Tag Archives: transportation

Ten Four Trainers Joins TTSAO Family

Ten Four Trainers has joined the TTSAO Accredited Schools family offering another school in the Brampton area. You can learn more about Ten Four Trainers through the information below.

Ten Four Trainers
351 Parkhurst Square, Unit 17 Brampton, ON L6T 0C2
Contact: Tariq Mahmud or Noshina Syed
Tel:  905-799-9104 or 416-834-1587
Fax: 905-799-8104
Email: aztrainer@gmail.com  or tenfourtrainers@gmail.com
Website: www.tenfourtrainers.ca

ten four trainers logo

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Limousines are commercial vehicles too

Certainly by now you have heard of the horrific limousine accident that happened last week in New York State killing 20 people including all 18 people in the limousine and two pedestrians that were on location at the time of the incident. This incident happened at a dangerous intersection that recently was ruled off limits for trucks due to the dangerous nature of the roadways that came to a “T” stop off a steep hill. The people inside were all celebrating a birthday event and had hired the limo so they didn’t have to drive and would be safe. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends of the victims. You can read the actual story here if you missed it earlier. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/20-people-killed-vehicle-crash-new-york-state-police-say-n917541. The crash is currently being investigated and details will come out as they are updated.

Often former truck and bus drivers will turn to limousine driving as they wind down their career from driving over the road. This is a great way to earn extra money and can be very lucrative with the right company. The limousine business offers a variety of ways to make money from a single vehicle owner to a large multi-vehicle operator and I often see driveways with five or six limousines parked of different sizes. If this looks lucrative to you then starting a limousine company may be the way to go to create a unique business. What you have to look out for is the fact that you are now starting your own carrier and will now be a commercial vehicle operator.

Depending on the size of the vehicle you may be starting your own bus company that will require commercial vehicle operator’s licence, commercial driver’s licence, insurance, and so on. Operating under those situations will require vehicle inspections, driver training, commercial operating procedures. A class “F” licence is required for ambulances and small limousines and depending on the size of the vehicle other licences like “C” for coach or even “B” licence may be required or suggested.

Coach Limousine

Just because a carrier is small in nature or looked at as outside of trucking it still requires the attention and detail of a larger operation. Vehicle inspections and driver training are extremely important as we investigate the horrific incident in New York State. We have yet to hear about the details as to whether the driver knew the road or the vehicle had an equipment failure. Either way the family of the people in that limousine will be grieving for a long time. Commercial driving needs to be taken seriously from the carrier and the driver, lives are at stake and it doesn’t matter how small or large the operation.

TTSAO-School-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Without Trucks there wouldn’t be a Thanksgiving

As we approach Thanksgiving here in Canada it is always a good time to reflect on what we have and how it got there. With a table full of food, a large turkey waiting to be carved we often take for granted many of the items we have in our daily lives without much thought as to how they reached our table. Nearly 70 percent of all goods are transported by truck with transportation being one of the largest industries in North America. Yet we still seem to get a bad rap from the public.

Much of that bad rap is because the trucking industry operates in the background. We are seen to the public as a problem not a solution. The public sees closed trailers, deadly accidents, and slow moving vehicles. They don’t see the driver unloading in the middle of the night at a dock with 40,000 pounds of a certain product. They don’t see the driver driving all night to get their Amazon delivery to their door the next day. When we do get a chance to talk to the public we are often trying to tell them why we need more drivers or less regulations. We forget to show them the importance for what we do. We need to educate the public on how their goods get to the table, the stores, and into their homes. Do they know that the car they’re driving came from parts that were on more than a dozen trucks at one time and put together at the plant? Do they know that once that car was assembled at the plant that the car was put on another truck to be delivered to the dealership where they were able to sit inside it and take it for a test drive?

Truck on highway

I would love to see a campaign where that was shown all the time. Almost like a message on the back of each truck that says on this truck is the steering wheel for the car that you are holding in your hands. On this truck are the tires that are helping you drive down the road. On this truck are the pillows that you lay your head on each night. On this truck are the potatoes that you will be having for dinner on Thanksgiving. If information like that was everywhere maybe people would start to listen and realize the importance of the truck driver.

We should also be showing the importance of freight on our roadways. Buses have priority on our streets when pulling out into traffic as all other vehicles must yield to the bus. Why are we not showing the importance of freight by dedicating lanes to the trucks allowing them to move faster during rush hour traffic. We need to show the public the importance of what we do and how their products got on the shelves. This will take a mass effort from the whole industry, but may be part of the solution to getting our industry to be professional in the eyes of the public. I hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving this weekend and take a moment to reflect how the food got on your table.TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO is interviewed about support for Special Olympics

Chairperson Kim Richardson was interviewed at the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics event about the TTSAO involvement with the convoy. Find out how the TTSAO supports this special cause.

Learn more about the TTSAO at www.ttsao.com

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Is it time for an immigration shift in trucking?

If we want to improve our industry we need to do more than just fill the seats. Foreign workers are making up a majority of the transportation industry and much of it is due to a low barrier of entry compared to other occupations according to a recent report by Newcom Media. The report suggests that almost 50% of the drivers in Canada are now immigrants of South Asian background and the Government is looking at increasing immigration support to fill even more seats much needed in the industry. The question is do we want an industry that has people behind the wheel that are just using it as a stepping stone for a new land or do we really want people with a passion for the industry? The report by Newcom suggests that it may be ease of entry over passion, you can read the full report here and decide for yourself. https://www.todaystrucking.com/the-changing-face-of-trucking-a-demographic-shift/ man talking on telephoneMy parents immigrated to Canada back in 1962 so I understand the importance of bringing people to Canada. We need to fill jobs as drivers in our industry and I understand the needs there as well, but are we getting the right people for the job. The report suggested that ease of entry is the reason many are choosing truck driving. If that’s the case then people are coming into the industry not because of an interest or passion for trucking but an easy way to come into the Country. Are we losing that passion in the industry that was once there from those that loved to work around machines or that person that loved to drive. People are getting into the industry due to lack of other opportunities, but could that be the problem?

I believe our immigration laws need to change to where we are bringing people into the Country that not only want to be here, but have a passion for the industry they are trying to get into. Every industry has shortfall of people in general so should we be doing a better job of matching the people coming into the Country to the industries available? If doctors from another Country are coming here to be truck drivers just because they can’t get any other work that doesn’t make sense. There is a real doctor shortage here as well and I have seen how our immigration laws work against us first hand.

There were two drivers I met a couple years ago from the island of Barbados. They both had trucking backgrounds in Barbados even though it is a smaller country. One owned a construction company there and the other had been driving a truck around the island. Both paid from there own pockets to take training through a certified school here in Canada. Both graduated top of class from the training school. Both had job offers from companies and were very competent individuals. So where was the problem? Both got tired of waiting on the red tape of the immigration department. One of those individuals has taken his family to Ireland to drive trucks and start a new life and the other has gone into a different industry else where to find work. Yet here we are talking about increasing the amount of people we bring into Canada to fill the seats. Those two people had a passion for the industry, and put skin in the game and still couldn’t get in. If you would like to hear the interview I did with one of the candidates just click here. http://theleadpedalpodcast.com/lp146-battling-the-immigration-struggle-to-canada-interview-with-philip-gooding-of-barbados

Maybe we need to change the way we immigrate people into Canada. Maybe we need to make it easier for companies to sponsor the right people into the industry. If we want to improve the industry as a whole and we want to fill the jobs with people that want to be there and have a passion for the industry then we need to curve the way we immigrate people to Canada, that doesn’t mean just ease of entry but matching talent to opportunities and that goes for all industries not just trucking.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Are you a fuel-efficient driving champion?

Fuel efficiency is important to any size fleet. Train your drivers to be fuel champions.

SmartDriver for Highway Trucking now offers:

• Free online training
for fleet drivers and
owner‑operators
• Classroom-based
instruction at a driving
school near you
• An On-Road Practicum
to test and perfect
your skills
• A Certificate of Achievement
to confirm that you are a
fuel‑efficiency champion

About SmartDriver

To learn more, visit the Natural Resources Canada FleetSmart website at: www.FleetSmart.NRCan.gc.ca

SDHT 07-Poster_2018-01-10

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Use your training time to get job ready as a new driver

As I was surfing some industry blogs the other day and I came across an article that got me thinking about new drivers and preparing themselves for a new career as a professional driver. The article was a comment style article where a person new to the industry was asking which carrier they should sign on with to get their training.

The new driver had the option of getting his licence on his own or signing on with a carrier and have them train the person through their own training program. His dilemma was which carrier to choose. He posted the comment on the website asking for feedback on different carriers and got a whole lot of information. He was looking at some of the big carriers in the United States trying to evaluate the best ones to work for. In one of his last comments he had talked to a carrier and liked what they had to offer. One of his main reasons for choosing that carrier is that he would be close to home for his training allowing him to be home to sleep in his own bed and eat meals at home.

Driver-in-truck

This is a common way that many people new to the industry decide on choosing a school. They look for a school close to their home so they don’t have to drive too far for their training. I have seen this first hand in training programs as an instructor where students want to leave early from class or are in a hurry to get home to finish chores around the house, but could that be hurting their success?

One of the issues we find in the industry is that people are not prepared for the life style change that comes with a job in the transportation as a driver. The training schools tell the students about it, the recruiters remind them about it at the time of hiring, but then the student gets a job and finds it very hard to adjust to being away from home. Part of the problem may be in the mindset of the student. Trucking is not a nine to five position even in the city as a local driver. Students need to prepare their minds for the change of lifestyle that will occur once they start driving for a company. This means adjusting to the job at the beginning by practicing what you will have to do in reality. Of course you want to keep expenses down until you have money coming in but adjusting your schedule so that it begins to feel like it will when you get hired can go along way to success in the industry.

How do you mimic a lifestyle that you don’t know how will work for the future? The biggest adjustment for most students is the time away from home. Let me tell you from experience as much as it is a big adjustment for you, it is an even bigger adjustment for your family. Depending on how you have set up your training schedule changing it up can be the best thing you can do. Try not to set it up to be nine to five everyday. Spend additional hours practicing what you’ve learned. If you can pick a school that is not in your area so that you can get used to staying out over a few days at a time even better. Adjust your time to waking up early or staying up late, practice taking lunches and snacks like you would on the road. Basically you are getting used to your new life. Once you work for a carrier you won’t be going home at noon after a four hour yard shift or have multiple days off in between runs, so get used to the new lifestyle. The faster you and your family adjust to the new industry, the faster and more successful you will be once you start your new career.

TTSAO-School-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Do you know if you are appreciated as a truck driver?

This week it is Driver Appreciation Week in Canada. This happens every year in the first week of September. In the United States Driver Appreciation Week begins in the second week of September and many companies will celebrate it for the whole month of September. The celebration has grown over the years to include all people in the transportation industry and there will be many discussions and events showing drivers how important they are to the industry and economy. There will be barbecues offering free food and swag during the month but does that really show drivers we care? How do you know as a driver if you are appreciated?

Hamburgers

What can you expect to see in the month of September for Driver Appreciation Week? You will definitely have your fair share of hotdogs or hamburgers. Almost every company I know has a barbecue going on offering free food. Some will offer awards and others will give out hats and shirts. Does that work for the long term though? Can we not get more creative than a barbecue? In my mind driver appreciation should go on all year and can be as little as being recognized at the company to more pay or new trucks. Many of the good carriers have gone as far as to reward drivers with nicer equipment, displaying their names on the truck and more. It really doesn’t matter what you do to acknowledge the driver as long as you do it. The other point is that it should be done all year long.

When I was on the road we were rewarded with better runs, better equipment, and steady loads. Almost every company I worked for used a better truck as the way to make me feel appreciated the most. Steady work and a team atmosphere were what kept me at most companies for years. When I did leave a company it was rarely due to being treated unfairly, but for an opportunity that wasn’t available with that carrier. Many of those carriers never had barbecues or even mentioned Driver Appreciation Week, I am not sure it was even in existence in 80’s and 90’s. When I think about the carriers the feeling for me was like being at home with friends. We got together outside of work and learned about each others lives. We celebrated new additions and mourned when we lost someone. We were like family and we knew we were appreciated for working hard. It’s the little things that made the difference, not the big things.

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

Driver appreciation doesn’t have to be a big deal, but it does have to be consistent. I think Driver Appreciation should be all year long and the good carriers are working towards that. Show your drivers you care every day, not just in the month of September. Happy Driver Appreciation Week to all the drivers and everyone involved in the transportation industry. Without you our World would stop. Thank you for all you do.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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