Tag Archives: truck training schools association of ontartio

Starting Your Job Search in the Right Place

If you’re looking for a job opportunity you have to be in the right place to find the right job. I was recently reading a post from a young person looking for a job in the trucking industry and wondering where to find a carrier that would hire them and help with training. Now I personally know many carriers that are looking for truck drivers and other positions for their fleets here in Canada and the United States is much the same.

Often I find people are trying to find employment in the wrong way. They are trying to find a job asking people on social media. Now I know social media is considered main stream these days and it has its benefits and drawbacks but the opinions for the most part will be personal and may not relate to your specific situation but to the person offering the opinion. Social media should be used as a way to learn more about a company once you have found one rather than at the start of your search for a job, so where do you start?

If I was looking for a truck driving job and didn’t have an inside connection to a particular carrier I would start with the industry resources or job boards. Any carrier that is well connected in the industry will be part of an industry association or advertise in industry publications. Some carriers will advertise outside of the industry but truck driving is different from many other industries and a person needs to understand the job before applying for the position.

Pipe Truck

Starting with industry specific publications will give you a bird’s eye view of who is hiring, what they offer, and the type of freight they haul. After that you can look into benefits, training, and other important factors involved in working with a carrier.

Asking friends is fine, but you may not get the proper information. Trusting carriers alone can be an issue if the carriers are not reputable. Starting a job search can be a daunting task but if you do it the right way you can get the proper information and be successful. If you are looking for tips on getting a job in the trucking industry the TTSAO has an article list on their website with some great tips. http://ttsao.com/category/industry-employment/

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO Meets with Transportation Minister

On October 22nd the TTSAO met with Transportation Minister Caroline Mulroney and her staff to discuss a variety of topics. The Minister and her staff were provided with a history of previous meetings with the Auditor General and previous Ministers of Transportation. Some of the key issues discussed were: 

  • Lack of consistency with MELT and the need for MELT to be extended to all license classes
  • The need for Instructor Certification
  • Concerns with Advanced Standing
  • Entry level drivers testing on automatic transmissions
  • The TTSAO Pre-Qualification/ Requalification Program
  • Our concerns with the MTO stakeholder meetings not continuing
  • Next steps and other planned meetings
TTSAO-with-Minister-of Transportation-copy

Overall the meeting was very positive and the Minister and her staff will review the supporting documentation provided. We look forward to continuing our meetings with government on behalf of the TTSAO Members and will continue to provide updates as new information is available. 


Thank you

Kim Richardson, 

TTSAO President

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Over Regulating vs Over Promoting, What’s Best for our Industry?

In January 2020 the United States will be launching their drug and alcohol clearing house for commercial drivers that is suppose to offer transparency for truck drivers allowing employers to see the results of testing done on drivers in the industry. This apparently is to make our roads safer and solve the problem of drug and alcohol related deaths behind the wheel. You can read about the new regulations here. https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevebanker/2019/10/24/a-shocking-loophole-affecting-road-safety-is-finally-about-to-close/#519cec65770f

Over the last few years we have brought in Mandatory Entry Level Training, Electronic Logging Devices, and changed a number of regulations regarding Hours of Service. I am all for making our roads safer but are regulations the way to do it or are we just making it more of a turn off for people to get into our industry? If you add in all the talk of self-driving trucks, Amazon shipping, and robotic technology it can be very hard to attract talent our industry. We are already driving out the many long term drivers currently doing the job and not attracting the younger generations we need because the industry isn’t attractive. Are we focusing on the right areas in our industry or are we killing our industry?

We can’t tell what will happen in the future but there are opportunities now in the industry in a number of fields. If we spent as much time teaching people to make the right decisions and fixing the real problems in the industry such as safe parking and infrastructure such as separate truck lanes or priority traffic patterns to keep goods moving it would be much more safer and attractive than telling everyone when they should sleep. Regulating an industry that has so many variables is not only making roads unsafe but not attracting the people that we need to carry out the very important task of truck driving.

trucks-crossing-border

What people developing new technology for the trucking industry are not telling us is the price of those trucks and the fact that most small to mid-sized fleets won’t be able to afford those vehicles. They are not telling us that the transportation industry has been slow to follow in technology over the years and that if you were to put a self driving truck in the fleet most people wouldn’t know how to get it to move. I use technology in a day to day basis and believe it is helpful to our lives if it is used to make our lives more efficient and safe.

We need to spend more time showing people why our industry is important and changing the industry to be more attractive to the next generations instead of the way we are doing it now and turning everyone away from an industry that many of us have built a life on. Trucking will change that’s for sure, but I don’t see it going away!

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Build Your Job Resume in Modules

Building a resume in modules may be the best way to keep it current without retyping it each time. If you’ve noticed the trend as technology gets better that resumes may soon be a thing of the past. We are seeing more applications that are allowing job candidates to upload their information into an app where it lives and can be updated as needed. Many of these applications allow employers to view the information as required to hire candidates. This has got be easier than paper.

Do you remember paper applications? If you were applying to multiple places in a day you would have writers cramp at the end of the day in your hand. Resumes were saving us all but brought on a new set of problems as they now can be created ahead of time but were fairly easy to falsify or hide certain issues with prior employers.

We have now seen a new transition from resumes to online application systems allowing employers and job seekers to save all the information within the system and have it verified for the employer. Of course to use the system the employer and potential employee have to be on the same program. That brings us to the next question, “Do you still need a resume?

I believe resumes are still important and used by many employers, but I can see them going by the wayside in the near future as technology continues to develop. That leaves us with today where we have a mix of the old in the odd paper resume out there and the new which I will call the online program application. The resume sits in the middle, so it will still be required for the time being.

I think it is important to always keep your resume current whether looking for a job or not. You never know when an opportunity will come along that is the perfect dream job for you and even if you have been highly recommended most employers will still want a resume. This is why it is a good idea to build your resume in modules. If you think of how a resume is laid out it has different parts under different headings. Some of those parts are static meaning they don’t change and others will change as your experience changes.

Current position, references, and training will change based on your current position so that can be built as one module. Your experience and past employment will stay the same so that should be built as one module. Your last module will be licensing, language, and other items which normally stays the same. This way you only have to update one module when an opportunity arises.

Person-filling-out-application

The reason for potentially building your resume in modules means that you can use all the different submission options such as online programs to traditional resumes or even paper in a quick method of keeping things updated at a moments notice. You can offer your resume with the static modules and just change the current job module as required. You may even fill out one portion and upload the rest of your resume that doesn’t change. Being job ready is the first secret to getting great opportunities as they arise.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Being Job Ready in 2019

What does being job ready mean in 2019 and 2020? Does it mean you have to be able to out work the person next to you? Does it mean you have to a university degree in your chosen field? Does it mean you have to have a technological background? What does job ready mean anymore?

Decades ago being job ready means you were willing to put in long hours at work and do what it takes to get the job done. Trucking companies were looking for people that didn’t mind hard work and that’s why people with a farming background succeeded so well in the industry. Being educated was for those with financial resources to get someone to college and many people had grade 10 education or less but had a work ethic that carried them through and gave them a good life. They excelled in the industry because of the farming and mechanical backgrounds allowing them to fix equipment and have pride in their work.

Today those same values are only important to the older drivers that made their careers successful through hard work. Today people are educated and focused more on work / life balance than getting the job done at all costs. As carriers struggle to change with a rolling economy and demands from a changing labour market it is changing what is attracting new drivers to the industry leaving transportation in a fluctuating market. Who are we looking for?

When you apply for a job in the market today you have to have a number of things going for you. Employers want a mix of old and new and that is very hard to find in the same person. They want someone educated and tech savvy with the old values of willing to work long hours and get the job done while being safe. Those people are out there but our industry has not changed the way things have been done for over 30 years. We haven’t shown respect for the time of the driver and we are still looking for someone to work long hours while that someone is good around equipment with a safety mindset. Unfortunately that is not what young people want in their job. What does that mean for being job ready in 2019 and 2020?

Carriers are changing to meet the demand of applicants in our industry so they can attract the talent they need. They are doing their best to add flexibility to their operations with shorter days and flexible start times. Many are now paying for detention time and offering more technology in the trucks. Different types of people are now making up many carrier teams allowing for different operation styles. Driver pay is slowly rising to help attract talent to the workplace.

Team-Drivers

What does the perfect truck driver model look like in 2020? “A truck driver that is educated with a willingness to be better,” would be my statement if I was asked. Trucking offers so many opportunities but many of them you cannot see until you are in the industry. Someone that is willing to take a little blind faith and get started in an industry that is changing rapidly will have many opportunities available to them that they may not be able to get anywhere else. Since our industry has so many career legs to it you can create a custom career path while making money and seeing the Country at the same time and you will be at the forefront of the technological change which is beginning to happen right now. There has never been more opportunity in our industry and for the right mindset the future is unlimited. Trucking will always be here in one form or another and you can be part of it.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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PMTC announces Ontario Regional Seminar for October 17th

For Immediate Release


PMTC announces Ontario Regional Seminar for October 17th
Milton, ON: The PMTC’s next regional half-day seminar will be in Mississauga, Ontario, on October 17th, running from 8:30 to 11:30am. The seminar will cover three diverse topics that will provide value that fleets, and suppliers alike can take back to their workplace to help improve their operations.


An overview of National ELD Regulations and the progress of the NELT file


The PMTC has been heavily involved in stakeholder consultations with government on both the Electronic logging device file and the Mandatory Entry level Training file from the very beginning. The ELD regulation was posted in Gazette 2 and is set to come into force on June 12th of 2021. The National Entry Level Training file is currently in its consultation phase and is expected to be imbedded in the National Safety Code in January of 2020. Mike Millian, the President of the PMTC, will provide an update on what the regulations look like, and what fleets can expect to have to comply with and when.


US FMCSA Drug & Alcohol Clearing House


Branden Kearse, Privacy & Compliance Coordinator at DriverCheck, will discuss the upcoming United States Drug and Alcohol Clearing House Program that comes into effect on January 6th of 2020 for all Carriers and Drivers who operate into the US. If you are a driver or carrier do you know your responsibilities? Who has to register, where to register and other important details that will affect your compliance in the Untied States? This is the place to be to find out from the experts.

Truck pre-screening and weigh station pre-clearance


Earlier this year, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation deployed commercial vehicle pre-screening and weigh station pre-clearance technology in Ontario, in collaboration with connected truck leaders Intelligent Imaging Systems (IIS) and Drivewyze. In this presentation you will learn about the pre-screening systems now in place at a number of weigh stations in the province, which automatically scan trucks for bad brakes, weigh them while they are in motion, and which use advanced imaging systems to recognize trucks and look up inspection history and safety ratings. You will also learn about Drivewyze Pre Clear, a weigh station bypass service that permits carriers with good safety records to avoid being pulled into scales every single visit. Combined, the pre-screening and pre-clearance systems work to improve commercial truck safety and efficiency in Ontario. At the conclusion of the presentation, officials from the MTO and Drivewyze will field your questions.


Sponsorship opportunities are also available for this seminar, starting at $300.00.


The seminar is being offered as part of PMTC’s ongoing regional half day educational seminars. For more information, to register or sponsor, please call 905-827-0587, email info@pmtc.ca, go to our website at www.pmtc.ca, or CLICK HERE to register online. The cost to attend is $25.00 for a PMTC member, and $100.00 for a non-member. Location details will be provided when you register to attend.


The PMTC is also offering educational seminars in Wallace, Nova Scotia on September 18th, and in Edmonton, Alberta on October 1st. For info or to register for those events go to www.pmtc.ca. You can also call or email at the same contacts as listed above.

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A Look at Concrete Ontario

Concrete Ontario develops and administers various certification programs on behalf of the ready mix industry. Safety and best practices in production, delivery and quality control are of the upmost importance to our members in meeting and exceeding provincial and regional standards

Membership

Members enjoy exclusive certification, research and insight, business and networking opportunities, marketing and promotional support and tailored educational programs. Being a part of the association is an investment in both your company and your industry.

You can learn more at https://www.rmcao.org

concrete Ontario
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Road Safety Resources from IHSA

IHSA offers road safety programming and resources for the industry. Check out the resources here.

• https://www.ihsa.ca/pdfs/magazine/volume_19_Issue_1/new-road-safety-resources-for-employers-available-from-ihsa.pdf

• https://www.ihsa.ca/pdfs/magazine/volume_19_Issue_1/spotting-the-risks-in-trucking.pdf

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Vikram Khurana Talks Foreign Worker Program at TTSAO Conference

The Foreign Worker Pilot Program will be discussed at the 5th Annual TTSAO Conference in February 2020. Vikram Khurana will be offering a presentation on the program and how it may be the answer to bringing new workers into the industry. You won’t want to miss this presentation.

Vikram Khuranan

Presenter Profile

Vikram (Vik) Khurana is a Canadian serial entrepreneur with experience in recruiting truck drivers from international jurisdictions. Prior to becoming an entrepreneur, Vik worked with TD Bank. Since then, he has founded many businesses such as Prudential Consulting Inc., an international HR recruitment firm, Leading System Consultants, a company engaged in International Trade, amongst others. Vik has been an advisor, board member, investor, and consultant to a number of multinational companies and organizations in the field of Transportation, Information Technology and Business Process Outsourcing. Vik has also invested in a variety of start-ups as an Angel investor.

Vik is currently the Chair of Toronto Business Development Centre (TBDC) – Canada’s oldest and leading and business incubator that has been locally, nationally and internationally recognized for its efforts in nurturing the growth of new and emerging businesses in the Greater Toronto Area.

He has also served on the Board of Export Development Canada, FinDev Canada, Dean’s Council of Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA), The Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, Canada-India CEO Forum (advisory body to the Prime Ministers of Canada and India) and the Advisory Board of the Indo Canada Chamber of Commerce (entrepreneurial and small business community organization).

Among other community involvements, he was an honorary Board member at Mt. Sinai Hospital Foundation in Toronto (a well-known research hospital in Toronto), honorary Ambassador for the Province of New Brunswick, Board member of India Research and Policy Institute at University of Waterloo, Founding Member of the Canada-India Foundation, and the Board of the Museum of Hindu Civilization.

Vik is an engineering graduate from India and also holds a Masters in Business Administration, from St. Mary’s University in Halifax.

Vik is an active participant in a variety of fundraising activities for development-related causes such as schools for underprivileged children, and long-term aid initiatives for Haiti. He is a serving member of the Board of Trustees at the Canada Post Foundation which funds a host of Children’s charities across Canada.
Vik has also received the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal in recognition of his achievements and work in the community.

Check out the Agenda

TTSAO-5th-Annual-Conference-poster

Check out more about the Conference here

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Company vs Freight-Choosing a Carrier

Scrolling through a recent social media website on trucking I noticed a lot of questions from new drivers on whether to go work for a certain company based on the type of freight they haul. Sure drivers do choose carriers based on the type of freight they haul but is that the best way to choose a company that you hope to stay with for a good part of your career?

The question comes down to what do you feel is more important? In my personal opinion choosing the right company to work with far outweighs the type of freight they haul however there are many drivers out there that prefer to work with only flatbed, tanker, automobiles, or more. Much of that is what you’ve been introduced to at the beginning of your career and what has been accessible to you over time. For instance I never pulled B-trains just because I never worked for companies that had those opportunities available. I fell into the hazmat side of the industry due to the companies I worked with did a lot of that type of work. When I look back on my career I worked for good companies so don’t think I would change anything if I could.

Where you are in your career will make the difference in how you answer the question company or freight, it is kind of like the chicken and the egg scenario. I feel it comes down to how long you have been driving and the type of work you enjoy doing.

Let’s start with new drivers. If you are a brand new driver or someone that has been driving for under 5 years then you should be choosing a company to work for that has a good culture, good training / finishing program, and can offer you various types of trips or freight to gain experience. You want to gain experience on the road and if you get hired by a company that offers different types of freight even better. I worked for several companies that had a variety of freight from flatbed or steel, to refrigerated freight, and dry van before settling on a carrier that was specifically hazardous materials. You want a company with a good culture and one that is willing to be patient with someone new as they learn the ropes.

pipe truck

If you have been driving for more than 5 years then you may want to choose a company based on the freight they haul. At this time in your career you may have experienced a certain type of freight and realized you enjoy working with that type of equipment and enjoy the work. Choosing the companies that have that freight type would be the better way to choose a company but only if you know exactly what you want. Even then I would determine the type of freight I want to work with and create a list of those companies, then choose a company by their culture and other criteria.

No matter where you are in your career you want to work for a company that treats you right as an employee no matter what they haul. Choosing a company that has your type of freight, but doesn’t pay you, has you sitting waiting for freight, or has bad equipment won’t offer you a rewarding career as a professional driver. Choose wisely!

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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