Tag Archives: TTSAO Carrier Group

Linamar to host TTSAO Carrier Group and General Meetings

May 21, 2019

REMINDER – Last Chance to Register: The TTSAO Carrier Group will be holding a meeting on Thursday May 23, 2019 at Linamar Corporation in Guelph at 700 Woodlawn Road from 8:30am to 9:30am.  The meeting is free of charge to attend and is open to all carriers, for hire and private.  The agenda will include an overview of the new TTSAO auditing and oversight program as well as a proposed marketing initiative for recruiting people into the training industry. 

Following the auditing and overview portion of the meeting the TTSAO Carrier Group will be featuring a session called “How We Do It, A Carrier’s Perspective”. This session will have three for hire and private carriers each presenting on recruiting, interviewing, road testing and on-boarding entry level drivers. In this session carrier representatives will share their thoughts on how they are recruiting, and on-boarding entry level students recently graduated from commercial driver training schools. 

After the 3 presentations the carriers will gather as a panel and there will be an open Q/A moderated by Guy Broderick, Chairman of the TTSAO Carrier Group.  

During the general session an update will also be provided on the recently introduced TTSAO auditing and oversight program which is managed by the TTSAO Insurance Group. This recently implemented auditing process, for both new prospective members and existing TTSAO members, who operate commercial truck driving schools has been launched with success. Lisa Arseneau, Chairperson of the TTSAO Insurance Group, will provide an overview of the program to-date.

The meeting for the TTSAO Carrier Group is for Carriers only is scheduled for 8:30 – 9:30am

The general session will take place from 10 am to noon and is open to anyone in the industry who would like to attend. 

To register please email ttsao@ttsao.com or call 705-280-5577.

For more information contact:

Charlie Charalambous – Director of Communications and Public Relations, TTSAO – ccharalambous@isbglobalservices.com  or (905) 699 – 8837

Kim Richardson – President, TTSAO – KRTS office – 1-800-771-8171 x 201 or cell – 905-512-0254 or by email at kim@ttsao.com

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Become a top brand in the industry

If you are looking to improve your career for 2019 then becoming a top driver then improving your brand may be the way to do it. There are three areas that defines you as a brand and creates the opportunities that will take you forward in your career. If you want to build your personal brand then you need to focus specifically on these three areas. 

Area 1: Attitude

Attitude is the first and most important item of your personal brand. If this area is not in check you can say goodbye to the rest of the program. I have interviewed hundreds of people on my podcast and classes and attitude always comes up as the main factor in the success of ones career in the transportation industry. Your attitude reflects how you think about the job, your carrier, your customers, and the most important, yourself! Attitude makes you want to try harder, be better, and be thorough in what you do.  That makes you do better inspections, dress appropriately, and look professional in your dealings with others. If your attitude is not up to check this is the first thing you should be working on in 2019. 

Area 2: Time Management

Once your attitude has been adjusted (sorry I had to say it) then time management is the next crucial area to work on. You can be the best person in the world, but if you are late to all your customer deliveries then you will not make it in this industry. Time management isn’t just about being on time but how well organized you are, how you plan for delays, and how you plan your trips for maximum profits. Time management encompasses everything in the organizational sector of transportation. Being known as a driver that is on-time and organized can increase your brand ten-fold. Work on this area if you want to be a successful in the trucking industry. 

Truck on highway

Area 3: Teamwork

On a truck everything needs to work in conjunction with other components for a truck to run down the road. If the wheel doesn’t roll when you release the brakes you would have a hard time moving the truck. The same thing goes for teamwork in this industry. If the whole company is not working together a carrier will not be very successful. The system works as a whole from the carriers sales force, to the planning committee, dispatch, and the drivers. If the team doesn’t work together, communicate, and deliver on time everyone will be out of business. Many drivers see themselves as independent components to a carrier but they really are a vital part of a team. Take any member out of the team equation and you will have a flat tire so to speak. 

There is a lot going on in today’s transportation industry and one way to stand out is to be known as a professional driver. Drivers have to start working on their personal brands if they want to be in a position to work for the best carriers in the industry. Being the top in your fleet will offer you positions that require the best professional drivers. Over my career trying to be my best has provided work at great carriers, opportunities for advancement, and a career I am very proud of. Oh sure there have been mistakes along the way but at the end my brand is what provided the benefits of a good career. I just had to work on my brand. Focus on the three areas and you will find success as a professional driver in today’s trucking industry.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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You’ve Got to Give a Company a Year!

I was reading some questions lately about drivers looking for jobs and as I went through a few posts I began to notice a disturbing trend. Many of the drivers asking the questions were asking where to go to drive hauling a certain type of trailer. What was comical is that if you went down the list and read every question many were contradicting each other. The drivers may as well just switched companies. The trend I noticed was that the drivers all were fairly new drivers and many of them were looking to change companies after only 6 months of driving time. What these drivers may no realize is how much they are hurting their employment record by moving companies within a year of starting in their career. You’ve got to give a company a year as a new truck driver.

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

The first two years of your career are critical to success as a new driver and the best thing you can do for your career is learn all you can and work in a stable environment. Forget the money, forget the lanes of operation, forget everything. Drive safely and learn all you can about the job is the best way to have success in the industry.

Why stay for at least a year?

What many new drivers may not realize is that there are many factors that work together from insurance to safety to experience and if you can stay at a company for at least two years before moving to another company it helps your employment record dramatically. Once a driver has two years of experience the insurance companies look at that driver as an experienced driver and they become easier to insure. Two years is also the amount of time that it takes for a driver to learn the basic skills of the job and be self sufficient in their position. When a driver moves from company to company within the two year mark it becomes a red flag to many companies that this driver isn’t stable and it will cause them to question investing in that driver.

What looks better on an employment record? A driver that has been with a company for two years and is now looking for an improved opportunity? Or a driver that has had three jobs in the last two years and is still looking for more opportunities?

This is why it is important for new drivers to investigate companies properly when first getting started in the industry. Start your career with a reputable carrier that will offer the training and help you get the experience required to have a solid career as a driver. Don’t worry about making money, just gain as much experience as you can and stay stable at your job. After two years your options will open dramatically for the new driver and you will have enough knowledge to know what type of job you want in the industry.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Tips for Evaluating Your Trucking Job Contract

Remember the days when you went to apply for a job and the employer had you sit at a desk and fill out a generic one page application? Your young hands shaking as you try to get your printing neat enough for someone else to read and your mind focused enough to remember your social insurance number. Then you reached the part where it asked for your experience and you tried to think of everything you have ever done that remotely related to the job you’re applying for. My first job was like that as I applied to a fast food restaurant where washing the dishes at home became my closest experience to working for a restaurant. I did get the job as a dish washer!

Today things are quite different. You have resumes that have to be provided in a certain format or length with background check information to be verified by the employer. Contracts are now normal and negotiating an employment contract is a regular part of the process for accepting a job. We often think of contracts as something that only happens in business or high level projects but everyday applications such as a truck driver position have to deal with contracts as well. This is important to understand because you could be agreeing to things you don’t understand or be leaving benefits on the table.

This happened to me when I went to work for a global company. I had never really dealt with employment contracts and didn’t understand that contracts were negotiable. I accepted the contract and found out later through discussions that other team members got other benefits because they negotiated them. For me it may have meant another week of vacation each year. Contracts are now a normal part of the process and it is important that you read and understand them to protect you and your benefits. You may not have to get a lawyer involved but you should know what you are signing and agreeing to so I have offered you a few basic tips below.

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Read the Contract

I used to work closely with a company that was mostly owner operator based and management would relate horror stories that owner operators didn’t understand what was expected of them because they didn’t read their contracts and were then surprised when items were taken off their statements that they hadn’t agreed to. The fact was that they had agreed to it and would have known that if they had read their contract. READ EVERY WORD!

Have Someone Else Read Your Contract

Contracts have lots of legalese in them and it can be hard to understand the legal language sometimes. Always have someone else read the contract as well and if you still don’t understand it find a lawyer or paralegal to help you.

Evaluate Every Line Item

It is very hard to read contracts or other important documents on a phone or tablet. If possible always print out or receive a paper copy and go through it line by line. I like to print off a paper copy and highlight all the items to be changed and add notes in the margin of items to be reviewed with the employer. Make a spare copy for marking if you only received one as your primary copy.

Sleep On It

Never feel pressured to sign a contract on the spot. If you are asked to sign it without reading it then run. Most employers will send the contract ahead of time or send it home with you for review. Read the contract and then sleep on it overnight and read it again the next day. If you need longer because you need to get a lawyer to review it then do so and let them know you are having someone else review it. Realize that a contract can be a starting point for negotiations and doesn’t need to be looked at as the end point of an agreement unless you have signed it. Once you sign it you can’t go back and negotiate.

Contracts are becoming a normal part of business and employment processes. Understanding the benefits or issues with your particular contract application is important for success in the future. Ensure you read your contracts and all the best.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Making our Industry Attractive to Millennials

How do we make our industry attractive to young people? Recruiting events are in high gear this Spring with multiple events happening each month starting in February and continuing into early Summer. Having attended many of these events across the Province I can tell you from first hand experience that the events are well attended with many people looking at the trucking industry. The question, is it enough to attract people to your team?

The argument is still out on whether there is an actual driver shortage or a qualified driver shortage in the industry? The real question is how do we make this job attractive to the next generation? With older generations cool trucks had a lot to do with it, following in your Father’s footsteps, or a love of working with machinery would be a big draw to starting a career in transportation. Those avenues have dried up as of late with fewer people coming in from those areas and more immigrant workers looking for a future in Canada.

There was a recent article in Truck News talking about the image of trucking and what we need to do to attract the younger generation. It talked about demographics and the future of the industry if we don’t do something to make the industry more attractive and soon. You can read the article here – https://www.trucknews.com/human-resources/you-really-have-some-work-to-do/1003090712/

Having Millennials myself there is a difference into what they want and what trucking can offer. Many younger people are looking for that lifestyle balance which is tough in trucking. Older generations have put working in front of many other areas of their lives and the younger generation doesn’t want to do that. By focusing more on lifestyle it is taking them longer to grow up for some and even harder to get into a career. This is why the gaming industry is so attractive, it’s what they do. Add on the pressure of social media where young people can see another person their age make millions by creating a YouTube channel and they find that even more attractive. Who can blame them?

Millennials- how to attract them to your team?

When we turn back to the transportation industry we see exactly the opposite of all of those things. We see long hours at work, we see a lifestyle that doesn’t offer the compensation or the fun of what young people are doing now. it’s also not where their friends are heading. Even though the career steps are there young people don’t see how the hard work is going to better their lives even though we as a different generation have lived it and try to tell them about it. The real question is what are we doing to address those issues and make trucking look sexy? How are we going to offer a work / lifestyle balance, earn a decent income, and offer an opportunity to be a star or do work that is cool? If you can implement those items into your recruiting I believe you will attract young people, I know it is easier said than done!

My suggestions are as follows:

  • We need to get create an industry where the hours are shorter such as a 40 hour work week.
  • Change the compensation and career towards a skilled trade so there is career progression.
  • Show the technology side of the business and the types of jobs needed in the future.
  • Show how cool the work is through it’s independence and travel.
  • Improve the trucking image as a whole to be more attractive to the younger generation.

Do you have those elements in your recruiting campaign? If there is a way of creating them then you will be a front runner for success.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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How much is a load worth versus a life?

You’re a new driver and told by dispatch, “Get it there no matter what!” You’re running late due to problems on the road and the boss needs to make the customer happy and wants you to push through the night. You didn’t properly load your truck and have had load problems the trip from the shipper so you are focusing on other elements and not your driving. You’re in-experience, in-attention, and job in-securities all come together at once causing a life changing experience and you now look down a road of loss potential and life as a whole.

This week the driver of the Humboldt Bus crash was sentenced for the trucking accident that happened back in March 2018. A young driver with only three weeks of experience was driving through the night having trouble with the tarp on his load, he missed warning signs to a dangerous road crossing, and hit a bus with a hockey team killing 16 people and injuring many more. The team was from a tiny town in Western Canada named Humboldt and the surrounding area and this crash has devastated the town, the Province, and the Country. What’s worse is that it could have been prevented.

The driver and company were found guilty. The company was suspended and the driver charged with 8 years in prison, not allowed to drive for a number of years afterward, and may even be facing deportation. The driver had three weeks of training before being put on the road with a truck and load that many people with years of experience wouldn’t have been given.

So the question is, “How much is a load worth versus a life?”

Truck Crash

The decision on how to move forward is always held with the driver as they are the last point of contact between company and load and this is why it is extremely important for drivers to know what they’re doing and the consequences of their actions if they decide to move forward. When a driver is new they are constantly trying to remember their training and hoping they don’t have problems. Knowing how to do things properly and not being afraid to ask questions when unsure of a process should be part of your line of defence while on the road. Keeping your job by overriding safety precautions and training is a sure way to get yourself in trouble on the road as we’ve seen here.

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The driver from Humboldt will have 8 years to think about his actions and evaluate where he went wrong. Even worse is that he will see the faces of the victims in his mind for the rest of his life. Many drivers that have been in an accident with casualties never drive again. Many times I talk about knowing what type of driver you want to be and this is where the “rubber hits the road”so to speak. Not knowing your priorities as a driver can change your life and the lives of those around you. The question you need to ask yourself every time an issue comes up with a load is, “ How much is this load worth compared to a life?” I hope you choose the correct answer because the life you are thinking about may be your own.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Should you switch carriers for the money?

The fight for drivers is becoming intense as wages go up to attract talent. With salaries over $80,000 being promised by some carriers drivers are starting to perk up and look for work else where even though they may have been happy at their existing carrier.

I was reading a question the other day in an article where a spouse was looking for suggestions from other drivers as to whether her husband should move from one carrier to another as he was the sole income earner for the family. He was working for a good carrier, home every night, had seniority, Union support, benefits, etc. I won’t say the name but it is a well respected carrier in the industry.

As a single family income he of course is looking to make as much money as possible and feels he has reached his income potential with his current carrier. He is seeing the big offers by other carriers, applied for the job, and received an offer. His dilemma now, does he take the job? The new carrier is offering an over the road job and requires him to be away 5-6 days per week. The family is okay with that but will he really make more money?

speeding-truck

This is an important question that people don’t always think through because the salary potential gets in the way. We see the dollar signs and that can cloud our judgement causing us to make the wrong decision. Let’s break it down a bit more.

First the salary you see in an advertisement is often an average or above average salary of what is possible for a driver. If all the stars align you could make “X” number of dollars. It is against the law to put out false advertising so you could make that income if everything is right. The world of transportation doesn’t work that way however and each driver has their own work pace. Some drivers are slower, some have more experience, some have better travel lanes, some have certain equipment, so there are many variables when it comes to how much income a person can make even in the same fleet.

Delays are the next variable that can really hurt the income stated by a carrier. If you get delayed for long periods of time that can affect your earnings. Expenses on the road can take a large chunk of income from a driver. Like the driver above he was home every night, slept in his own bed, showered at home, and possibly took his lunch to work each day. If he takes the job over the road he may now have to pay for showers, buy meals on the road, and buy personal items and equipment for his truck. These are all expenses that many times comes out of the drivers own pocket and income.

If you leave one carrier to drive for another carrier that may give you a raise of $10,000 but if you have to put out more money for expenses you really aren’t ahead of the game. You’re just taking that money and giving it to the truck stop or other vendor. Do your homework if looking at new opportunities as they may not always be what they seem. It’s what you want for a career that’s important, not just the money!

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Truck Training is a Relationship

The TTSAO (Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario) had their 4th annual conference at the end of February with a lot of good information shared with attendees. There were new awards, many great discussions around truck training and how schools or carriers can work closely together. Check out the conference recap here.

A panel discussion led by Geoff Topping of Challenger Motor Freight and consisting on Leanne Quail of Paul Quail Transport, Matt Richardson of Kim Richardson Transportation Specialists Inc, Garth Pitzel of Bison Transport, and Philip Fletcher of Commercial Heavy Equipment Training talked about carrier and school relationships and how it affects students coming into the industry. One of the areas that I thought was interesting about the panel discussion was the fact that relationships between carrier, school, and student were extremely important in the success of a student becoming a professional driver.

Geoff-Topping

Schools are working closely with carriers and developing strong relationships because they understand that carriers are playing a major part in truck training even if they don’t provide it. I have always said to new drivers that their first point of contact should be with a carrier of choice to find out what type of training they require and if they work with certain schools. This allows a student to get training knowing they are able to be hired once they graduate from the school.

TTSAO-School-banner-2018

Good certified schools also understand that truck training is more than just passing a test and that training is a foundation for your whole career. Having that relationship with a carrier allows a school to prepare that student for the carrier style of operation so the student is successful at the end of the training.

Best-practices-panel

Carriers are investing in a student when they sign on and much of their orientation is focused on competency and skills training when a new driver starts with the fleet. The carrier’s job is to groom that driver once they have the basic skills and working with certain schools is offering that comfort that a new driver has been trained to certain standards. Although many carriers have formal mentor programs they know that mentorship and training happens best when it is a natural fit between the new driver and trainer. Many of us can remember our mentor or trainer when we got started hopefully as good memories. Carriers realize this and are focusing on soft skills and the customer service side of the improving a driver. Trust is a main factor in a relationship between a school, student, and carrier. Careers, safety, and the future depend on it.

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As a new student or driver it is important for you to spend time building that relationship with a school and a carrier. Go to events and meet the recruiters. Call carriers and find out which school they work with in your area and why. Talk to the schools about their training programs and which carriers they work with to evaluate what job types are available. Start that relationship before you even choose a training provider and it will help streamline the process of becoming a truck driver. Not only will that save you time, resources, and money, but will also fast track you into a quality carrier right from the start. If you need help getting started then www.ttsao.com is a good place to start.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO Kicks off 4th Annual Conference

The TTSAO (Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario) is kicking off their 4th annual conference today in Mississauga Ontario with a full agenda for two days taking truck training to new heights and informing the industry of developments in training. Last year even the general meeting had a full audience as people arrived and attended meetings by the various groups within TTSAO.

TTSAO-2019

The conference will begin today with a Board of Directors meeting at 10:30 am to welcome in the new board members and discuss issues with the change over. After lunch meetings with the insurance group and carrier groups will have open meetings discussing their goals and achievements for the year and which projects are in motion. Last year the Insurance Group had a panel discussion with questions from the audience on particular issues to do with insurance and the industry.

TTSAO December 11th Meeting

Once the two specialized groups complete their meetings there will be a general meeting for everyone to update members and those in attendance about the focus for the TTSAO for the upcoming year. The day will finish with a visit to the trade show area and a cocktail hour to close out the day.

Day two of the conference is where the real meat of the program lies with a full day of programming starting off with breakfast and opening remarks from the TTSAO President and Chairperson.

After welcome messages and updates the program moves into full swing starting off with a presentation from Kimberly Biback of Sharp Transportation on social media, a panel discussion on training issues, and a panel on how other associations work with TTSAO round out the morning with trade show breaks in between.

After lunch is when the newest development begins with the 1st ever Instructor of the Year Award being presented by PayBright and the TTSAO. This is the first time the award has been presented and will be awarded to an instructor that has shown professionalism in training and meets the criteria set out for the award. The instructor must be employed by a TTSAO school or associated carrier. You can learn more about the award here.

PayBright-logo

After the award ceremony there will be a health break with Healthy Trucker and Michael Thompson of ISB will offer a presentation on technology that helps determine where a student fits best in the industry. Closing remarks from the conference committee and president will round out the day and close the conference.

The conference has been sold out in past years and the membership grows each year. The conference has been well run in the past and is sure to be a hit again this year. If you were unable to make it this year watch for post coverage of the event at www.ttsao.com

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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What Type of Experience Do You Need as a New Driver?

A friend of mine graduated from a school with a new commercial drivers licence. He has completed training, did well on his test, and is now looking for a position with a company. He has been told by many carriers that he needs at least one year of experience before they will send him over the road to drive across the country. He has a couple of opportunities that would take a chance on hiring him, but he is not sure he is ready to go out on the highway. He says he prefers to stay close to home and has the opportunity to work at a local job picking up garbage for a local waste company. His dilemma is if he accepts the job at the waste company will that experience go towards having one year of driving experience? My answer is yes and no!

There is no right or wrong answer to the question of experience because much of it depends on the equipment, company, and type of work you are involved in. Let’s break it down so you can see how the experience will help or not help my friend.

Getting the job at the waste company will offer him some experience in the industry. He will be around equipment and will be conducting items like pre-trip inspections, city driving experience, and possibly offer advancement in the industry. What he will lack at the waste company depending on the equipment is the experience of driving a tractor trailer as much of the equipment in those types of operations is class “D” Straight truck equipment. He may not be gaining experience that will help him later transition to being an over the road highway driver. Once he moves to another job after a year he may be even more rusty because he hasn’t used those driving skills for a long time. After a year in a straight truck companies will still look at his experience as a new driver so he may not be so far ahead. He would need additional training.

Man driving tractor

If my friend was to go directly to work for someone that operates the type of equipment he was trained on such as a tractor trailer he would be gaining the experience for the equipment he was trained on. He could find a local company if that’s what he chooses and that would be a great way to gather experience for the open road. He would have more options after that year because he would have verifiable experience on over the road equipment.

It is important to gain experience directly after your training for that training to be engraved in your mind and become something that is routine. There are many licenced drivers that have never turned a wheel because they have decided to go in another career direction after training. They may be licenced but they aren’t experienced and are effectively at the starting point again. I am a firm believer in a step type of program for new drivers but it is important that program includes the type of equipment they were trained on. Look for experience in your trained type of equipment and it will work towards that experience marker.

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for truck drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit

www.ttsao.com

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