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Are you a fuel-efficient driving champion?

Fuel efficiency is important to any size fleet. Train your drivers to be fuel champions.

SmartDriver for Highway Trucking now offers:

• Free online training
for fleet drivers and
owner‑operators
• Classroom-based
instruction at a driving
school near you
• An On-Road Practicum
to test and perfect
your skills
• A Certificate of Achievement
to confirm that you are a
fuel‑efficiency champion

About SmartDriver

To learn more, visit the Natural Resources Canada FleetSmart website at: www.FleetSmart.NRCan.gc.ca

SDHT 07-Poster_2018-01-10

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Is there a sweet spot for saving fuel?

Did you know you’ll get the best fuel efficiency by operating in your engine’s “sweet spot” – generally in the 1200 to 1400 RPM range for
recent model heavy-duty trucks?

To learn more, visit the Natural Resources Canada FleetSmart website at: www.FleetSmart.NRCan.gc.ca

Print Version-SDHT 06-FactSheet #3_2018-01-10

SDHT 06-FactSheet #3_2018-01-10

 

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Do Your Homework When Searching for a Carrier

I have been in this industry for a long time and I am always amazed at some of the issues I hear going on within the industry like the issue many drivers face called “Bus and Dump.” I was looking through some articles on the industry when I came across this article from Fleet Owner Publication on “Bus and Dump” which is a practice some carriers use in the United States to recruit drivers to their team. I have never heard of the practice in Canada, but apparently this is a practice that has been going on for some time in the U.S. So what is “Bus and Dump?”

 

“Bus and Dump” is the practice of hiring drivers through an online application form on a website with a promise to hire, offering them travel arrangements to attend orientation, and then once they arrive making an excuse to turn them away.

You’re the driver and you want to get a new job in the transportation industry. You fill out an online application and get a message or phone call from the recruiter telling you that you have been accepted for the position. The carrier sends you a bus ticket to arrive in orientation at an arranged date and time and you accept. You head out to the location that is often across the Country and are excited to start with a new company. When you arrive the carrier tells you for some reason that you are no longer required and sets you on your way. You now have to find your own way home with no money or accommodations. You can read the actual article by clicking this website link. https://www.fleetowner.com/driver-management/bus-and-dump-drivers-expose-industrys-dirty-practice

depressed-person

How do you protect yourself against the “Bus and Dump” practice?

The first step is to do your homework on the carrier and make sure they are legitimate. There are plenty of jobs available in the industry for the right candidates so there is no reason to go to carriers that are participating in unethical practices. Know who you are applying to and make sure they are a reputable company. You can do this by following the same format of investigation the carrier uses to hire you.

Investigating a Carrier

  • Only apply to carriers through reputable job websites or carrier specific websites
  • Make sure you understand if you are going for a first time interview or have actually been hired.
  • Research the carrier profile and safety record by adding their name to searches on websites like www.fmcsa.dot.gov or Google and review the information about them.
  • Talk to three references about them from drivers or other people in the industry
  • Have a discussion via phone or video with the person hiring you and find out any pertinent information required, such as dress for the job, equipment required, etc.
  • If traveling far from home have a letter of intent to hire from the carrier in writing. This may come in handy should you have to take legal action at a later date.
  • Be honest about any convictions or other information that may cause issues in the hiring process.
  • Have a your own original copies of all documents such as abstracts, licence, and so on should they be altered by someone else in the process
  • Take enough money for accommodations and travel back home if required.
  • Keep in contact with family or friends about your whereabouts and progress.

You can’t stop a carrier from unscrupulous methods of hiring drivers but you don’t have to participate in the practice. This is why many industry professionals caution new students on accepting the first job that comes along. Do your homework, I can’t say that enough! Reputable carriers don’t participate in such practices as “Bus and Dump” and you shouldn’t either.

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Improve fuel efficiency with these facts from SmartDriver

The SmartDriver for Highway Trucking (SDHT) training program helps heavy‑duty truck drivers improve their fuel efficiency by up to 35%. In addition to protecting personal income and industry competitiveness, SDHT benefits include reduced
greenhouse gas emissions, less vehicle wear and tear, and increased safety.

Check out the fact sheet

SDHT 04-FactSheet #1_2018-01-10

PDF Version for print or better viewing

SDHT 04-FactSheet #1_2018-01-10

 

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We need to change the stigma of trucking to the mainstream population!

Is it time for us to take trucking to the mainstream population?

We have changed the regulations countless times since the 70’s, implemented training programs to get your licence, and created certified strategies for new drivers. We have talked about how store shelves would be empty if trucks didn’t deliver product to stores or if trucks stopped running all together. Yet we still have the same stigma that we had in the 70’s. That truck drivers drive trucks because they can’t do anything else. I used to think this was a North American problem until I came across a video on Polish drivers.

The video was produced to show people the challenging job of driving a truck but with comments from people who don’t understand the industry. The video focuses on one driver showing family issues, traffic issues, loading issues, and other challenges such as long hours on the job or missing important family events.

Here is a look at the video

Anyone in the industry knows that the job of driving a truck is not only demanding but a job that requires extreme skill, knowledge, and dedication to safety in order to perform well. Yet that same stigma still holds true to this day in many areas of our industry. The industry still struggles with being a job of last resort, the view that the drivers are drug induced maniacs, and the media reporting on the increasing amount of truck crashes happening on the roadways. We in the industry know this is wrong and not what the industry has to offer.

When I started in the industry in the early 80’s the stigma was the same. In fact the saying was if you can shift gears you would make a good truck driver. Many of my fellow truck drivers had little education and I remember applications back in 1980 reading that applicants must have at least grade ten education. A couple mainstream movies in the late 70’s and a push from the education sector to get more people in post education didn’t help our image either.

Today things are still the same even though I know drivers making $80,000 per year. We still struggle with the amount of time away with family, yet I know people in other industries that are away just as much, miss just as many family events, and struggle with stigma and image issues in their own industries.

There are many benefits to being in the transportation industry but how do we change the stigma of the industry? I think the change will have to come from above our industry although I think we can be doing more to change the image. I think it will take a change in how we look at employment in general and instead of talking about the salary or education of a job we talk about what type of person fits a certain job. For instance I would be a terrible mechanic because I don’t enjoy fixing things, but that certainly doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with being one. Let’s put the employment options on a level playing field instead of the current hierarchy with everyone trying to get the top job of a banker or doctor. A truck driver is a well respected profession and one that most people couldn’t handle if it did pay millions of dollars.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Clean up Safety to Recruit New Drivers

All of transportation is wondering how to recruit new drivers to the industry, it’s an ongoing issue that many face. We’ve seen wages rising which is good, trucks getting more comfortable which is good, and more events going on with opportunities to learn more about the industry which is also good. We talk about the people in the industry and the various opportunities for growth and work for the future, so why do we have such a hard time bringing people into the industry? I blame it on the six o’clock news.

If you have been in this industry for any length of time you will know how good this industry is and that what you hear or see on the television is untrue, that we are not dangerous animals on the road. We also know that many of the incidents happening on the roads are not the fault of the truck driver. I know we can all agree on that. Yet often that same person who is thinking of looking at driving as a possible occupation sees the six o’clock news with another truck crash and wonders if they will even survive and come back to their families. We need to clean up safety to help attract new people to the industry. No matter how high we raise wages or how comfortable we make our trucks people won’t be attracted to work that may cause them harm.

Train-wreck

How do we do this? Well if I had the answer to that I would have changed the World already. Unfortunately I don’t have an answer that would solve that problem in one swoop. I do have some ideas that would help, but how well they could be implemented would be another thing.

First we need to focus on education and not just for drivers, but for the motoring public at large. Every driving test should have questions regarding commercial vehicles and all driving programs whether for commercial vehicles or not should include training on driving around large vehicles. Anyone that tows a trailer with a non-commercial vehicle such as a camper trailer should have to go and get a permit showing they have passed a knowledge test driving with a trailer and have an hours of service component to it.

We often hear about accidents on the roads but we rarely see the outcome of the investigations to show whether it was the fault of the truck driver or car drivers in incidents. A truck may be in an incident but that doesn’t mean it is their fault. We need to show the public the whole story so they see the actual statistics as we do in the industry.

This point will be the hardest to implement but why haven’t we added HOV lanes for commercial vehicles. There should be a separate lane for commercial vehicles allowing them to move through high traffic areas without cars playing their games on the highway. That would take us a long way in improving our safety if many of the consumer vehicles are the problem. The movement of goods should be a priority in this Country. We keep telling the public how important trucks are to the economy, maybe we should start to show them.

These of course are just my ideas but I thought I would offer them up as food for thought. We are always looking to improve safety and this may be a start. We all need to do our part to make the roads safer.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO announces date for 2019 Conference

The TTSAO has announced the date fror the TTSAO 2019 conference and will be opening up registrations in the near future. keep an eye out for more information on the 4th annual conference.

ttsao conference 2019 ad-Save the Date

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Don’t End Your Career Before It Begins

As I read an article the other day on the Humboldt tragedy I was very sad. I was sad for a community that lost so many good people, I was sad for the driver that has not only lost his career but much of his future once he is sentenced, and I am sad for the transportation industry that I know with so many good hard working people in it that have been scarred again by a situation causing such grief.

We still haven’t heard the details of the horrible crash that killed 16 members of the Humboldt Broncos hockey team, but after an extensive investigation the driver was charged with 29 charges ranging from dangerous driving causing death to dangerous driving causing bodily injury. If convicted of all charges this young driver will be in jail for many years. You can read the article at Truck News at https://www.trucknews.com/health-safety/twenty-nine-charges-laid-on-truck-driver-involved-in-humboldt-broncos-bus-collision/1003086645/

It is very sad to see a good community lose so many of their members and I am sad for the driver who’s life has changed for the future. All we have now are lessons to be learned from this tragedy so that it doesn’t happen again. We haven’t heard all the details but whatever the reason for the crash I am sure the driver didn’t mean to have this happen. Incidents like this can change a driver forever, it’s much like war vets with Post Traumatic Syndrome Disorder where this driver will live with this tragedy his whole life.

 

When I was a young driver another driver that worked for one of our customers had his young son along with him for the summer and while the boy was opening the doors of the trailer he got caught between the truck and the dock and was killed. That driver never drove again.

A couple years ago a driver that had a stellar 40 year career was driving down the 401 when someone on the side of the road acting as though they were fixing a car stepped into the path of the passing truck killing themselves. The driver had no chance of prevention and was devastated ending his driving career.

In all of these incidents the drivers lived, but also died with the victims. There careers over no matter how experienced and their lives changed for the future. The memories will always be there of that night and although those affected may be able to get help to cope they will never truly be the same.

depressed-person

How do we combat these tragedies? In some cases we can’t do it alone as some factors are out of our hands, but as a new or experienced driver what you can do is to keep learning, keep alert, and pay attention to the task at hand. Shut off the distractions in the cab, focus on the road, and do proper trip planning keeping communications open. Don’t end what can be a great career because of inattention or trying to make a quick buck by pushing a mile. The decisions you make may last for a lifetime. Our thoughts and prayers are with those affected by this tragedy.

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Operation Safe Driver Week needs to be for more than just trucks

Operation Safe Driver Week started on Monday with enforcement officers stepping up patrols looking for dangerous drivers on the roadways. My question is do we really need all these road safety weeks? Is this really helping us be safer?

Industry publication Truck News put out some alarming statistics about the industry noting that there is a 38% increase in accidents on the roadways in Ontario with an 800% increase in the Northeast regions. You can read the actual article here https://www.trucknews.com/health-safety/opp-concerned-about-truck-crash-rates/1003086757/. The article goes on to offer inspection statistics and information on enforcement efforts but are we getting better?

If you haven’t noticed we seem to have more safety inspection programs, more regulations, more education, yet we seem to be going in the opposite direction and honestly I don’t think more truck inspections will change the behaviour of the motoring public.

The 401 corridor is said to be one of the busiest highways in North America rivaling places like Los Angeles and Atlanta Georgia. That may not mean much to you but I still remember the morning in my driving career when I arrived in Atlanta Georgia in the middle of rush hour and said to myself I had never seen so many cars on the road, it was like a sea of vehicles. That was twenty years ago so I can only imagine what Atlanta is like today and for the 401 to be busier than Atlanta is a scary thought.

Trucks in mountains

Our roadways are so busy now with everyone in a hurry to get to their destination that the chance of them being caught driving distracted, speeding, or doing anything else unlawful is a small percentage so people do it anyway, we will never have enough enforcement officers to catch everyone. By focusing on commercial vehicles enforcement officers have a directed focus and since trucks can cause a lot of damage stopping those crashes can lower fatalities in a big way. Now I certainly am not saying that truck drivers are the cause of such accidents I just think that is how enforcement agencies have tried to attack the number of accidents on our roadways. The question now becomes will it work and my gut instinct tells me it won’t.

There seems to be a push back from older drivers to get people to start at the bottom of the ladder and learn the industry from the ground up. That’s the way we used to do so in the eighties when you would work on the dock, then wash the trucks, then learn to drive. I think we can all agree that program won’t work with the current driver shortage so what do we do?

I myself believe there needs to be a mix of the old and the new. Let’s use technology to our advantage and mix in the values from former years. Let’s educate the whole population and not just one group and expect them to lower the accident rate for everyone. I don’t have all the answers but here are a few suggestions to get the conversation started:

  • Add safety questions for trucks on every driver test and include general truck training in new driver classes.
  • Add technology to vehicles that will block cellular signals so people can’t use their phones with the exception of emergencies while the vehicle is in motion.
  • Create training programs where professionalism in the industry is part of the curriculum and is trained upon.

We all need to be working on ourselves when it comes to safety and in a world where we are all busy and in a hurry we need to monitor what we do and not rely on enforcement. It’s up to you!

Find a TTSAO Certified School in your area

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Trucking on the 4th of July

Happy Independence Day to our American friends in the United States as you enjoy this 4th of July holiday. The United States has been celebrating independence since 1776 and this is a major holiday of the summer. For those of you that are new to the trucking industry you may not think that a holiday like the 4th of July can affect a Canadian driver delivering loads down in the United States but it can be one of the best times to travel south of the border.

Like everything in life there is good and bad in everything and trucking on 4th of July is no different. Let’s look at the good part first. When it comes to passionate patriotism you won’t find it any stronger than in the United States. Known as one of the strongest and largest countries in the World makes it a goal to live in for many people. People born in the United States are very proud to be American and display it proudly. This makes it a great place to drive because you will feel that patriotism as you drive down the road.

Truck-with-american-flag

I have always enjoyed driving on the back roads as much as possible when time allows. It gives you a different perspective into the way people live and I find it much more relaxing than always being on the big highway network. That is where you will see the pride of the country on those little back roads and small towns. Roll through Small Town, U.S.A. and you will see homes and businesses with flags out front waving proudly, you will find parades going on celebrating the day, and if lucky you will stumble onto one of those great State Fairs that are held throughout the nation. The 4th of July is a big deal and celebrated proudly with lots of celebrations and entertainment. Even for those of us not from the United States you can feel the pride of the country. When you’re parked at night don’t forget to look up as there will be many firework displays going on in most areas.

I found over my years on the road when you are in the United States the area you are in may dictate how much patriotism is shown. Everyone is patriotic but certain states seem to enhance it even more. I found states like Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio, Vermont, and New Hampshire always seem to really show their Pride as well as many of the southern states such Kentucky, Texas, and the Carolina s. Maybe it was just the areas I ran the most so I noticed it more. No matter where you travel it can be a very joyous time of year.

So what do you have to look out for when operating in the States over the fourth of July. The first thing is to check your delivery times. Many companies will be closed for the day and possibly longer due to the holiday so make sure you know when receivers will be open. Driving through an area as much as it can be fun can be a challenge. Parades will be happening in almost every town and road closures can make your trip a lengthy one. If you are trying to make miles on the 4th of July stay to the Interstate. The last safety tip is to beware of fireworks. While they are certainly beautiful to look at while in the sky they can be very dangerous when handled incorrectly. Fireworks are readily available to many and some may use them dangerously without thinking about their surroundings. The last thing you need is a truck fire because of firework debris from someone that doesn’t know what they are doing.
Be careful out there.

Driving through the Country during holidays and special times can be a great way to get a feel for a place and enjoy festivities that you may not get to see otherwise. Enjoy the benefits of being a professional driver and being able to travel and see places most people can’t, so enjoy it. Happy 4th of July!

Looking for a carrier that can offer you a career seeing the Country? Click the banner below to see a list of carriers that offer driving opportunities.

TTSAO-Carrier-Group-banner

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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