Tag Archives: transportation

Navigating Truck World as Training Student

Navigating Truck World

Tom is sitting at his desk in training school nodding off in a day dream when the instructor makes an announcement about a truck show. Sounding like a host from a giant carnival he says. ‘This is the greatest show on Earth and you want to make sure you attend.” Tom lifts his head from his day dream and says, “What’s so big about it?”

‘It’s the biggest show on Earth, well maybe Canada anyway”, says the instructor, “ and you have to be there because it only comes to Toronto every second year.” The instructor hands Tom the brochure for the show outlining five huge halls of trucks, carriers booths, trade show exhibits, seminars, and more. Tom looks it over leans back in his chair and says, “Where do we even start?”

Truck World is produced by Newcom Media and comes to Toronto Truck Worldevery second year with the shows being in Montreal every other year and is renamed Expocam. As the show only comes to Toronto every other year and Newcom is the largest media company within the industry it is a show everyone in the industry attends. The show is three days long and is an inside show and corporate show for Thursday and Friday with Family Day being on the Saturday. Many industry professionals will attend all three days making connections and reuniting with old friends and colleagues.

The show is divided into 5 Halls and each hall is themed to a point. One hall might have all the truck manufacturers, another hall may have all the carriers, with other halls having aftermarket parts. People can request to be anywhere they want and you will find a mix scattered throughout the show. For instance on Friday and Saturday of the show there is a Recruiting Pavilion for carriers all in one place. So how do you navigate a show that size?

Depending on your goals for the show you may want to attend multiple days. Let’s assume you’re Tom sitting in a training school and you’ve just heard about the show. You have a young family and the trucking industry is new to you. Then Saturday would be the day I would go and here is the reason why. Saturday of the show is Family Day and many of the vendors will have things for the kids and all the Halls will be open. The Recruiting Pavilion will only be open on Friday and Saturday of the show. If you’re new to the industry it is good to get your family involved and this is a great way for them to get an idea of the industry you will be getting involved with.

If you are in a school such as Tom you also want to use this time to network with carriers and recruiters to find out what they have to offer. Make sure you have copies of your resume in case you see an opportunity at the show. I always suggest that people looking for a job have their resume in both traditional and electronic forms, but certainly in electronic form on your phone or device of your choice. This way when you meet a recruiter you can send the information instantly while talking to them and possibly fast forward the process. There are many opportunities at a show like Truck World. Checking out the show map upon arrival or before arriving is a good way to target the important parts of the show or find particular vendors.

How do you get to Truck World? Truck World is in Toronto at the International Centre and has a charge of $20 for entry, however I don’t know anyone that pays that since it is fairly easy to get in for free. Depending on when you’ve read this you may still be able to get free tickets through Truck World themselves. Click here to go to the Truck World website https://www.truckworld.ca

If the school you are attending or people in their network are exhibiting they also may offer free tickets with a certain code. Almost every vendor registered for the show has a code to get people in for free. If you’re new to the industry, a veteran looking to improve connections, or just want to get an idea of the people involved in the industry then Truck World is the place to be. It won’t be back for another two years.

Here is another event that will be of interest.

Check out the TTSAO Hiring Event on Saturday May 26th, 2018 with information and opportunities for all careers in the industry. Click here for more information.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Check out the great companies already registered for the TTSAO Hiring Event-May 26th

The TTSAO Hiring Event happening on May 26th, 2018 has many great companies already involved. If you are looking to find opportunities for a long time career in the transportation industry both in the drivers seat and outside of the driver’s seat then this will be the place to be. Free to attend.

Would you like to be involved in the event? Register below:

TTSAO Industry Hiring Event Registration Form2

Companies Already Registered

Check out the Event Information

Carrier Group Hiring Event Poster

Learn more about the event here

 

See you there!

 

 

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Driver Impact in a Fleet

Driver Impact in a Fleet

Employees often feel as though they are just a number at many companies. The larger the company, the larger the number. Large companies can offer you things small companies can’t such growth opportunities, benefits, training programs, and sometimes better wages. Depending on the company culture an employee can get lost in a sea of coworkers and have a hard time standing out or getting ahead in their career.

Many drivers especially those starting out may decide to work for smaller companies and family operations. The benefits to a smaller company is the management team knows your name, possibly access to nicer equipment, experience with specialized operations, opportunities with a wide variety of freight, and it is usually easier to get noticed for doing a good job.

I have worked for both style of carriers and they all have their advantages and disadvantages. I gained a lot of experience in my early years working for small companies that hauled different types of freight. This allowed me to choose the type of work enjoyed and had great equipment. I really enjoyed that family operation.

I have also worked for large companies where there were many layers of management and operations. The training I received at those companies I still use in my work today and the salary and benefits were second to none. There were many rules and regulations to be followed and exceptional opportunities for promotion.

No matter which style of carrier you choose to work for you as a driver do have an impact on that company and how you perform can determine the longevity of that company. At a large carrier there may be more money to cover incidents and due to the vast amount of employees it may not be as noticeable, but there are also more opportunities for problems in multiple areas.

In a small carrier a driver has major impact when an incident Trucks in mountainshappens. If there are only a couple of trucks in a fleet one incident can shut down a carrier in a hurry. Violations from a driver or delivery incidents can cause a company to go bankrupt by not being able to keep up with incident costs. Bad truck management can cause a carrier to lose money and increase road safety by not keeping up with repairs.

We recently saw this effect on the tragedy with the Humboldt Broncos hockey incident. This carrier may never recover from an incident like this. The incident is still under investigation and I am not suggesting blame at this time, just outlining the facts. The trucking company only had two trucks and was new to the industry and even though their record is in good standing they have been placed on suspension until the investigation is completed. The damage and loss of life is astronomical and beyond belief in this incident. What does this mean for the company?

It is on the fence whether this company will survive once the dust settles. You have the hard costs of replacing the freight, clean up costs, possible charges for the incident, replacement of the vehicle, and higher insurance costs. On the soft costs you have the emotional state of the driver, ongoing training programs, mental consultations, and the brand implication of the company. Many drivers never get back in the seat after an incident like this and many small carriers never survive.

As a driver you can have a major impact on a company and possibly the survival of the company. Driving safely, doing proper inspections, and being the true professional driver you were trained to be should be the focus of every driver in the industry. Take your position seriously whether working for a large fleet or a two truck company. How you perform can determine the outcome of any carrier.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to the town of Humboldt and the Broncos hockey team.

Looking for a job in the transportation industry? Check out the TTSAO Hiring Event on May 26th, 2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Metro Truck Driving School Joins TTSAO Family

The TTSAO is proud to announce new school member Metro Truck Driving School. Welcome to the TTSAO family and you can learn more about Metro Truck Driving School at www.metrotrucktraining.com


Metro Truck Driving School Metro-School-Logo
Address: 6985 Davand Dr.
Suite 11 Mississauga, ON L5T 1Y7
Phone: 905-673-1441
Fax: 905-673-1989
Contact: George Cierpich
Email: metrotruckschool@gmail.com
Website www.metrotrucktraining.com

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Are You Following Your Training?

Are You Following Your Training?

“It Could Save Your Life!”

Training has been at the forefront of many discussions over the years especially since the implementation of M.E.L.T. (Mandatory Entry Level Training) as to what is the appropriate amount of training for new drivers. Many certified schools within the TTSAO (Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario) offer more training than required by the Government as their standard programs. If a good school is offering more than the requirements and have good instructors with a passion for making sure a student is successful then it is up to the student to follow their training once the course is completed. You may be thinking that’s why they were trained.

How a student uses their training after they leave a training facility is up to them. The students that want to be successful and have good careers will use their training as a solid base of fundamentals to build on. There are students however that go through programs with a focus of just getting a licence or a certain job and then forget their training. I have always said that a trucking career is built in stages with the foundation being good training which takes up to a year to complete. The next two to three years a student should be working on gaining experience. The next five years should be spent improving efficiency so that they make better money at the job, and after ten years a student has to work on not being complacent. Of course those are just guidelines based on what I have seen in a twenty five year career on the road and it will be different for everyone.

Are you following your training?

Many students see the value in their training and often we see that drivers with many years of experience are the ones that have the most trouble with remembering the basics. Maybe they have become complacent or have just fallen into bad habits. When training is done at carriers for some of the basics such as pre-trip inspections many times it is the older more experienced group that has trouble. They have been doing it their own way for so long that they miss some of the smaller items of the inspection. They stopped following the training.

I began writing this article after watching a serious crash on a video of a truck driver that got stuck at a railway crossing. If you think of the basics of railway crossings in training facilities there are only a few things to watch for, make sure the train isn’t coming, make sure you have proper clearance to get across the track, and stay in one gear until you have crossed the track. I am not sure what happened in this particular situation as to why the truck got stuck between the barriers of this particular railway track, but it seems as though the driver did not look at the signage that says “no trucks” and got stuck on the track. Thankfully the driver and the train crew were okay, but it is certainly shocking to see the train drag the truck down the track at full speed.

As drivers gain more experience on the road and possibly get through a few situations with a lucky outcome they may begin to take more chances. It’s possible that’s what happened to this driver, he took one chance too many and it didn’t work out the way he hoped it would. It may seem dry and boring sitting in class when you want to get out on that open road, but following your training may be one step to keeping you alive.

Looking for a certified training school in Ontario Canada?
Start at www.ttsao.com

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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There’s an Angel Among Us!

The Truckload Carriers Association (TCA) is wrapping up their annual convention in the United States this week and every year they announce a driver for their Highway Angel Award. The Highway Angel Award goes to a driver for their bravery or heroic efforts on the road. The drivers are not just changing a tire for someone on the side of the road, they are saving people from life and death. The award has been around for a while as there have been many drivers honoured as recipients of the award.

This year is extra special for a number of reasons. The first reason is that the award has gone to a Canadian driver and the second reason is the award has gone to a driver for Challenger Motor Freight a well known Canadian carrier among our ranks. The Angel is among us!

John Weston has received the Truckload Carriers Association’s

John Weston-Challenger
Picture by Challenger Motor Freight

Highway Angel of the Year Award for his heroic actions on two occasions in 2017. On one occasion Weston noticed a vehicle in a ditch and pulled over to check out the situation, finding a Mother and her children in the car. He kept them warm in his truck until emergency vehicles arrived. On the second occasion Weston stopped to assist at an accident with two trucks and stayed to comfort a driver trapped in his truck who passed away while Weston was comforting him. Congrats to John Weston for being the hero that he is and representing our industry in such a positive way.

You can read the full story on Truck News through the link below on John Weston receiving his award:
https://www.trucknews.com/transportation/canadian-driver-wins-highway-angel-award/1003084675/

You can learn more about John Weston on Challenger’s website by clicking the link below:
https://www.challenger.com/challenger-angel-john-w/

The trucking industry has had a long history of being Angels of the Highway whether saving someone’s life or just helping someone change a tire. For many it is not about the heroics, but just helping people. Trucking is a people business either dealing with customers, inspection officers, or the general public. Truck drivers have big hearts and it has been shown again and again through heroic efforts like John Weston displayed or the drivers that turn out year after year to support causes like Special Olympics and Trucking for a Cure.

Driving is tough enough on its own. Driving safely in traffic, being professional with customers, and battling the elements like weather takes professionalism and nerves. Drivers like John Weston have climbed the ladder a few notches higher by being Highway Angels. Thank you John for heroism.

Are you looking to work for good carriers and create a career you can be proud of? If so check out the TTSAO Hiring Event happening on May 26th, 2018 in Mississauga. Click here for more details. http://ttsao.com/2018/03/07/ttsao-announce-hiring-event-may-26th-2018/

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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CHET Awards Driver for Passing 3000th Road Test

Commercial Heavy Equipment Training (CHET) hit a big bench mark when a student passed their test recently. Student Russell Stoney passed the 3000th road test  with the training school.

Russell Stoney was awarded a gift from the training school and is currently enrolled in the 200 hour certified program with the school. Congratulations to Russell for passing his test and CHET for hitting test number 3000.

Russell Stoney-CHET

About CHET

Commercial Heavy Equipment Training Ltd. (CHET) was formed nearly 20 years ago, in 1997, as a subsidiary of the Musket Transport Ltd. to provide a high caliber of training to the industry through its graduates. Most transportation companies now demand that new drivers graduate from a certified training program as a prerequisite to employment. Learn more at www.chet.ca

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Is Your Company Attracting or Repelling Talent?

If a new person walked into your company unannounced, would they want to work there based on first impressions? That was the message from a General Manager of a logistics company the other night. Recruiting has changed from the way it used to be done said this company executive. Let me bring you up to speed.

I was at a company open house the other night as a client opened up a new office in the area and held a small event for their network to see the new space. They were formerly located in a smaller building with basic amenities but had outgrown that office location. This new office is in a high building with beautiful views out of each window and is large, bright, and modern. In the large cafeteria area there is even a pool table and kitchen area that will be perfect for team meetings and gatherings.

As speeches were being presented the General Manager mentioned that recruiting talent is much different today than it had been before. She mentioned in the past that a potential employee in an interview would have to do their best to convince her why they were the best for the job and it was her decision to take a chance on them. Times have changed and now it is so difficult to find talented employees that the conversation has now changed to does this person want to work here? Is the office, the job description, and team members what that person may be looking for in a job or career?

It was quite obvious that this technique was working as I talked with team members at the event that were excited about the space and their careers. I have been working with this company for almost a decade and have seen team members come and go. There were many new team members at the event that had recently joined the team and the energy showed.

Environment is very important to many employees especially truck Chrome-Dump-Truckdrivers. When I was on the road I was very particular about my truck. I had to have it organized a certain way, it had to be clean, and it had to be nice looking. That helped me operate at maximum efficiency and with pride in my company. In fact when I went looking for a job the first thing I would do is drive to the back of the yard of a company and see which was the worst truck in the yard. As a new person that is normally your truck unless it is a yard truck.

So I ask you this question; is your company attracting or repelling talent? It could be the trucks, it could be their office, it could be the team! If I walked in off the street unannounced would I want to work for you? We all know that first impressions count and in today’s job market everything is about attraction and company culture. Who are you attracting?

Looking for quality carriers working with new students? Check out our Carrier Group Members

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Teaching Trucking Through March Break

March Break is the perfect time teach your family about trucking and what you will be dealing with once you finish your course and get your licence. Depending on your age you may be spending time with your kids or working harder to avoid them. Of course many of you are taking some well deserved vacation time with the kids and possibly on a road trip or doing day trips with the family. As much as you may be on vacation this is a great time to let the family understand about this profession of trucking that you are involved in.

I still do this to this day. When my wife and I are traveling on a road trip I am always reminiscing about my days on the road from interesting things I saw in a particular area to stories of people I met at the local truck stops. Watching those shiny trucks on the road and the interesting things that happen in trucking on a daily basis still bring back fond memories of the road.

There was the time that I was explaining the difference between a County Mountie (local police officer) and a Smokey Bear (State Trooper) to my wife when she was driving and then ended up being pulled over by the same officer. Class over! Maybe I started that lesson a little late.

Everything you see on the road is a potential teaching tool on many father-and-boys-playingaspects of life but certainly in trucking. Passing that cool chromed up truck on the highway is a great time to teach your family about pride in equipment. Passing an accident is a great time to talk about the importance of road safety. Stuck in a traffic jam is the best time to talk about patience and the importance of trip planning while letting the family know this could be you on the road. The next time you call home to say you’re going to be late they will have a better understanding of what is happening on the road.

If you are traveling with the family enjoy yourself but don’t lose this chance to offer some education and insights into the wonderful world of transportation. If you are older and just going through your daily grind then this week is a good time to practice patience with more people on the roadway. Whichever way you are spending March Break make the most of it and enjoy it.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO Wraps Up 2018 Conference

The TTSAO (Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario) just TTSAO Conference 2018wrapped up their 3rd annual conference on March 1st of 2018. With a full house present TTSAO kicked off the conference with a bang. Their was a real difference in output and planning with this years conference and it was highly noticed. I have been to many conferences and the conference this year started off to a great start.

Day one began with the TTSAO Carrier Group and newly formed TTSAO Insurance Group holding town hall styled meetings with information on how they are planning to create community within the memberships of the TTSAO. Both meetings were well attended and the information covered was well received.

The next event was the Annual General Meeting and I have to say that I have been to many AGMs and very few have attendance where it was standing room only. The TTSAO has a lot of things going on for the future and apparently many wanted to hear how things would be progressing.

Once the meeting wrapped up it was time for the Conference Cocktail Party sponsored by Revolution Staffing. Held in the area with the sponsors the cocktail party offered beverages and food and a presentation from Kelly Henderson of the Trucking Human Resource Sector Council on Millennials and how to attract them to the industry.

Day two of the conference started out with the MTO presentation on M.E.L.T (Mandatory Entry Level Training) and an insurance panel focused on the myth of young people being allowed to drive at an early age and how to make sure anyone is qualified to operate a commercial vehicle. Guy Broderick of the Carrier’s Group was the moderator and host for the conference this year and did a great job.

TTSAO Conference 2018

Young people were front and centre at the conference as the next two presentations spoke to members of the PMTC Young Leaders Group and a student panel from drivers currently going through training programs. Both presentations offered a look at what young people are looking for in a career and how they are looking for those careers. These were very informative sessions that were of real interest to the audience.

After a great buffet lunch a few key people were recognized for their contribution to the industry and TTSAO membership. Claude Chaulk of Manitoulin Transport received the Industry Service Award for his years of dedication and service to the industry. Also receiving the Appreciation Award was Charlie Charalambous for his dedication and service to the TTSAO and their membership. Congratulations to both gentlemen.

TTSAO Conference 2018

The afternoon sessions wrapped up with a presentation on diversity with Jane Jazwary of Carrier’s Edge talking about women and culture in the workplace and how to make the workplace more appealing for the future. The final presentation was the five year outlook with Lou Smyrlis and a panel of industry executives discussing the future of the industry and where technology and regulations will be taking us over the next five years.

So the TTSAO wraps up this conference with a strong focus to the future. Their next event is the Industry Hiring Event happening on May 26th, 2018 in Mississauga and they have already set the date for their 4th Annual Conference happening on February 27-28th, 2019. Stay tuned to the TTSAO website for updates and information as they take truck training into the future.

To see more pictures form the 2018 conference click here!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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