Category Archives: Opinion

Great company culture is required for success

Have you ever heard the saying “It takes a man and woman to have a baby, but a neighbourhood to raise a child.” The same can be said about a successful trucking career. It takes a person with passion for the job and quality training to get started but a good company culture to raise a successful driver.

We see this all the time in the industry. A student shows interest in becoming a professional truck driver. They enter into a certified training program and pass their test for the licence. If they get employed by a good company with a culture of safety and team work at the beginning of their career they do well and usually have successful careers.

When people don’t get hired by quality companies we see that they are not as successful and often struggle throughout their career as they search for a company that they feel comfortable working for. Just like a baby, early on in your career is when you are the most vulnerable to receiving information and forming good career habits for the future. Getting into a good company is crucial for your success.

Here is what happens when you don’t get hired with a good Gordon Foods Meetingcompany. If you take just any job you end up working with equipment that is not maintained properly, or drivers are encouraged to work outside of the regulations, or aren’t respected by management. A company like this can lower the moral of driver and cause them to question their choice for entering the industry. They focus much of their time on changing carriers looking for that great company culture.

When a driver has completed a quality training course they now have the training requirements to get hired on with a quality carrier. A good carrier can offer additional training, quality equipment, and works within the regulations helping their drivers have successful careers. This allows a driver to enhance their initial training which will help them identify skills and opportunities for the future. These opportunities form the basis of a career that can progress for a long time.

If you are a new driver looking for a carrier to call home investigating the culture of a company is very important. It can be the difference between a successful career and a mediocre one. Look for a company that believes in safety, has quality equipment, and is working to enhance their driver’s careers with opportunities and additional training. It’s your future!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Doing the right thing is about decisions

Did you hear about the story on the news this week about a person that stole a suit for a job interview? This bad story turned good with a good-hearted police officer was on all the news channels the other night, but what is the message that this story sends us?

Apparently the story goes like this. A young person was caught shoplifting in Toronto at a local Walmart. When the police arrived they realized this person was trying to get clothing for a job interview to help change their life around and didn’t know how to go about it. The person was stealing a shirt, tie, and socks for the interview. The police officer on the scene decided not to charge the person, but went in and paid for the items releasing the person with the items. The story was reported to CTV news and went viral on news networks. Here is a link to the story in case you missed it on the news. http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/toronto-police-officer-buys-would-be-thief-the-outfit-he-was-trying-to-steal-1.3536049

Now a suit is not necessarily required for a job in trucking but the circumstances can be translated to any job situation. More important is that truck drivers are making decisions all the time within their daily job functions and having the ability to make proper decisions can make the difference between success and chaos.

I have as big a heart as anyone and truly commend the police officer for making a difficult decision and believing in this person. If the product being stolen was a television set the outcome would have been much different. Looking at this situation as a one off scenario makes it a heart felt story. Here is the problem with the would-be-thief’s decision.

With this story being all over the news every employer will be watching for this person. Breaking the law to show your best foot forward is sugar coating a real problem and removes the factor of trust which is a trait that most employee /employer relationships are based on. There are many places and organizations that help in this area and walking into any clothing charity would have had someone able to point a person in the right direction if they needed the clothing for an interview.

The real question is the next time this person comes up with a challenging decision between right and wrong, how will they go about it? Will they be hoping that the officers or officials showing up in the case of capture will have a soft heart and let them go? If they get away with the action will they think they have the talent to get away with it again in the future? If you remember the news story just a few weeks ago where the truck driver was caught smuggling a full load of people where some of those people died you will realize the importance of being able to make good decisions.

I hope the person in this story takes advantage of the police officer’s kind heart and continues on a life of good, they have been given a pass this time. If there is a next time the circumstances might be quite different. I wish them well.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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How important is the physical truck to your career?

Is the kind of truck you drive an important factor as a driver in your trucking career? The answer to this question will be different for everyone and the importance will range from super important to those that really don’t care. With all the talk about autonomous vehicles you wonder if the driver cares at all?

Depending on where you are in your career and the length of time you have been driving will determine the importance of a truck to you. A truck to many drivers especially those operating in the long haul category will be more important than someone operating in a city delivery operation. A truck to many of us is a home, one that we spend many days, months, and years in doing everything from driving to sleeping and more. It is a home and many of us want it as comfortable as possible.

Then there is the “good looks” machine category. With an industry that is still very much male dominated, cars, trucks, and machines in general are all about looking good. Fancy trucks have been part of the industry from day one and a good looking truck still turns heads and offers a feeling glamour while on the road to this day. Go to any truck show or roll down any highway and you will see trucks that shine and are decked out attracting looks from anyone in the area.

Trucks have been even part of the promotions landscape at many companies and some still operate this way today. The truck you drove with a fleet was a status symbol in the old days. When you started with a fleet you normally would get the older unit in the yard. As the company gained confidence in you they would offer you a nicer truck as drivers moved on or the carrier bought new equipment. After a few years you would be getting new trucks on a regular basis and may even have a say as to what type of options were included. This is when you knew you were at the top of your game. The truck was your promotion as many times increase in pay couldn’t happen. Getting a nicer truck than your colleagues meant that the company valued your performance and recognized you as a professional driver in the fleet.

So the truck has been a very important part of a driver’s career for truck showmany reasons. You may be thinking to yourself that those are nice reasons for caring about a truck but they are not a requirement for safety. You may be correct but let me introduce to you another component, your body! A properly sized comfortable truck can make a huge difference in how your body handles life on the road and how safe you are on the roads.

Many drivers had back problems before they improved the seats over the years making them more comfortable and able to remove the shock from the road through your body. Some drivers have even had leg problems from not being able to adjust the seat properly in smaller cab styles. Comfort plays a huge part in how long someone can drive and how productive they are on the road. Obviously the comfort of a truck is still very important to the driver as Volvo has just announced their VNL series with many new comfort features based on information received from drivers.

So when going to work for carriers take into account the truck. It will be your home, your income generator, and your status in the company. You want it to be safe, comfortable, and look good. It will surprise you how it changes the way you feel and the way you drive when you have a nice looking comfortable truck. Over a 25 year career it can have a factor in lifestyle and health so do take into account the type of equipment of a carrier. The truck is a major factor in your career as a professional driver, take it seriously.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Fast Money is Never Worth the Consequences

Being an owner operator is a serious step that many drivers go into without doing their homework. Once into the world of business it can overwhelm some to the point that they take drastic measures to repair the damage and make things worse. We see it all the time in the industry, a driver buys a truck and becomes a business owner. They now have choices for their load assignments and some start to get picky on what they haul or where they go. They start getting behind on payments or maintenance and get so far behind that they resort to hauling a load that will bring in quick cash with major consequences if caught.

No doubt you heard the tragic story of the driver that was hauling a load of people that was caught after a Walmart employee noticed suspicious activity when the driver went to buy some water. One hundred people were found in the back of a trailer with ten of them now pronounced dead with possibly more as days go on.

The details of this case are just being released so at the time of this Truck on highwayarticle we don’t know the reason that this driver decided to take a load of this magnitude. It has been stated by many enforcement agencies over the years that almost every time someone takes a load such as the one mentioned above it is for financial gain. The truck driver was driving a custom truck that the driver had taken months to buy from a custom truck shop that is also now being investigated about the purchase.

The reason I assume this driver made a wrong decision on how to catch up in financial situation is due to the facts of the story. Professional smugglers don’t buy custom trucks as a truck like that will bring unwanted attention to the driver. The driver has been mentioned as a nice person and spent months going back and forth to buy the truck. That sounds like a lot of work to lose it all hauling illegal goods.

If you are thinking of becoming an owner operator realize it is a big step to going into business. Unfortunately business is an up and down proposition and many get into trouble. There has to be an evaluation to what will change a situation and whether a load is worth taking. This is for the driver to decide based on their own internal judgements. Anything illegal should certainly be off the option table and not something considered to bring finances back in line. The driver in this case assuming the scenario is as mentioned would have been better to declare bankruptcy than to do what he did. He is now looking at years in jail, possibly the death penalty and much more. Any companies associated with him from his lease carrier to the shop that built the truck are all under scrutiny due to his actions. No load is worth that type of action.

You can read the full story here to date at this website. https://www.ksat.com/news/custom-truck-shop-blasted-online-for-selling-semi-truck-to-human-smuggling-suspect-owner-says

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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A look at a trucking career without a plan!

I was recently reading about a driver that was having trouble in his career. He had been bouncing around to different companies and from the information given from this person I believe they were choosing companies based on the wrong criteria in the first place. Most people miss the most critical step to creating a successful plan, the plan!

Do you even know what you want?

John always wanted to drive long haul. He just got his licence and wanted to get going down the road so badly he could taste it. He was advised that he needed to have a plan in place for his career, but not being a planning kind of person John skipped this step. He would find something he said to himself. Planning is a waste of time.

Through a friend John managed to get a job with a small carrier in his local area. At first he was happy even though they paid a lot less than the industry standard. Then they stopped giving him enough work to fill out a week. He heard about another opportunity through another friend and started running team. The team operation ended quickly due to personal issues between John and the other driver.

John then decided to try working for the large carriers that often take new people from the industry but found the training he had was not good enough to qualify for the job. He thought it was just competition from the industry but in fact it was lack of quality training from the non-certified school he attended.

John sat at his kitchen table frustrated. He had been in the industry for just under a year. He had taken two months of training at a school that charged him around $1500.00 and here he was jobless and out of work.

John decided to call a consultant in the industry to find out what his options are. The first thing the consultant did was evaluate where John is now and where he wants to go. He put together a plan and laid it out for John. The plan started with one sentence that had nothing to do with trucking. The sentence was……”What do you want to do?”

Most new drivers I talk with avoid the most basic part of starting a Class photonew career. They don’t want to put the plan in place about how you might get to the end result. Take some time to think about the operation you want to be part of and the type of company you want to work for. If our friend John had put a plan in place and started that at the beginning he would have realized that the training he received did not help his career, but hinder it. He was bouncing around without knowing whether he was improving or ruining career path. Don’t be John, be you with a plan!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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The real reason you shouldn’t just unload and go.

Your dispatch gives you your load heading South and sends you on your way. Just before you get to the door they call you back and tell you they also have your back-haul ready. You take the load and are beaming as you walk back to your truck. Your mind is already planning out your week, where you’re going to stop, when you will arrive, and how long it will take to get to your pick up point. You start making plans in your head to go out with your spouse after the trip because not only will you make good money, but know that you will be back home on Friday night, something that hasn’t happened for a long time.

As you drive your load to the sunny South you start wondering if everything will stay the same. Your normal routine for loads is to call in to dispatch when empty, but you think that if you do they may send you somewhere else changing all the plans you made upon your return. Will they be mad if you don’t call in? Will you be mad if they change your dispatch? You spend the next thousand miles wondering how to handle the situation. You begin to stress yourself out!

It’s a driver’s dream to get their back-haul before they even leave on their outbound trip. You have an idea what you will be picking up, it helps you trip plan for the whole week, and saves time calling dispatch and other issues that often delay drivers. With this in mind many drivers go through the problem suggested in the story above of not wanting to call into dispatch once they have their load. They are afraid that dispatch will change the plans and mess up their whole week. Dispatch has a tendency to do that! So how should you handle this situation?

First congratulate yourself on the fact that you are a reliable driver in the eyes of dispatch that they feel confident enough to give you your back-haulttsao truck at sunset large before leaving on your outbound trip. Many carriers won’t do that because of the variables that come with trucking such breakdowns, delays, and other factors that can change the load plan. They won’t even give a load assignment to drivers that don’t have the reliability that many drivers should have.

If this situation has happened to you then the correct answer is you should call in to your dispatch when empty from your first load to make sure nothing has changed since giving you the load assignment. This allows dispatchers a way to change things should something go wrong with the load plans. A lot can happen during a trip and often it is another driver’s load problems that cause that change. Dispatch may have had everyone planned out for the week and then someone broke down on the highway and was out of commission. Another driver may have been held up at a customer and will now miss their pickup so drivers need to be moved around. Always check in before going for your next load, things may have changed.

Where most drivers go wrong is in thinking that if dispatch changes their return load it is a reflection on them. It is not a reflection on you, but to really understand it you have to put it in perspective. Dispatch’s job is to keep all the trucks moving and your job is to keep your truck moving. By being a team player and checking in at certain points of the trip you are proving reliability, team thinking, and dependability. Things change in trucking on an hourly basis so be a team player and check in even if you have received your outbound load.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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U.S. Data shows safety scores getting worse

As truck drivers we often think that enforcement agencies are out to get us. Regulations keep getting added and drivers seem more frustrated than ever before. We often wonder why the Administrations don’t just leave us alone? As much as we don’t see the reasoning behind increased regulations they aren’t just coming from a point of harassment as many think. In data updated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) shows crashes and injury are increasing over previous years. When you look at the trends for the last three years you will see an increase in crashes for trucks and buses. You can view the report here: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/content/motor-carrier-safety-progress-report-march-31-2017

As much as we are improving in technology, safety programs, and regulations we are still going in the wrong direction when it comes to accidents. This year doesn’t look any better as we are already trending over last year’s numbers and the information only goes until March of this year. This trend is also occurring in Canada based on numbers shown through reports over the year in Ontario.

With the Summer now upon us and people traveling more than anyTruck on highway time of year on the roadways it will be important for all of us to work together to reduce incidents this year. How do we do this? There is no easy solution and all of us will have to work together to make it happen. Each person will have to do their part.

It really comes down to basics especially at this time of year. Here are some points to help you along:

  • Do proper inspections on your vehicle each day
  • Follow hours of service laws
  • Do proper trip planning and have your trip planned out in advance
  • Leave extra time for delays at border points and increased traffic.
  • Drive safely watching for other motorists actions
  • Stay out of blind spots of vehicles
  • Obey road signs and laws
  • Have the correct mindset of professionalism

No matter who you are it is up to you to drive safely. Be the professional that you are meant to be and you will help in the overall trend of moving our crash statistics in the downward direction.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Are we missing the message?

Are we missing the message? The trucking industry has been improving since the the old days of the 80’s in many ways. So it amazes me when I read statistics showing the results of compliance and out of service rates from recent events. With all the technology advancements, regulation changes, and educational resources available we still seem to be failing at the basics each and every time. These stats tell enforcement officers that more work needs to be done and many States and Provinces are stepping up to the plate.

You may or may not know that June has been renamed “Truck engine compartmentInspection Month” for many reasons. We have the annual blitz called Road Check that happens across North America each year. The Ontario Provincial Police have stepped up area inspections and have found a number of issues with vehicles across Ontario and the Michigan Police have reported that 72% of accidents in the State involved trucks. To many these programs may seem like enforcement agencies just increasing efforts to harass drivers. That may be true until you start looking at the charges and that is where things become alarming for me.

In a recent one day blitz in the Province of Ontario by the O.P.P (Ontario Provincial Police) showed not only staggering numbers but as mentioned earlier these charges should have been on the decline for many years now. In a recent article by the CBC News here are some of the statistics reported as a result of the blitz:

  • 700 trucks were inspected on the one day Province wide blitz
  • 127 speeding charges
  • 113 equipment charges
  • 78 seat belt charges
  • 57 charges for following too close
  • 40 distracted driving charges
  • 41 vehicles taken out of service

Information source

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/astonishing-9-of-32-transport-trucks-inspected-in-safety-blitz-get-pulled-from-service-1.4168044

The numbers to me are not as worrisome as the nature of the charges. Most charges are moving violations therefore driver error is the big issue here. With 41 vehicles being taken out of service shows that inspections are still not being completed properly with many drivers. It certainly isn’t that the education and information is not out there, because it is.

Recently in a conversation with a former enforcement officer we had the discussion that we don’t seem to be moving the bar even though the education and technology for the industry has been improving over the years. We need everyone to do their part in making this industry better and that means the front-line drivers. There is no time to start like the present and law enforcement is willing to help. The State of Michigan is launching their summer inspection program targeting commercial transport trucks. The O.P.P is also stepping up efforts on inspections and roadside programs for all drivers as the summer brings increased traffic on our roadways. So lets do our part as professional drivers and drive and act professionally. Our industry needs us.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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4 Tips for battling road rage this summer

Welcome to summer time with cottage travelers going back and forth on a weekly basis to enjoy long weekends. We have visitors from outside of the Province driving through and everyone is out enjoying good weather. According to reports we have one of the busiest highway corridors in North America with the 401 and beats out places like California for the most vehicles in regular traffic conditions. Add long weekends, holiday celebrations, and special country birthday events an it will make for a busy summer.

This mix is the perfect storm for a condition we know as road rage. I know you have heard about road rage, it’s been all the rage! Sorry I had to do that. Road rage has been around for a long time and some people handle it better than others. It can be hard to ignore someone tailgating you or a person cutting you off when lanes merge. It is important to remember that while you may want to take revenge on someone making a stupid move it may escalate the situation to a dangerous level.

Watch any social media channel and you will see multiple videos ttsao truck at sunsetabout road rage. Some are pretty funny like the one on YouTube where a driver is cut off by another car. He noticed that the driver that cut him off had their windows down on the car when they passed. The driver that was cut off noticed a water puddle up ahead and manages to pass the other car and pulls over to the side. As the traffic pulled towards the puddle the driver that had been cut off sped through the puddle sending a wave of water into the window of the car who cut him off. Certainly not suggested, but funny.

Taking things a step further there was another video of truck drivers taking a motorist’s stupid antics into their own hands in Europe. A driver in a car had been purposely slamming on their brakes startling drivers and causing problems on the roadway. Two truck drivers who had been subject to this decided to take measures into their own hands. The two drivers caught up to the vehicle and boxed him in against the guard rail. The drivers got out of their trucks to talk to the car driver and a fight ensued. It was broken up by another driver who stopped to assist. The situation was quickly defused, but could have turned out much worse. There are plenty of other examples on social media and in real life, just watch the news.

Tips to help you deal with road rage.

How do you handle road rage on our busy roadways this summer? Much of road rage has to do with the individual driving and their temperament. Many of us know when something makes us mad and it is up to you to know when your blood is beginning to boil. Here are a few tips to help you get through a busy summer season.

Trip Plan-Trip planning is your best defence in avoiding road rage. If you are planning a trip or heading to the cottage try to leave at odd times. Getting out of a city on a Friday afternoon at 4:00pm can put you right in the thick of traffic. Try to avoid the rush hour traffic if possible.

Leave plenty of time-Everyone is in a hurry these days and when in a hurry is when patience runs thin. Leave extra time to get to your destination and plan stops along the way. It’s better to be early than late and you will feel more relaxed when driving knowing you have plenty of time to get where you have to go.

Have an alternate route-There are many apps available and I still listen to radio stations that offer traffic on a regular basis so that you can see which routes are busier than others. Have an alternate route in mind should traffic be busy on your usual route. In fact taking country roads may offer a more relaxing drive to your destination.

Courtesy and patience is key-The biggest thing to remember is that we are all trying to get to our destination. Be patient and be courteous on the roads it will help fight road rage. It feels good when you do something good for someone else and they may even return the favour.

I hope these tips help you get to your destination safely so that you can enjoy your well deserved time off. Don’t let road rage ruin your weekend.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Trip planning is crucial to surviving over the holiday weekend.

We are approaching a very important holiday weekend that will be sure to make life a struggle for the professional driver. Oh sure Canada Day happens every year, but this year is the 150th birthday celebration so you can bet that It will be much busier than normal. So as a professional driver what do you do, especially if your deliveries take you into large cities like Ottawa or Toronto?

Our traffic patterns change constantly, just jump on the 401 at any city streetpoint of the day to see that. With the special celebrations already beginning in many areas of the Country it can be a challenge to get around. As a driver you will still be required to deliver your load on time and what would be a normal route into the destination may now have changed. How do you continue to deliver on time, avoid road closures and retain your on-time status as a professional driver?

Check your arrival time

The time you have to arrive at your destination is for the load. Depending on your departure time you may not be able to adjust your time but if you can then adjust your time with the customer. What do I mean by that? Let’s assume you are to deliver at 8:00am on July 2nd or 3rd. The chances of driving into your destination in Ottawa with no issues is a dream. Many drivers would normally arrive the night before but with celebrations on the go that may not be an option over the holiday weekend. So when do you arrive? If possible the best time will be between 3:00am and 6:00am and that may require some arrangement ahead of time. You may have to talk with dispatch to change times for pickups and so on to work with your hours of service.

Check your delivery instructions the old fashion way.

The best defence against being held up is basic old school technique, calling on the phone. Calling your delivery customer and find out what the situation will be in their area. They should have a good idea of what roads may be closed for celebrations and where it may be best for you to park. That normal route may not be available at this time.

Ask the company what their hours of operation may be as they may have special closing times over the Holiday. Often a shipper in the United States will have no idea of what days or changes will be happening to a customer in Canada so it is always a good idea to check delivery instructions with a person in the company at your delivery point.

Don’t rely solely on GPS

I am not a fan of GPS units unless you are fairly familiar with the area, but many are. I will offer you a word of caution here, follow the instructions above. Global Positioning Systems may not show road closures, parade routes, or other changes that are required for the celebration weekend. It is always best to call.

Hopefully you will be at home with family and friends over the Holiday weekend and celebrating your Country whether in Canada celebrating its 150th birthday or in the United States celebrating July 4th. Happy Birthday to both Countries. If you aren’t home and are working over that time I hope the tips above will offer ways for you to avoid traffic issues and road closures. An extra step at this point will be the best defence against long delays.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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