Tag Archives: transportation

4 Tips for battling road rage this summer

Welcome to summer time with cottage travelers going back and forth on a weekly basis to enjoy long weekends. We have visitors from outside of the Province driving through and everyone is out enjoying good weather. According to reports we have one of the busiest highway corridors in North America with the 401 and beats out places like California for the most vehicles in regular traffic conditions. Add long weekends, holiday celebrations, and special country birthday events an it will make for a busy summer.

This mix is the perfect storm for a condition we know as road rage. I know you have heard about road rage, it’s been all the rage! Sorry I had to do that. Road rage has been around for a long time and some people handle it better than others. It can be hard to ignore someone tailgating you or a person cutting you off when lanes merge. It is important to remember that while you may want to take revenge on someone making a stupid move it may escalate the situation to a dangerous level.

Watch any social media channel and you will see multiple videos ttsao truck at sunsetabout road rage. Some are pretty funny like the one on YouTube where a driver is cut off by another car. He noticed that the driver that cut him off had their windows down on the car when they passed. The driver that was cut off noticed a water puddle up ahead and manages to pass the other car and pulls over to the side. As the traffic pulled towards the puddle the driver that had been cut off sped through the puddle sending a wave of water into the window of the car who cut him off. Certainly not suggested, but funny.

Taking things a step further there was another video of truck drivers taking a motorist’s stupid antics into their own hands in Europe. A driver in a car had been purposely slamming on their brakes startling drivers and causing problems on the roadway. Two truck drivers who had been subject to this decided to take measures into their own hands. The two drivers caught up to the vehicle and boxed him in against the guard rail. The drivers got out of their trucks to talk to the car driver and a fight ensued. It was broken up by another driver who stopped to assist. The situation was quickly defused, but could have turned out much worse. There are plenty of other examples on social media and in real life, just watch the news.

Tips to help you deal with road rage.

How do you handle road rage on our busy roadways this summer? Much of road rage has to do with the individual driving and their temperament. Many of us know when something makes us mad and it is up to you to know when your blood is beginning to boil. Here are a few tips to help you get through a busy summer season.

Trip Plan-Trip planning is your best defence in avoiding road rage. If you are planning a trip or heading to the cottage try to leave at odd times. Getting out of a city on a Friday afternoon at 4:00pm can put you right in the thick of traffic. Try to avoid the rush hour traffic if possible.

Leave plenty of time-Everyone is in a hurry these days and when in a hurry is when patience runs thin. Leave extra time to get to your destination and plan stops along the way. It’s better to be early than late and you will feel more relaxed when driving knowing you have plenty of time to get where you have to go.

Have an alternate route-There are many apps available and I still listen to radio stations that offer traffic on a regular basis so that you can see which routes are busier than others. Have an alternate route in mind should traffic be busy on your usual route. In fact taking country roads may offer a more relaxing drive to your destination.

Courtesy and patience is key-The biggest thing to remember is that we are all trying to get to our destination. Be patient and be courteous on the roads it will help fight road rage. It feels good when you do something good for someone else and they may even return the favour.

I hope these tips help you get to your destination safely so that you can enjoy your well deserved time off. Don’t let road rage ruin your weekend.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO 2017 Election Results – June 14, 2017 – Hamilton, ON

For Immediate Release
The TTSAO Elections were held on June 01, 2017 at Marsh Canada Limited (120 Bremner Blvd., Toronto, ON) at 9:00am. Thank you to all members who stood for this year’s election – the interest shown for being on the TTSAO Board of Directors has never been greater. The 2017-2019 TTSAO Board of Directors takes effect on July 01,
2017.

Congratulations to the following candidates who will serve the 2017-2019 term:

President: Kim Richardson, Kim Richardson Transportation Specialist Inc.
Vice President: Yvette Lagrois, Ontario Truck Training Academy
Secretary: Jack Lochand, Alpine Truck Driver Training
Treasurer: Philip Fletcher, Commercial Heavy Equipment Training

Directors: Kenneth Adams, Crossroads Training Academy (Ottawa/Smiths Falls) Sean Essner, Modern Training Ontario
Jacquie Labute, Northstar Truck Driving School
Brian Pattison, Northern Academy of Transportation Training
Many thanks to the current TTSAO Board of Directors who have helped build the association to where it is today. Their hard work and dedication over the past few years have strengthened the TTSAO and their expertise was fundamental for the growth of the association.

Chairman of the Board, Kim Richardson, KRTS Transportation
June 2015-Apr. 30 2017
President: Yvette Lagrois, Ontario Truck Training Academy
Vice President: Robert Barclay, Crossroads Training Academy (Kingston/Belleville) Secretary: Jay Pootha, Jays Professional Truck Training Centre
Treasurer: Jim Campbell, Ontario Truck Driving School
Directors: Charlie Charalambous, ISB Canada – Director of Communication & Public Relations
Mike Millian, President of the Private Motor Truck Council of Canada Geoff Topping, Challenger – Chairman of the TTSAO Carrier Group Rick Geller, Marsh Canada Limited
Dwight Nelson, Commercial Heavy Equipment Training
Kevin Pattison, Northern Academy of Transportation Training
Ed Popkie, 5th Wheel Training Institute

For more information, contact:

Kim Richardson – President, TTSAO – KRTS office – 1-800-771-8171 x 201 or cell – 905-512-0254 or by email at krichardson@krway.com

Charlie Charalambous – Director of Public Relations,
TTSAO – ccharalambous@isbc.ca

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Trip planning is crucial to surviving over the holiday weekend.

We are approaching a very important holiday weekend that will be sure to make life a struggle for the professional driver. Oh sure Canada Day happens every year, but this year is the 150th birthday celebration so you can bet that It will be much busier than normal. So as a professional driver what do you do, especially if your deliveries take you into large cities like Ottawa or Toronto?

Our traffic patterns change constantly, just jump on the 401 at any city streetpoint of the day to see that. With the special celebrations already beginning in many areas of the Country it can be a challenge to get around. As a driver you will still be required to deliver your load on time and what would be a normal route into the destination may now have changed. How do you continue to deliver on time, avoid road closures and retain your on-time status as a professional driver?

Check your arrival time

The time you have to arrive at your destination is for the load. Depending on your departure time you may not be able to adjust your time but if you can then adjust your time with the customer. What do I mean by that? Let’s assume you are to deliver at 8:00am on July 2nd or 3rd. The chances of driving into your destination in Ottawa with no issues is a dream. Many drivers would normally arrive the night before but with celebrations on the go that may not be an option over the holiday weekend. So when do you arrive? If possible the best time will be between 3:00am and 6:00am and that may require some arrangement ahead of time. You may have to talk with dispatch to change times for pickups and so on to work with your hours of service.

Check your delivery instructions the old fashion way.

The best defence against being held up is basic old school technique, calling on the phone. Calling your delivery customer and find out what the situation will be in their area. They should have a good idea of what roads may be closed for celebrations and where it may be best for you to park. That normal route may not be available at this time.

Ask the company what their hours of operation may be as they may have special closing times over the Holiday. Often a shipper in the United States will have no idea of what days or changes will be happening to a customer in Canada so it is always a good idea to check delivery instructions with a person in the company at your delivery point.

Don’t rely solely on GPS

I am not a fan of GPS units unless you are fairly familiar with the area, but many are. I will offer you a word of caution here, follow the instructions above. Global Positioning Systems may not show road closures, parade routes, or other changes that are required for the celebration weekend. It is always best to call.

Hopefully you will be at home with family and friends over the Holiday weekend and celebrating your Country whether in Canada celebrating its 150th birthday or in the United States celebrating July 4th. Happy Birthday to both Countries. If you aren’t home and are working over that time I hope the tips above will offer ways for you to avoid traffic issues and road closures. An extra step at this point will be the best defence against long delays.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Understanding the importance of inspections can be found viewing Road Check

If you are in training right now to become a truck driver you are most likely learning how to inspect your truck, drive safely, and other important factors of the job. Often when we go through training we don’t understand how each program relates to each other. We are being told through instruction that we must inspect this, or do this a certain way and are doing things because we are told to. Once you get out on the road you realize the importance of how things go together and why you are being taught certain items.

dump truck

Pre-trip inspections are an important part of truck driving. You have to perform inspections everyday in various formats such as pre-trip, post trip, and more. You will have to deal with cargo securement checks, tire checks, and lighting each time you are away from the truck. This gets even more intense when hauling things like dangerous goods or special commodities.

This week Road Check is under way which is an annual campaign where law enforcement teams across North America will be conducting inspections on commercial vehicles twenty four hours per day for seventy two hours straight. This campaign is set up annually to let the public know that law enforcement officials are doing their job in taking badly maintained vehicles off the road. Enforcement officers in Ontario will be conducting the same inspections as law enforcement officers in Orlando Florida or Houston Texas. As a driver now or in the future you will encounter Road Check at some time in your driving career as it is an annual event.

So how can you learn from it as a training tool?

If you can do this safely observing Road Check first hand is the best way to understand the importance of inspections. Hopefully your training facility has arranged to have you go and watch the process as the inspection stations in Ontario allow that once a waiver has been signed. If you are not able to go into the inspection station watching the process from a side road is another option if you can do it safely.

If you are in the inspection station here is the best way to get the most out of your visit?

If possible choose one vehicle and follow that truck all the way through the inspection process. Watch a truck entering the station and when one is flagged to park around back follow the inspector throughout the total process. Ask the inspector why they pulled the truck in for inspection, what problems they found, and how a driver should handle the repairs. If possible talk to the driver and get their thoughts on the process, although be warned they may not be too happy. Use caution here. This will give you a good outlook on what you can expect when you are behind the wheel.

So use this time to really understand the inspection process. It will help you understand what you have been learning in your training and how it relates to the job you will be doing in the near future. Someone taking a course in August won’t have that opportunity to see inspection officers in action with accessibility to ask questions and understand the different levels of inspections. It will reinforce the importance of doing your job properly.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Are you doing the work in your job search?

If you want the job you have to go after it! It amazes me how many people are looking for jobs in a non-organized manner. They are wandering around with little plan in place on what they want, what they are looking for, or how they plan on attaining it when they do come across it. As I talked to people at a local truck show recently I found that many didn’t know basic information that they should have known before even arriving. Getting a job takes a structured plan and dedication for success. That means researching companies ahead of time and knowing who you want to apply with.

I had a gentleman come up to me asking where he could find part time work in trucking. He already had a job that was giving him some work and wanted to add to that without quitting. I told him that if he got a job with a good carrier he wouldn’t have to work for two companies. As we were chatting I asked him the type of work he was looking for? He began to talk about his criteria and when he finished, I pointed to the carrier in the booth next to me. The carrier I directed him to was one of the top carriers in Ontario and he didn’t even know they were at the show.

Another person looking for work wanted me to introduce them to people at the show. When I asked how much research and applying they had done before the show they said none. Whether I knew people at the show or not they should have known who was in the room at that show.

These examples show me a lack of investigation and research. As I have mentioned in all my training classes and past articles research is very easy with today’s world of technology. Once you know about a show the first step in the research phase is to look up the vendors, sponsors, and other businesses attending the show. At that point you can go to their website and find out what they do, positions they are looking for, where they are located, and who the main contacts are. Once you have that information you can start creating a plan of who you want to meet at the show. If you personally know someone at the show you could reach out to them to see if they know people at the companies that you plan on meeting. Make sure you have your resume package together and have it ready to present to those interested. Have a note pad to take information and keep track of people you contacted and when you should follow up.

Here is a summary:

  • Research who will be at the show
  • Research individual websites
  • Make a plan for the show
  • Research who you know at the show
  • Have your resume ready to present
  • Be ready to track contacts and information

Getting a job is a systematic process and many common questions and information can be found with some basic research before the show. It will make your job search much more efficient and successful. Good luck with the shows this summer.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Mountain Driving Takes Skill and Patience

One of the best things about driving a truck is seeing different places and getting paid for it. Most people wake up each morning in the same room at the same time in the same place, but drivers get to wake up in the best places in the country. Think about it everyday you could wake up with a different view outside of your window. If you have ever woken up to see the majestic mountains in front of you, or a beautiful sunrise off the beach in Florida you will know what I mean. Getting to those beautiful places can be challenge and something that takes skill to achieve.

As a professional driver you will encounter mountain driving along your routes at some point in your career. We often think of mountains only in the western part of the country, but you will find them in the East as well. Mountain driving can be required at any time so being ready and knowledgeable on what to do can save your life. Proper trip planning is imperative to avoid mountain driving when possible and be prepared when that isn’t possible.

When things go wrong, they can go really wrong! In my twenty five years of driving I have seen the odd truck in a runaway ramp. I have seen video footage of trucks using runaway ramps, and I have seen my share of burning brakes. Even on video it can be mesmerizing to see a truck in trouble. A video popped up on my social media channel the other day that caught my attention.

A truck had already been past the point where the brakes were overheating and smoking. A police car with the sirens on were following the truck trying to keep other motorists out the truck’s path. The driver is doing his best to keep the truck from hitting other vehicles and you can see that it is picking up speed at an incredible rate. The brakes continue to smoke and they eventually break into flames. The truck picks up more speed and it gets hard for me to tear myself away from the video even though I know there are only two options available to this driver. He is now going so fast that he moves to the left lane as other motorists are staying to the right due to the police siren. I continue to watch and then it happens, the driver sees the runaway ramp and heads to the right side of the roadway. At this point the dirt and debris fill the screen as the truck is engulfed and sinks in the ramp’s gravel and sand. The load and truck are scattered as the truck breaks apart. At this point all I can do is look for the driver and hope he is all right. We see an arm, a head, and then eventually he frees himself and it looks like he is in good health.

The general rule is that you stay in the same gear as you used to climb the mountain to descend the mountain. That is fine on smaller hills but hard to do on long mountain grades. Patience comes into play here and many drivers don’t remain in the same gear. This is especially true for those that are not used to mountain driving. Proper training is the first step and being a student for your whole career will help you to learn improved techniques for driving. Get proper training up front and get advice from more experienced drivers if your trip takes you through mountains to your destination. TTSAO certified training is a good place to start.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Is random drug testing coming to Canada?

The topic of drugs have been top of mind for a few years now in both Canada and the United States. It started a few years back with marijuana being the drug of choice for many with chronic pain. Since then it has been a hot topic for Government agencies on legalization which in turn has led to business startups in locations across the U.S. The topic has mostly stayed south of our borders with certain States legalizing marijuana and drug testing in transportation being required for those going to the United States, however the drug landscape is changing and fast!

Drivers that weren’t heading towards the United States generally didn’t have to worry about being tested here in Canada. You may have had to be tested when being hired as a pre-employment drug test but that was about it. With the potential legalization of marijuana coming to Canada in the near future there is more opportunity for access to drugs therefore more opportunity for additional consumption.

Drivers have always been subject to random drug tests when working for carriers that haul to the United States. Whether that driver actually crosses the border does not matter. Once a carrier is deemed international in services, twenty-five percent of the workforce in safety sensitive positions are eligible for drug testing each year. A driver has the opportunity to be tested up to four times per year if their name comes up in the random pool of names drawn each month.

The rules for Canadian drivers may be changing. Companies that don’t travel to the United States have generally been kept out of the loop of drug testing regulations. Other than the pre-hire testing many drivers go through they have been exempt from testing other than in company policy of an incident. That may be changing with a recent change to Toronto’s largest transit company.

Recently the Toronto Transit Commission won an injunction to start testing their employees involved in safety sensitive positions. The TTC has been scoured with incidents related to drugs and alcohol and decided to implement a random program to all employees in safety positions. On day one of the program two employees were deemed “under the influence” while on the job and have been suspended. So what does this mean for the rest of us in transportation?

With the TTC being one of the largest transit providers in the largest Province in Canada can change the landscape for drivers that only work in Canada. Generally Canadian only drivers have been exempt from testing but the TTC program is showing there is a need for drivers that don’t leave the Province. As marijuana becomes more accessible in Canada through legalization the transportation industry is currently working towards finding a way to protect workers and the public at large. If the TTC wins their current battle with their Union this may open doors to other transportation based companies to allow random testing on their drivers.

Being a professional truck driver adds extra scrutiny among the public as the size and weight of the vehicles can cause increased damage and loss of life. Ensuring those behind the wheel are drug and alcohol free is important to all of us on the road. There have been a number of incidents over the last couple of years with drivers in Canada only and when unionized companies like TTC have the opportunity to test their members means it will soon be coming to the rest of the transportation sector. We all need to do our part to curve this growing problem and the first step to opening up doors as a new driver in today’s transportation environment is to remain drug and alcohol free.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Should you be worried about mergers and acquisitions as a driver?

You’re driving for a carrier and you start to hear rumblings that they may be entering into the stage of a buyout or even worse bankruptcy proceedings. What do you do? Do you panic and quit on the spot? Do you turn a blind eye and keep going as if nothing is going on? Do you approach the company and ask for an explanation? Do you look for information from your colleagues? The truth is that any of these suggestions may or may not give you the correct information and will be impossible to predict anyway.

Many of us have been through these types of changes before. Much of the time it doesn’t affect employees at a certain level so there is no need to panic if you are in a position such as a driver if that is the main service of the company. Depending on the structure of the companies involved in the transaction those in management or office roles will see the most changes as there will be duplicate roles that may require streamlining. So how do you know what to do?

Of course you will need to look at each situation on its own because they are different, but here are some signs that may help you.

Your company has been purchased by another company, don’t panic!

If you are working for a carrier and they have been bought out by another do not panic. Companies buy each other all the time and is a way of acquiring market share. This allows them bid on larger contracts and attain additional services that they may not currently provide. I worked for a carrier that was bought out three times in the thirteen year period that I worked for them. The name changed and top management changed, but the services remained the same. The only company that won there was the graphic company in my mind.

Your company announces it is restructuring but everything seems to be running as normal, keep a close eye on the situation!

Companies often restructure so if things are running without service interruptions or issues with payroll then you may not be affected. I wouldn’t panic but I would keep a close eye on things. The company may just be adjusting services and nothing will change. If you see services drop, a decline in contracts, or a major change in equipment then it may indicate problems.

Your company can’t pay their bills and service is interrupted, panic!

If you start to notice that your company is having trouble with cash flow then you may want to begin looking at other options. Early in my career I didn’t pay attention to the signs when the small carrier I was driving for was going bankrupt. Our services were all on a cash basis and the workload was getting slower. The company ended up going bankrupt and my last two paycheques bounced. I didn’t pay enough attention to the signs.

If your employer is going through one of the situations above then pay attention, but don’t panic. If you are a driver then you are probably okay. Where drivers have problems is when they have a bad safety record or their performance is impacting the bottom line of the company due to poor performance. The new company may be decide to do some cleaning. These situations all are very hard to predict and can change at the last minute in negotiations. Panicking often just fuels the fire and causes people to make the wrong decisions. The best way to insulate yourself from issues out of your control is to be as professional as possible. Employers need good employees. Be a safe reliable employee with good performance and most companies will want you around. Keep your resume up to date should you have to move in a hurry. The only thing in life that is for sure is change so always keep your eyes open for opportunity. Good luck!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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It’s a truck, it won’t float!

Our perception to what is heavy and what is not can be very problematic to a driver if you don’t respect the equipment you are driving. Our minds tell us that something is heavy because we know we can’t lift the object as we know it. That is why when you see someone pull a truck with their body or lift a car off of someone saving their life we see it as superhuman. It’s because we see that vehicle as impossible to lift due to size and weight. If we were Superman we would see a car as an object that could be thrown around like a ball because of his superhuman strength.

This perception of the weight of the vehicle can fool many new drivers when they start their careers. Vehicles fool the drivers in a few ways. One way is when an incident occurs the truck usually does much more damage than the driver thought it would due to the weight of the vehicle. Even an incident with little speed involved can cause great damage when an incident occurs. What may have been a small fender bender with a car can turn very different when a truck is involved.

Another issue with perception is the size of the vehicle. Trucks are large vehicles and just walking around them can be intimidating. Without a load on however a truck is not that heavy. If I tell you an empty truck is 35,000 pounds you would say that’s heavy. The truth is we haven’t even put a load on it at that weight and if you are driving a truck that is empty you will see the difference between a loaded and empty truck. This causes big problems in heavy wind situations and many trucks have been blown over in the wind if the driver does not have the experience or follow the warnings on bridges and other passages. This also offers problems with soft shoulders on highways and other issues where our minds fool us with the weight of the vehicle.

The height of a vehicle can also be problematic for drivers not understanding how they can be a challenge in today’s environment. When we talk about height of vehicles often trailer height and low bridges are what comes to mind. That is one area that has always been a challenge with many low bridges dotted throughout the landscape of North America. But trailer height isn’t our only worry. The height of the vehicle from the ground can cause problems for many drivers especially this time of year with high water levels. How many times have you seen drivers driving through rivers, flooded streets and more on social media channels. Drivers see that and feel that they too can do the same thing, but vehicle dynamics, weight of the vehicle, and placement of components all play a part in the driver’s success. Of course we can also watch vehicles on social media that have floated down a river with the force of a river current out of control.

The best way to avoid many of these problems in a truck is to respect the vehicle and use it for what it was meant to be used for. Trucks were never meant to be used to drive through rivers or drive over bridges in windy conditions. If you are a new driver or even an experienced driver vehicle respect should be a primary concern. Know your vehicle and how it responds, respect your environment, and pay attention to seasonal and environmental changes on your route. Attention to these issues will make you a successful and safe driver.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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If you’re looking for a career path? A trip in a truck may show you the path.

I am speaking at an event for youth to talk about career paths and where the possibilities can lead them in their careers. I will be one of six keynote speakers that will talk about their careers and how we got to where we are today. I am pretty confident that there will not be many in the room that have trucking as part of their career path. Among the other speakers is a police officer, printer, landscape entrepreneur, and myself.

If you look at the career path of the other presenters those careers are normally long term careers that can be accomplished and started in your younger years in college. You can come out of school, go to police college, and onto the force. You can start a landscape business in college and develop it to a good business over time. I am not taking anything away from the accomplishments of any of these people, but most of those careers have a clear career path.

With trucking things are different. This is outlined through my story with trucking and many of my industry friends that started as truck drivers and now are in other positions outside of driving. Some are consultants, have industry publications, some are in management, and others have become owners of trucking companies. All of those careers started with the truck and a person sitting behind the wheel. Many of us didn’t know we would end up where we have in our careers and a big thank you to trucking for opening up options in our career. This sentiment was also echoed at the recent TTSAO conference where many of the panelists talked about their career paths and the scenic road that got them to eventual success.

At this point you are probably asking yourself what the point is of this article. If you are looking at career options and haven’t seriously thought about a career in trucking and where the industry can take you you may want to give it some serious thought. If you can’t see that far ahead then taking a trip behind the wheel may fuel some passion and allow you to see the opportunities.

Here is a story about a driver that is now in another position. He started driving for a respectable carrier that had opportunities with various types of freight. He did well as a driver and decided to become a business owner buying his own truck. He did well as an owner operator and because of his professionalism was offered a position as part of the recruiting team which is the position he still holds to this day.

Transportation is one of the largest industries in North America and is not going away any time soon. It may be changing with much of that change coming from technology but it will still be around for the long term. Take an opportunity that you may not have thought about and try trucking. It may surprise you!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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