone on to post high school education giving them the skills needed for careers in the future. You can read the article here by clicking on the link.

What I took away from the article was the passion for learning piece of this article. In essence we have the people we need but they either don’t want the job or don’t have the basic skills to begin training for the position. At the end of the day that doesn’t solve our driver shortage. In the industry we are starting to see longer programs helping people build up their life skills as well as training them for their desired career. Trucking requires so many life skills for a driver to be successful that training to drive only covers a fraction of what is required to be a professional driver.

When potential drivers are looking at positions with companies in the industry we often focus on whether the carrier will be a good fit for the new driver. Do they want to be gone for a long time or run local? Do they want to haul this type of freight or that type of freight? Those are very important questions, but do we need to look deeper into the person? Should we be asking questions such as what experiences have they had and how did they deal with them? As we know in trucking a driver will experience so many things that require decisions to be made on the spot that focusing on a persons decision making capabilities might be the best place to start when looking for drivers. Remember trucking isn’t just about the trucks, but the person behind the wheel.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

What’s Your Focus for the Show?

Tomorrow is one of the largest indoor truck shows in Ontario. Thousands of people will go through the door and most of the transportation industry will be attending the event either as attendees or as vendors. Since the show only comes to town every other year it is always an event that draws a buzz in the region. With such a large show and so many vendors having a plan for the show is a good idea. Defining what that plan will be may be the hard part and so I hope I can help you here.

The show is broken up into different modules or sections so show truckbreaking it down could be a good system for seeing everything. Walking around aimlessly may help you see everything, but you may not remember what you saw. Creating a plan is the answer to getting the information at the show you need. I have included a sample plan below:

If you are in a training school then you are possibly looking for a carrier to call home. The show will have carriers scattered throughout the show and they also have a recruiting pavilion that will have many carriers in one area. Just showing up with your family may not be the best course of action. You want to do some homework beforehand so that you know who you want to see.

Here is a plan you may want to try:

  • Go to the Show website (www.truckworld.ca) and see what carriers are attending the show.
  • Research the carrier websites and determine which carriers are a fit for your career goals.
  • Create a list of ten carriers that you must see and talk to at the show.
  • Create a list of questions to ask the recruiter and make sure you get the answers you want.
  • Have copies of your resume ready to leave with recruiters or to review at the show.
  • Create an online version of your resume on your phone or tablet that you can email to a recruiter on the spot.
  • Print off a generic business card with your contact information that you can leave with people you meet of interest.
  • Dress neatly, remember first impressions count!
  • Try to attend on a Thursday or Friday which are quieter and will allow you talk with the recruiter.

Even if you are already in the industry such as an owner operator looking for new technology for your truck, making a plan is a good idea. You could focus on the technology vendors at the show knowing who you want to see. Maybe you are a trucking company owner and are interested in purchasing new equipment then you may create a similar plan with manufacturers at the show.

Just remember the focus for going to the show. Are you looking for information on new technology, learning about new equipment systems, or trying to find a new job? Have a purpose and you will get much more out of the show than just aimlessly walking around. I hope to see you at the show and wish you luck in your search. Enjoy!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

There is No Load Worth Your Personal Brand!

We often think of a brand as a company, famous person, or team. In business the subject of branding is very common and is usually thought of in marketing terms to get a business’s name out to the world. The brand I am talking about in this article however is personal brand. What is a personal brand? A personal brand is you, what people think of you, how you act, your work ethic, and at the end of the day what makes you uniquely you. Your personal brand is you and no matter whether you think about your personal brand on a regular basis or don’t even know what one is, you have one! For the most part a personal brand won’t be a problem for most of you as we all make mistakes, have fun in life, and are expected to act a certain way. As long as you keep away from the “really bad or criminal stuff” your personal brand will stand the test of time. So why should you care about your personal brand? You should think of it because it’s hidden for the most part and that’s the danger of it. You never know when it will appear.

In case you have been living in a cave in the transportation industry you should now have heard of the now famous truck driver with the last name of Gill. This person is a prime example of how you can ruin your personal brand through your actions. Gill is a Canadian citizen with a Class A commercial drivers license. If you haven’t heard the story this driver was pulled over in the United States for safety inspections and was placed out of service for log book violations multiple times. He disregarded the Out-of-Service orders and continued down the road. He was reported by other road users to be swerving all over the road and endangering other motorists. He was pulled over again, cited for violations and put out of service. This was repeated four times within a 24 hour period. In fact his truck had been towed to storage facilities on two occasions and he was caught on video removing his truck from the facility without authorization. He is now in Vermont waiting on a Superior Court date in regards to the charges.

Over my 25 year career I have hauled a variety of loads from high Truck on highwaypriced million dollar freight to hot loads that should have been there yesterday and everything in-between. Not one of the loads have I ever had the urge to violate an order by enforcement people for my company or personal gain. Now I admit I am a trustworthy soul and pretty creative in nature, but I guess I don’t possess that criminal element in my mind. I cannot even imagine why a driver would want to push themselves to that level for a load of freight. The only two instances that come to my mind and it hasn’t been reported yet to my knowledge, is that this person was either running drugs with the truck or someone had his family at gunpoint until he delivered that load. Again drugs come to mind! Those are the only two reasons that I can vaguely understand a person going to that level of criminal dedication over a load of freight. Since all the violations reported were logbook related the driver had a time issue connected to the load in my personal opinion.

What did this do to Gill’s personal brand as a driver? He’s done! Whether he beats the charges or not he has been banned from the United States and Canada is deciding at this moment if he is a danger on the road here. Even if they don’t pull his license he won’t get a job with any reputable carrier. We all know if he does drive again he will probably do worse damage or kill someone if he continues on the same course of action. His actions will haunt him for a very long time not only in this industry but where he goes in the future. For what?

Your name is your personal brand and for the most part acting respectably will keep it in tact through the course of your career. What you have to realize is that doing something like Gill did can bring your brand to the forefront and follow you for a long time. Every action needs to be weighed based on importance. At the end of the day it is your decision to make. Don’t ruin your personal brand for a quick buck, a late load, or to get home. It will take a long time to build your brand back after that. If you would like to read the full article on Gill click this link.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an artist, author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

Can a Safety Mindset Make You a Rock Star?

If you are in search of a new position in trucking then having a safety mindset may be the advantage you need. Often I talk about the importance of having leadership skills to put you ahead of the pack in your career and safety would fit into that category. Many students going through training facilities may be presented to with safety in mind, but do they truly understand the importance of taking safety seriously?

One of the largest issues I have come across when in training environments is students trying to memorize systems in order to pass their exams. What happens when you memorize things? Memorization may help you remember information but it also can stop you from recognizing hazards. If you have ever done the test of reading a sentence that is totally spelled wrong, but when you read it you fix the mistakes in your mind and the sentence reads correctly you will understand what I mean. Memorizing safety systems is the same thing. If you memorize an inspection routine like you would a song you begin to go through the motions, possibly missing important safety issues.

A recent article I was reading on wheel separations showing that incidents are on the rise for 2016 mentioned that pre-trip inspections and the torquing processes may be part of the problem. Drivers are required to stop after having a wheel or tire repair to have the torque checked to ensure the wheel has been installed properly and remains fastened. But how many are doing that after a repair? How many companies are supporting the drivers in having that inspection done? I know as a driver many times you are pressured to get the load delivered after a breakdown as it may already be late due to the initial incident. If a repair network has not been established then where does a driver go? Who pays to have the torque checked? All of these questions may cause some companies or drivers to bypass the secondary inspection process.

 

This is why that safety mindset may be the best advantage a driver ttsao truck at sunset largemay have. You don’t need to have the answers, but you need to have the knowledge to ask the questions. If you know that you need to have a secondary inspection done after a wheel repair at least you can ask a question of the company or repair person as to where, when, and how to have the repair checked. So how will a safety mindset help you get that next great job?

Many carriers say that new drivers have trouble with the inspection process on an interview. As mentioned earlier much of that from my opinion is that many are being taught to memorize the process due to time limitations. If a student really learns the importance of the inspection process and why they are conducting that inspection then they should do better inspections. If they want to make sure the vehicle they are driving is safe they will ask the questions and stop for that secondary inspection from a wheel repair. Knowing to ask these questions can make you a Rock Star to a recruiter.

So get that safety mindset from the beginning of your training and keep it throughout. It will make you understand the importance of the driver in keeping our roads safe and will help you look like a Rock Star on the interview front.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an artist, author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

Next TTSAO General Meeting will be March 29th 12-2pm

The next TTSAO General Meeting will be March 29th 12-2pm at:

Tim Horton’s Distribution Centre
950 Southgate Dr, Guelph, ON

Please RSVP as seating is limited. Directions will be emailed to you to access the meeting room.

Before the TTSAO General Meeting will be the PMTC/TTSAO workshop. Seating is also limited – please register for each event separately.

PMTC / TTSAO Seminar
9:00-11:00am registrations: Contact Vanessa Cox at info@pmtc.ca, or at 905-827-0587 to register. Space is limited, so register early to ensure you do not miss out.
$25 for TTSAO or PMTC members, $100 for non-members

PMTC-TTSAO Partner on March 29th Seminar

TTSAO General Meeting
12:00-2:00pm registrations: Contact Sara Fitchett at ttsao@ttsao.com , or at 416-623-5461 to register. Space is limited, so register early to ensure you do not miss out.
Light lunch served
No charge
RSVP date: March 25, 2016

PMTC-TTSAO Partner on March 29th Seminar

Please follow and like us:

Are You Being Held Back By Loved Ones?

Could the same people who love you be holding you back in your career? This concept may seem strange, but it is more common than you might think. The thought came to mind the other day when I was listening to a radio show about careers and business. The guest on the show was talking about his relationship with his father and how when starting his business his father tried to discourage him from going forward. Today this person is a very successful entrepreneur. I was listening and thinking that in the trucking industry this is all too common.

It happens to many of us. We are about to embark on a new career or business venture, have investigated it and have our mind made up to definitely move forward. The excitement builds about the new venture and we begin to tell people such as our family and friends. We assume that our friends and family will be excited about any venture that we attempt and tell them for support and confidence. Then it happens, the frown, the roll of the eyes, and then the comments. We are told something like that industry can’t make you money or you can do better than that!

The truth is that they may be trying to protect us from something that they perceive as a flop or venture that won’t be successful. The real truth is that they may not have the proper information or the experience to make proper judgement on YOUR decision. This same thing happened to me at the beginning of my career in trucking. I was told by a friend that he tried trucking and didn’t make any money so he urged me not to get into the business. I am glad I didn’t listen to him as I have been in the industry for over thirty years. In many cases our family and friends want the best for us, but they may just not have all the information. This is why it is very important that you don’t listen to people that don’t know you or the venture you are about to embark on.

How many potential drivers have been turned away by an employment specialist that doesn’t understand the trucking industry? Not everyone is suited to this industry and I don’t want to paint this fake rosy picture of the industry, it is a hard job! There are many benefits to the industry however that may be just the right fit for the person trying to get started. I have been saying for years be careful who you listen to.

I am certainly not suggesting that you don’t ask your family and friends for advice as they are a great support group, however if they don’t have knowledge on your venture or they offer a negative vibe without knowing all the facts then make sure you talk to someone that has the proper information before making a final decision. You will be glad you did!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an artist, author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

Could a Lack of Education Be An Asset to Your Career?

I know what you’re thinking, how could a lack of education be an asset in anything? I am certainly not suggesting that you don’t get an education, but when starting a new career a lack of education may be the perfect asset. Think about the last time that you attended a course or even gave one if you are an instructor or trainer? You get all different types of students included in the class. I have found many times that the ones who know it all, or at least think they know it all usually stop listening and taking in the information. In the case of the new person as long as they are interested in learning they will often be successful at the end of the course.

In the world of truck driving there are many drivers in the past that did not do well in educational settings or get years of post education but are exceptional drivers. In fact I was one of those drivers and so were many of my friends. I hated school when I was younger and much of that was due to the way the environment was designed for learning. It wasn’t until years later after having found what I was interested in and finding encouraging teachers did I begin to love learning. That encouragement has taken my career and life to new heights. That’s because I had an open mind and was interested in learning whatever topic I was trying to master.

I see similar situations in my training classes. The transportation industry is so complex in routes that a person can take in their career and different from the generic working environment that it puts most students on a level playing field. We have people who are educated and come from other career paths so they listen with an open mind. We have people in class that are not educated, but know they want to drive so they listen with an open mind. The students with a lower education level many times equal the others because of their interest to learn the job.

Of course as an instructor I don’t know the education level of my students unless they tell me, but it is an interesting observation of people. The whole point of this article is two things. One is to never judge people based on their education level because they may surprise you. The second thing is that if you feel you are not highly educated, but interested in learning about a topic or career to give it all you’ve got. You may just be the smartest person in the room.
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an artist, author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

Want to Attract Women? Think Like One?

Yesterday was International Women’s Day and women and men across the world have been celebrating the contributions women make in the world. It’s easy for men to think we can do it all, but the reality is that women make our lives better and add a certain amount of flair. In fact I was so impressed with a class of women that I recently did some presentations to for the trucking industry that I wrote an article about how they might be changing the face of the trucking industry. You can read that article by clicking here if you wish. So if your goal is to attract more women to your team or business how do you do that?

I was listening to one of my regular business shows the other day and the discussion was about hiring women on to your team and how to go about doing that. The discussion focused on the difference between men and women and what attracts them. It was stated that women want more information and will buy from those they trust. On the other hand men will go anywhere that has what they are looking for and purchase it based on the box text. This concept is very true and if you think about comparing how men and women go shopping, it will give you a clear picture of what I am trying to explain. My wife will window shop until she finds the right item, where as I head straight to the item I need and exit the store as fast as possible.

As I listened to the show I got thinking about the transportation industry and the recruiting shortage we face. Many different businesses within the trucking industry are trying to attract women to their teams whether it be a training school or carrier. In the discussion stated above it was mentioned that women prefer to buy from women because they feel more comfortable. I see this in many of the networking groups that I attend where there are many women only events and functions being promoted.

If this is the case then could your advertising be causing you to miss the boat when attracting women? For years an advertisement in the trucking industry meant a picture of a truck and bullet points about pay scale, benefits, and runs available. If you talk to women they probably don’t care about any of those things for the most part. Would it make more sense to have a women in the ad that is on the team, with information on security on the road or home time flexibility?

If you are trying to attract women to your team you may want to ask women already working for you what they think is important to promote for your company. It may just get you the leading edge in attracting the right team members to your team. To all the women in the world Happy Women’s Day, it is nice to see you celebrated as you should be.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an artist, author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:

March 29th Seminar to Offer Insights into Road Check 2015 Results & How to Utilize Driver Mentors in Your Fleet

pmtc logo

The Seminar will be held in Guelph, Ontario, will run from 9am until 11am, and will cover 2 great and diverse topics.

Road check 2015 results and how to prepare for a Roadside Inspection:
Kerri Wirachowsky, the Head of the Enforcement Program Evaluation at the Ministry of Transportation will be on hand to take attendees through the results from Road Check 2015, and will go over the top defects discovered. Officer Wirachowsky will also offer insights into how a fleet and its drivers can be better prepared to ensure a road side inspection goes as smoothly as possible. At the conclusion of the presentation those in attendance will have
an opportunity to pose questions.

Driver Mentors Roundtable:
Stan Campbell from Trucker Radio and Alexis Broadcasting will moderate a panel of prominent fleets and lead a discussion on how best in class fleets utilize driver mentors to enhance their training and on-boarding of new drivers. These fleets will discuss how they select their mentors, what type of training they provide them, and what has and has not worked when it comes to developing and managing their driver mentorship program. If you have a mentor program, or are considering instituting one, this is an opportunity to learn from the experiences of those who have developed their own. The panel will consist of two For-Hire Members of the TTSAO Carrier Group Committee as well as two PMTC Private and Dedicated fleets.
On the For-Hire side we have:
Geoff Topping, Director of Recruiting and Retention, Challenger Motor Freight, Caroline Blais, Recruiting Manager, Kriska Holdings Ltd.
On the Private & Dedicated side we have:
Gerald Carrol, Director, Safety & Compliance, Fortigo Freight Services Inc. Jas Singh, Transportation Manager, TDL Group Corp (Tim Horton’s)

“As promised, the PMTC is continuing to provide and expand its value added educational and networking offerings to its members and partners. This latest seminar, in partnership with the TTSAO, is another great opportunity to come out and learn best practices from award wining fleets” says PMTC President Mike Millian.

“The Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario (TTSAO) appreciates the opportunity to partner with the Private Motor Truck Council of Canada (PMTC) to assist in offering an educational seminar that will benefit private and for hire fleets along with membered schools of the TTSAO.” commented Yvette Lagrois, TTSAO President.

Where: Tim Horton’s Distribution Centre
950 Southgate Dr, Guelph, ON

Time: 9 to 11am
Cost: $25.00 for a PMTC or TTSAO Member, $100.00 for Non Members

How: Contact Vanessa Cox at info@pmtc.ca, or at 905-827-0587 to register. Space is limited, so register early to ensure you do not miss out.

-30-

Please follow and like us: