Tag Archives: Career Fairs

Is your company treating you right?

I think I’m getting screwed over by my company? This is a statement that I hear from many drivers over the course of my career. Some of those drivers were driving for the same company that I was working with at the time of the statement. If you are getting screwed over as they say, how do you know?

This article came to mind based on a post that I read where a driver who had been driving for four months felt the company wasn’t treating him right and he wanted to switch carriers after that short time. He said he was running 2500-3000 miles per week for about 35 cents per mile and this was a large U.S. carrier. He said the company was deducting things off his cheque to where he is barely making 20% of his pay per month and he is not on a lease program or owner operator situation. This is all I know as the individual didn’t elaborate more than that which is why it makes for a good discussion.

Trailer-back

There are not enough details to know whether this driver is being abused or not by their carrier unless we were to see an income statement, contract, and other personal items such as work history and so on. So we will assume for this discussion that the company is operating above board and treating their drivers fairly. If we break it down this person is a new driver and agreed to the mileage rate when signing on. We also know that the carrier is giving the driver the miles because he is says he is getting 2500-3000 miles per week. The question now becomes how is the driver being screwed over as they say?

How employees feel about their companies can change by the day, I know it did for me when I was driving. One day you are happy to be on the open road with a cool trip to Texas or Florida. The next week the weather sucks, you have unexpected delays, and you’re heading for New York City. That’s the nature of the job and happens to every driver. Normally when drivers are unhappy it is because they are either not getting enough miles, lack of organization from the carrier, they are not going to the destinations that they want to travel to, or the equipment is not in good working order. Those are the main issues for drivers outside of home time.

Our driver in the example above is getting the miles, doesn’t mention equipment issues, home time, or destination choices. The driver mentions they are deducting too much money from their cheque. Is the driver being screwed over or does the driver not understand the contract with the carrier? Here is my take on this story without knowing the details.

With 25 years of experience behind the wheel I have stood in line behind a lot of drivers at the truck stop. Many of those drivers have asked for loans on the company card to buy food while on the road. They used to be called Com-checks which is basically an advance benefit on a fuel program that the company authorizes. Many drivers forget about this loan after a week or so and then wonder why their cheques are so low even though they are running the miles. I believe this is what may have happened to this driver based on assumption and not having any more details. If the driver borrowed some money when he started to get him going the company would deduct it over time as the driver makes income.

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

If you are in a similar situation or feel your carrier is not treating you right before you go switching carriers or begin knocking the company it is best to have a meeting with your operations people and discuss the problem. You may have just forgot about a loan in the past or didn’t understand a deduction that was outlined when signing on. At that point you can make an educated decision with all the facts as to whether you should switch carriers or not? Smart drivers are tracking their trips and income while matching it to their statements. If not how do you know if you are getting screwed over or not, you may just be having a bad trip.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Trucking Offers Flexible Options for a Career

It’s been a sad week of news so far this week with many manufacturing plants announcing closings and changes to their workforce. It is always sad to see people losing their jobs and having to look to either retraining, moving, or searching for new work. General Motors announced the closing of several plants across North America this week and Maple Leaf Foods announced the moving their plant from Toronto to London Ontario. Good for some people bad for others. Those good jobs in manufacturing have been on the decline for decades since our economy began to buy on global scale and that’s what makes trucking such a lucrative and viable option.

Careers these days are not about working at a plant because your family before you worked there. Those were the old ways of thinking where you got a good job and then worked at a company for thirty years. In today’s world working at a company for five years is a major career and the secret to longevity is to keep retraining yourself and improving your knowledge of technology. Those not willing to learn and upgrade will find themselves left behind in a drastically changing world. There was a company that announced up to 800 new positions in the region at the same time of the other closings, all the jobs announced were in technology. Start upgrading!

Technology

We may be surprised today but this has been happening for years. I personally went back to school many years ago to learn some new skills when I wanted to move up in the company I was working with. At that time four drivers in our fleet were in a race for promotion to become supervisor of the fleet, myself included. All had years of experience, good work record, and respect from the team. This was a time however when everything was becoming more computerized and items like expense reports and dispatch services were transferring from paper to computers. As I had returned to school and was upgrading my computer skills where the other candidates had not and that got me the position. This is one of the reasons I am big on self education to this day as it will offer you so many opportunities for the future.

Let’s get back to trucking and the benefits of flexibility. I think the transportation industry may be one of the only industries that can offer you that life-long career due to the many options available. If we take the news of plants closing and jobs going to Mexico that is a terrible thing for workers here, no doubt. For trucking however that will offer many news lanes and an increase in jobs for individuals. If you pursue a job in trucking there are many opportunities in the seat but there will also be other positions required in safety, dispatch, administration, and other services specific to transportation.

TTSAO-School-banner-2018

Making high wages in the manufacturing sector won’t be sustainable for the future even if we want it to be. Labour costs are generally the highest expenses a company can have and will always be looking at that expense when trying to survive in a global economy. Transportation offers flexibility with change and even if products are made outside the Country they will need to be transported into locations for the future.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Career Training Over Job Training

Am I suggesting that you don’t get job training? Of course not everyone needs some type of training on the job and that is normal and expected. What I am suggesting is if you are new to the industry or career that you are looking for that you consider career training as opposed to one specific type of job training. Let me share an example with you.

Bob is looking for a new job as he recently lost his job from a previous employer. He is 45 years old with a wife and two kids and needs something more stable. The industry he was in before has become unstable and he wants something that will offer him steady work. Bob is currently looking at two opportunities both in the transportation industry because he has heard there is steady work. One opportunity is with a company handling administration work in load planning and the other is over the road as a professional truck driver. Bob is eligible for funding assistance for the new career if he takes the driver training, but he is not sure he wants to go out on the road. The real question is which opportunity should he take?

As someone who has been in the industry for many years I often come across people trying to decide on job opportunities similar to this. They have an immediate opportunity for one position but are able to get subsidized training for another option that may take longer to complete but offer more options for the future.

Every decision here will be a personal decision for the person deciding. Personal issues, income availability, and work ambitions all come into play in the decision. If we were to use Bob’s scenario above and assuming Bob had the income to keep him a float for approximately eight weeks. Then the driving position would be the direction I would suggest he go, here is why.

Driver-in-truck

If he takes the first option of the load planning position he would learn about that particular job and it may move him up the career ladder through that carrier or another company with similar positions. Here is the problems I see with this position. You will only be understanding the job from your job focus for the most part. Your career future may be limited due to positions available in the future if something happens to your job. Depending on where your future takes you it may not have the respect of the team below you if you haven’t got a true understanding of the road. Now I am certainly not saying that someone who hasn’t driven before can’t have a solid career in trucking, it just takes more homework.

If Bob takes the option of going through a truck training course he will have more options available for the future. He may not want to drive forever but driving positions are the most positions available now and in the future if someone is looking for steady work. Having a commercial driver’s licence allows for a variety a variety of opportunities from local work to highway operations allowing for more variety on the job depending on the carrier. There are more options for finding the type of work of preference and the income potential is high right from the start. In the training course Bob will learn all aspects of the transportation industry and that will offer a good base of understanding and respect from others in the industry should Bob move off the road at a later date.

TTSAO-School-banner-2018

Looking at your career options farther than your current opportunities can be tough at first but if you think about the big picture you will see that many times the longer the opportunity for access the more opportunities it will produce down the road. Of course that’s just my opinion.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

The Benefits of Hiring a Driver with Military Background

Talk to any recruiter about the importance of finding the right candidate for their team and you will get a whole list of reasons why this is important. Company culture, technical aspects of the job, and independent decision making are all aspects that many team members need to be successful at their jobs. Finding the candidate with all of those qualities requires recruiting personnel to either have a crystal ball or be able to read minds. I know a lot of good recruiters but none with crystal balls or that read minds. There is however ways to help you choose the right team members using past history or experience.

Usually when recruiting personnel are looking into past experience or history of an applicant they are looking for the basics such as training for the job, negatives in performance, and any risky behaviour. How many are looking deeper? How many are looking for that past experience that may be beneficial for the job?

Being a professional truck driver requires a person that can take on knowledge in many different areas, have quick decision making capabilities, and has an eye for safety. Add the mechanical aspect of the job and the day to day issues that all drivers face and you need to find not only a capable person but a superhero. People who have been in the military may just offer that type of experience.

Military-Trucks

In the past I have had those types of people in my classes. I had a driver that was just beginning his career in trucking. He had been in the military but hadn’t driven vehicles as large as a tractor trailer. He went through the training with flying colours because he was used to following instructions. When he was introduced to the dangerous goods part of the course he was a master. It turns out he had been a dangerous goods instructor in the army. In fact his first carrier hired him to help existing employees with their dangerous goods training.

This is a benefit that may not have been discussed prior depending on the recruiting styles and process of the carrier. There are other reasons to look for someone with military experience for your team. Military personnel much like truck drivers are trained in many aspects outside of their normal role in areas such as time management, note taking, dangerous goods, communications, and other items that make driving a successful career. With the security issues we now have on a daily basis who else could be more beneficial to a team than someone experienced in looking for bad people. Many have experience with mechanical items as in basic training you are expected to take a rifle apart and put it back together. Military personnel are used to conducting inspections on equipment and looking for delays or problem-solving.

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

If you are looking for new members for your team then you may want to find someone with military training. It may be the closest thing you have to crystal ball. Speaking of veterans I would like to take a moment to thank those serving in the Military past or present with warm felt thank you for your bravery and courage.

Remember all of our Veterans this November 11th.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Searching for a Job Halloween Style

Trick or Treat-Halloween Carriers

“Trick or Treat” is a saying many people know since childhood. You walk house to house every October 31st holding out your bag almost singing the words wondering what type of candy you will get in your bag, will it be a trick or a treat? You keep collecting candy until your bag is full and then you take it home and review all the contents usually by dumping the whole bag on the floor. The sorting Halloween costumesbegins with what you consider a trick for bad candy to the treats which are your favourites. Then the review officer takes over, usually Mom and goes through the bag to make sure nothing dangerous has been included and gives you the candy you are allowed to eat. This is a process that every kid in North America goes through on Halloween each year.

If something like Halloween can be repeated so that almost every household has the same procedure with candy and is able to weed out the bad and good candy based on taste wouldn’t it be beneficial to take that same procedure and adapt it to your job search. After all it is basically the same thing, you are applying to jobs that you really don’t know if they will be a trick or a treat of a job until you start working there. Your job search would look like this.

Step 1-Your Neighbourhood

Basic criteria for the job search such as location, career goals, interests, equipment, and pay package. This is the same as mapping out the route for your neighbourhood.

Step 2-Trick or Treating

Gather 10 job opportunities that fit the criteria you set out above and put them into a bag or folder if working electronically. Don’t look at any job opportunity details until you have collected all 10 opportunities so that you don’t get caught up in the details of just one. This is the same as trick or treating.

Step 3-Sorting

With a notepad create a summary list and start going through the opportunities collected. Toss any that don’t meet your criteria and put the ones that do on your notepad. You may want to create columns as the goal of the sort is to get a bird’s eye view of the opportunities. Once you have your list sorted and complete you are ready for the next step. This is the same as dumping all of your candy on the floor.

candy

Step 4-Review Officer

Contact and apply to the top 3 best job opportunities on the list. Once those three are exhausted if you still haven’t been hired go to the next three opportunities and so on until you get the best job on your list. This is the same as Mom reviewing the candy to make sure there are no suspicious elements.

If you think about it you have been doing the same system since you were a child. You are just applying it to different types of candy. In this electronic age of course you don’t have to physically go knocking on doors but the idea is the same as going out for Halloween. Get your best business costume on and get out there!

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Do Your Homework When Searching for a Carrier

I have been in this industry for a long time and I am always amazed at some of the issues I hear going on within the industry like the issue many drivers face called “Bus and Dump.” I was looking through some articles on the industry when I came across this article from Fleet Owner Publication on “Bus and Dump” which is a practice some carriers use in the United States to recruit drivers to their team. I have never heard of the practice in Canada, but apparently this is a practice that has been going on for some time in the U.S. So what is “Bus and Dump?”

 

“Bus and Dump” is the practice of hiring drivers through an online application form on a website with a promise to hire, offering them travel arrangements to attend orientation, and then once they arrive making an excuse to turn them away.

You’re the driver and you want to get a new job in the transportation industry. You fill out an online application and get a message or phone call from the recruiter telling you that you have been accepted for the position. The carrier sends you a bus ticket to arrive in orientation at an arranged date and time and you accept. You head out to the location that is often across the Country and are excited to start with a new company. When you arrive the carrier tells you for some reason that you are no longer required and sets you on your way. You now have to find your own way home with no money or accommodations. You can read the actual article by clicking this website link. https://www.fleetowner.com/driver-management/bus-and-dump-drivers-expose-industrys-dirty-practice

depressed-person

How do you protect yourself against the “Bus and Dump” practice?

The first step is to do your homework on the carrier and make sure they are legitimate. There are plenty of jobs available in the industry for the right candidates so there is no reason to go to carriers that are participating in unethical practices. Know who you are applying to and make sure they are a reputable company. You can do this by following the same format of investigation the carrier uses to hire you.

Investigating a Carrier

  • Only apply to carriers through reputable job websites or carrier specific websites
  • Make sure you understand if you are going for a first time interview or have actually been hired.
  • Research the carrier profile and safety record by adding their name to searches on websites like www.fmcsa.dot.gov or Google and review the information about them.
  • Talk to three references about them from drivers or other people in the industry
  • Have a discussion via phone or video with the person hiring you and find out any pertinent information required, such as dress for the job, equipment required, etc.
  • If traveling far from home have a letter of intent to hire from the carrier in writing. This may come in handy should you have to take legal action at a later date.
  • Be honest about any convictions or other information that may cause issues in the hiring process.
  • Have a your own original copies of all documents such as abstracts, licence, and so on should they be altered by someone else in the process
  • Take enough money for accommodations and travel back home if required.
  • Keep in contact with family or friends about your whereabouts and progress.

You can’t stop a carrier from unscrupulous methods of hiring drivers but you don’t have to participate in the practice. This is why many industry professionals caution new students on accepting the first job that comes along. Do your homework, I can’t say that enough! Reputable carriers don’t participate in such practices as “Bus and Dump” and you shouldn’t either.

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

TTSAO Holds June BOD Meeting at PMTC Conference

The TTSAO Board of Directors held their June meeting at the PMTC Conference in Niagara Falls. Here are some pictures from the event.

Photos by Niko Charlambous

About the PMTC

The PMTC is recognized as the voice of private trucking in Canada. We regularly field calls from trade press seeking PMTC opinions on subjects of interest to the trucking industry. PMTC President Mike Millian also has a monthly column in a leading industry magazine to promote the views of private carriers. www.pmtc.ca

 

Please follow and like us:
error

Thinking of changing careers? Now is the time!

Thinking of changing careers?
Now is the time!

Recently the Truck Training School Association of Ontario (TTSAO) had a Hiring Event for those looking at the transportation industry as a viable career choice. The transportation industry is desperately looking for people to fill the seats of trucks and many other positions in the industry. In fact predictions from industry experts is that if we don’t get more people into the industry very soon there may be big consequences and price hikes for items on our store shelves. It has also been reported that the driver shortage is partially responsible for raising the rates in the industry for drivers. So if you were thinking of making that career switch, want to fill that dream of driving on the open road, or are tired of being laid off time after time then transportation may be the place for you?

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

People often look at the transportation industry in different ways and that can scare some off for the wrong reasons. Look at the news and you would think that all truck drivers are out to wreak havoc and mayhem on the roads. If you have had a truck tailgate you then you may think trucks are driven by wild people. Sure we have a few bad apples but for an industry that touches every part of people’s lives on the whole we do pretty well.

Over my 25 year career driving trucks I have seen more good men and women behind the wheel than what the media shows to the public. I have seen dedicated people travel through all kinds of conditions to reach places most people don’t even know exist. Without the drivers there would be no food on the shelves, parts for your car, or building materials for those new homes. Without trucks we would have very few exports as steel and lumber are our most popular exports to the United States and other Countries. So if you don’t think truck driving is an important job think again. Let’s get to the real point because I know very few drivers got into the industry to serve our Country although that’s what they’re doing.

People get into trucking for many reasons but stay because of the people, the work, and the opportunities. If you have ever worked in manufacturing or similar work you know that much of that work can come with layoffs at varying times or can be monotonous work. Transportation offers you some degree of independence, different environments on a daily basis, and the opportunity to meet new people, and see out wonderful Country.

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

At the latest TTSAO Hiring Event there were a large variety of carriers with work from city operations to long haul highway operations. You could get into the bus industry with a carrier like Greyhound, multiple carrier types in the trucking industry, or maintenance opportunities for mechanics and repair professionals.

There have never been so many opportunities in the industry as there are today. Investing in training for your chosen field can offer you a lifetime of opportunities for your career. If you’re not sure how to get started the best way is to contact one of the TTSAO schools listed in your area and meet them to learn more about the industry. If you are ready for a career change there is no time like the present!Find a TTSAO Certified School in your area

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Photos from the TTSAO Hiring Event

The TTSAO held their first Hiring Event last Saturday with a strong turnout from industry. Thank you to all that turned out and here are some pictures from the event.

All the jobs didn’t get taken at this event so check out our Carrier Group and apply today!

TTSAO-Carrier-Group-banner

About the TTSAO

The TTSAO envisions that through the co-operation and joint efforts of all schools involved and the industry itself, specific standards and educational programs can be set for drivers that will not only prove more realistic but much more effective than those currently being put into place by various government agencies.

For more information on the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario please email ttsao@ttsao.com or call 1-866-475-9436 or visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Choosing the Right Job Based on Your Skills

Choosing the Right Job Based on Your Skills

The transportation industry is one of the largest industries in North America. The amount of people employed ranges in the millions and the type of work available fits every skill set. With such a large workforce and with so many different positions available how do you know what type of work is the best for you. Do you choose a job by money, location, type of work, job title, or a host of other criteria? Do you take a position based on hierarchy? All of these questions come to mind for someone new to the industry and unfortunately there is no one answer. If you ask most people already the industry they will tell you, “It depends”. What does that mean?

Girl-on-phone

When I started in the industry I was seventeen years old and didn’t even know what a truck was. My family had never had anything to do with the trucking industry, I didn’t have friends in the industry, I didn’t even know there was an industry. I just needed a job and started working for a company in the moving industry. That was at seventeen and I am now fifty-five years old and my career has more twists and turns than I can count and not one of them was on my goal list or suggested career path. I didn’t talk to a career counselor, I didn’t see where I would end up in the future, I just needed a job.

My career path looks like this; helper carrying furniture onto trucks, furniture driver with a “D” licence, furniture driver with an “A” licence, owner operator, city driver, long haul driver, specialized delivery driver, dispatcher, fleet supervisor, industry columnist, industry cartoonist, industry author, social media expert, transportation consultant, podcast host, television host, and entrepreneur. Every one of those positions have involved the transportation industry and still do to this day. If you look at the path after columnist the other jobs didn’t even exist so there is no way I could have said I was going to be a podcast host. For me the best thing I ever did was just get started in the industry and take opportunities as they appealed to me going through my career and I would suggest the same for most if they have some ambition.

If you are unlike me and prefer not to leave your career to chance there are some things you can do to choose the right position for you. You have to look at three things; the type of work you like to do, the type of work you are good at doing, and the type of training you have acquired.

The type of work you like to do?

The first place to start when looking for a position in the industry is to figure out the type of work you would like to do? Do you like to drive and see the Country? Then a long haul driving job may be good for you? Do you like to talk to people or have a great personality then a recruiting job may be best suited to you? Are you organized and enjoy fast-paced environments then a position as a dispatcher may be your calling? Like to fix things and tinker with machinery then a mechanic job may be best for you? Look at what interests you and start from there when choosing a position.

The type of work you’re good at doing?

The next area to look into is what type of work are you good at doing? Many of us have a natural talent for a certain type of work. Some people are good at administration and others hate it. Some are good at fixing things and others don’t like getting grease on their hands. Think about what you are good at doing and look for jobs that fit those skills.

The type of training you have acquired?

Have you had existing training in a particular area? If so that can be extremely valuable in helping direct you in a certain career. If you have had safety training in the past that may help guide you towards a position in the safety department. Lots of training is available in the industry so past training isn’t a necessity but can be very helpful if you have already achieved a certain skill set.

So if you are looking for a job or investigating a new career then the transportation holds many opportunities. The Truck Training School Association of Ontario (TTSAO) is holding a career fair on May 26th in the Mississauga area. You can learn more about the TTSAO Hiring Event by clicking the link below. Get out there and find the career for you!

Check out the TTSAO Hiring Event

Carrier-Group-Hiring-Event-Banner

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error