Tag Archives: ttsao blog

Mike Millian On PMTC and TTSAO Industry Support for 5th Annual Conference

Private Motor Truck Council (PMTC) President Mike Millian talks about why organizations such as Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario and the PMTC need to work together to improve the transportation industry and support of the 5th annual TTSAO Conference.

Mike Millian-Private Motor Truck Council
TTSAO-5th-Annual-Conference-poster

Learn more about the conference here!

Please follow and like us:
error

Lisa Arseneau On Sponsoring the 5th Annual TTSAO Conference

Staebler Insurance’s Lisa Arseneau has been a member of the truck Training School Association of Ontario for many years and has been a keen sponsor of the conference over the years. She talks about the benefits of the conference and why she believes sponsoring the conference is important.

Lisa Areseneau on the 5th Annual Conference
TTSAO-5th-Annual-Conference-poster

Join us for the conference!

Please follow and like us:
error

Helen Thorpe on Panel for Females in Trucking at TTSAO Conference

Helen Thorpe will be one of the panel guests of the Females in Trucking Industry Panel at the 5th Annual TTSAO Conference talking about her experiences in the industry. Thorpe is the Safety, Training, and Compliance Coordinator with CAT Inc.

Helen Thorpe

Presenter Profile

Helen Thorpe came to transportation as a second career with the intent of developing her skills both on and off the road.  She has driven a variety of equipment for regional, long-haul and city fleets and was an on-road trainer before transitioning to a dispatch position, and eventually to Safety & Compliance.  After 3 years as the National Corporate Trainer, conducting road tests, developing and delivering in-house orientation and training programs for drivers, office staff and fleet maintenance; Helen has returned to an active safety role. She is the Safety, Training and Compliance Coordinator for Ontario with CAT Inc.

TTSAO-5th-Annual-Conference-poster

Learn more about the conference here

Please follow and like us:
error

Being Job Ready in 2019

What does being job ready mean in 2019 and 2020? Does it mean you have to be able to out work the person next to you? Does it mean you have to a university degree in your chosen field? Does it mean you have to have a technological background? What does job ready mean anymore?

Decades ago being job ready means you were willing to put in long hours at work and do what it takes to get the job done. Trucking companies were looking for people that didn’t mind hard work and that’s why people with a farming background succeeded so well in the industry. Being educated was for those with financial resources to get someone to college and many people had grade 10 education or less but had a work ethic that carried them through and gave them a good life. They excelled in the industry because of the farming and mechanical backgrounds allowing them to fix equipment and have pride in their work.

Today those same values are only important to the older drivers that made their careers successful through hard work. Today people are educated and focused more on work / life balance than getting the job done at all costs. As carriers struggle to change with a rolling economy and demands from a changing labour market it is changing what is attracting new drivers to the industry leaving transportation in a fluctuating market. Who are we looking for?

When you apply for a job in the market today you have to have a number of things going for you. Employers want a mix of old and new and that is very hard to find in the same person. They want someone educated and tech savvy with the old values of willing to work long hours and get the job done while being safe. Those people are out there but our industry has not changed the way things have been done for over 30 years. We haven’t shown respect for the time of the driver and we are still looking for someone to work long hours while that someone is good around equipment with a safety mindset. Unfortunately that is not what young people want in their job. What does that mean for being job ready in 2019 and 2020?

Carriers are changing to meet the demand of applicants in our industry so they can attract the talent they need. They are doing their best to add flexibility to their operations with shorter days and flexible start times. Many are now paying for detention time and offering more technology in the trucks. Different types of people are now making up many carrier teams allowing for different operation styles. Driver pay is slowly rising to help attract talent to the workplace.

Team-Drivers

What does the perfect truck driver model look like in 2020? “A truck driver that is educated with a willingness to be better,” would be my statement if I was asked. Trucking offers so many opportunities but many of them you cannot see until you are in the industry. Someone that is willing to take a little blind faith and get started in an industry that is changing rapidly will have many opportunities available to them that they may not be able to get anywhere else. Since our industry has so many career legs to it you can create a custom career path while making money and seeing the Country at the same time and you will be at the forefront of the technological change which is beginning to happen right now. There has never been more opportunity in our industry and for the right mindset the future is unlimited. Trucking will always be here in one form or another and you can be part of it.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

PMTC announces Ontario Regional Seminar for October 17th

For Immediate Release


PMTC announces Ontario Regional Seminar for October 17th
Milton, ON: The PMTC’s next regional half-day seminar will be in Mississauga, Ontario, on October 17th, running from 8:30 to 11:30am. The seminar will cover three diverse topics that will provide value that fleets, and suppliers alike can take back to their workplace to help improve their operations.


An overview of National ELD Regulations and the progress of the NELT file


The PMTC has been heavily involved in stakeholder consultations with government on both the Electronic logging device file and the Mandatory Entry level Training file from the very beginning. The ELD regulation was posted in Gazette 2 and is set to come into force on June 12th of 2021. The National Entry Level Training file is currently in its consultation phase and is expected to be imbedded in the National Safety Code in January of 2020. Mike Millian, the President of the PMTC, will provide an update on what the regulations look like, and what fleets can expect to have to comply with and when.


US FMCSA Drug & Alcohol Clearing House


Branden Kearse, Privacy & Compliance Coordinator at DriverCheck, will discuss the upcoming United States Drug and Alcohol Clearing House Program that comes into effect on January 6th of 2020 for all Carriers and Drivers who operate into the US. If you are a driver or carrier do you know your responsibilities? Who has to register, where to register and other important details that will affect your compliance in the Untied States? This is the place to be to find out from the experts.

Truck pre-screening and weigh station pre-clearance


Earlier this year, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation deployed commercial vehicle pre-screening and weigh station pre-clearance technology in Ontario, in collaboration with connected truck leaders Intelligent Imaging Systems (IIS) and Drivewyze. In this presentation you will learn about the pre-screening systems now in place at a number of weigh stations in the province, which automatically scan trucks for bad brakes, weigh them while they are in motion, and which use advanced imaging systems to recognize trucks and look up inspection history and safety ratings. You will also learn about Drivewyze Pre Clear, a weigh station bypass service that permits carriers with good safety records to avoid being pulled into scales every single visit. Combined, the pre-screening and pre-clearance systems work to improve commercial truck safety and efficiency in Ontario. At the conclusion of the presentation, officials from the MTO and Drivewyze will field your questions.


Sponsorship opportunities are also available for this seminar, starting at $300.00.


The seminar is being offered as part of PMTC’s ongoing regional half day educational seminars. For more information, to register or sponsor, please call 905-827-0587, email info@pmtc.ca, go to our website at www.pmtc.ca, or CLICK HERE to register online. The cost to attend is $25.00 for a PMTC member, and $100.00 for a non-member. Location details will be provided when you register to attend.


The PMTC is also offering educational seminars in Wallace, Nova Scotia on September 18th, and in Edmonton, Alberta on October 1st. For info or to register for those events go to www.pmtc.ca. You can also call or email at the same contacts as listed above.

Please follow and like us:
error

A Look at Concrete Ontario

Concrete Ontario develops and administers various certification programs on behalf of the ready mix industry. Safety and best practices in production, delivery and quality control are of the upmost importance to our members in meeting and exceeding provincial and regional standards

Membership

Members enjoy exclusive certification, research and insight, business and networking opportunities, marketing and promotional support and tailored educational programs. Being a part of the association is an investment in both your company and your industry.

You can learn more at https://www.rmcao.org

concrete Ontario
Please follow and like us:
error

Road Safety Resources from IHSA

IHSA offers road safety programming and resources for the industry. Check out the resources here.

• https://www.ihsa.ca/pdfs/magazine/volume_19_Issue_1/new-road-safety-resources-for-employers-available-from-ihsa.pdf

• https://www.ihsa.ca/pdfs/magazine/volume_19_Issue_1/spotting-the-risks-in-trucking.pdf

Please follow and like us:
error

Be Thankful for Trucking at Thanksgiving

As we move into another Canadian Thanksgiving I always like to remind everyone that without trucking you would have an empty table. I have always said that trucking has terrible marketing campaigns and what many refer to as a dumping ground for people with a lack of education in the past is possibly one of the most important professions on the planet. Without truck drivers there would be nothing on that Thanksgiving table.

I recently interviewed a young reporter on my podcast who has been reporting specifically on the transportation industry for the last two years. She was in her mid twenties and when I asked her what people her age thought of the trucking industry she said they didn’t find it attractive. She mentioned that many young people feel the industry is such as those movies from the 70’s where we are all shown speeding from the police, gear jamming through outlaw convoys, and drinking in the truck stops before heading out on the road. Being a product of that time and starting my trucking career in the early 80’s I can tell you the industry couldn’t be any further from those scenarios seen in many movies. Like any good movie scenario getting a turkey to the kitchen table by truck certainly isn’t as thrilling as hauling illegal beer back from Texarkana Texas with Police in chase.

Even the movies that are made to reflect a more accurate look on the industry get caught up in movie making effects and can soon turn fable over fact in a short period of time. Unfortunately these movies and television shows are there for entertainment and that causes scenarios to be embellished for ratings. My friends that are involved in some of those shows will tell stories of how producers will ask them to make a scene more interesting by re-shooting it outside of what is allowed in the regulations or cut out certain scenes to make things more dramatic.

It’s a shame that television changes reality into fiction because our industry may be very different. Since it is such an important industry to the economy of our Country it should be treated as such because we keep saying, “Without trucks there would be nothing on our shelves.” Truck drivers are expected to get deliveries made in all sorts of weather and traffic situations yet we treat them like children. Even though our industry has changed over the years our importance is still being determined by movies made for entertainment from a time that is long gone.

Thank a truck driver!

As you sit down for that fabulous meal at Thanksgiving this weekend take a moment to reflect on the items on your table. The food came from a store that was supplied by a truck. Your table ware came from stores that were supplied by trucks. For many truck drivers they aren’t sitting at a table for Thanksgiving, they are driving up and down the roadways keeping those shelves stocked for others while you enjoy your meal. Thank a truck driver and Happy Thanksgiving.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Company vs Freight-Choosing a Carrier

Scrolling through a recent social media website on trucking I noticed a lot of questions from new drivers on whether to go work for a certain company based on the type of freight they haul. Sure drivers do choose carriers based on the type of freight they haul but is that the best way to choose a company that you hope to stay with for a good part of your career?

The question comes down to what do you feel is more important? In my personal opinion choosing the right company to work with far outweighs the type of freight they haul however there are many drivers out there that prefer to work with only flatbed, tanker, automobiles, or more. Much of that is what you’ve been introduced to at the beginning of your career and what has been accessible to you over time. For instance I never pulled B-trains just because I never worked for companies that had those opportunities available. I fell into the hazmat side of the industry due to the companies I worked with did a lot of that type of work. When I look back on my career I worked for good companies so don’t think I would change anything if I could.

Where you are in your career will make the difference in how you answer the question company or freight, it is kind of like the chicken and the egg scenario. I feel it comes down to how long you have been driving and the type of work you enjoy doing.

Let’s start with new drivers. If you are a brand new driver or someone that has been driving for under 5 years then you should be choosing a company to work for that has a good culture, good training / finishing program, and can offer you various types of trips or freight to gain experience. You want to gain experience on the road and if you get hired by a company that offers different types of freight even better. I worked for several companies that had a variety of freight from flatbed or steel, to refrigerated freight, and dry van before settling on a carrier that was specifically hazardous materials. You want a company with a good culture and one that is willing to be patient with someone new as they learn the ropes.

pipe truck

If you have been driving for more than 5 years then you may want to choose a company based on the freight they haul. At this time in your career you may have experienced a certain type of freight and realized you enjoy working with that type of equipment and enjoy the work. Choosing the companies that have that freight type would be the better way to choose a company but only if you know exactly what you want. Even then I would determine the type of freight I want to work with and create a list of those companies, then choose a company by their culture and other criteria.

No matter where you are in your career you want to work for a company that treats you right as an employee no matter what they haul. Choosing a company that has your type of freight, but doesn’t pay you, has you sitting waiting for freight, or has bad equipment won’t offer you a rewarding career as a professional driver. Choose wisely!

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Please follow and like us:
error

Join us for the TTSAO 5th Annual Conference

The TTSAO Launches a video trailer for their 5th Annual Conference. Check out the trailer and join us for the conference in 2020.

TTSAO 5th Annual Conference Trailer
TTSAO-5th-Annual-Conference-poster

Join us!

Please follow and like us:
error