Tag Archives: #ttsao

Your resume May Be Your First Impression

Don’t expect to get hired if you’re as “Blah” as your resume! I was reading a question on a posting website where a driver said, “On paper I’m blah, I wouldn’t hire me, I’m woefully honest about things.” He went on to explain he was looking to haul regional van freight around the Midwest. He also mentioned that he had been driving for 20 years and had been through a number of bad carriers and was looking for a carrier that he felt deserved his experience. Reading this post a number of issues jumped out at me as to why this driver may not be experiencing the industry the way he should.

There are many opportunities available in trucking with different types of carriers, just go to any job fair to see them all lined up side by side. That being said carriers are also looking for he right person and not just anyone to join their team. Safety, experience, and professionalism all come into play when employers are looking for team members so that first impression is still very important when looking for work. There is one trait that many people don’t see as important but may be the most important part of your resume, your attitude.

If we go back to the opening of this article this driver wouldn’t even hire themselves to drive. That shows us a lack of enthusiasm for the job and bad self image. That attitude will creep into his work causing him to work for carriers that don’t respect him or he won’t work for carriers that pay what he is worth. Self image and attitude are a dangerous place and I am certainly not a professional in this area but his attitude is possibly keeping him back.

It sounds like he needs some help with his resume whether he is a stellar driver or not. He even admits it doesn’t look impressive and that he wouldn’t hire himself. A resume is easy to fix and assuming this driver has a safe driving history it may be a matter of arranging the resume to look a little more impressive. Many times the important part of a resume is not so much that you did some amazing feat that stands out from the crowd, but that you show longevity, safety, and growth throughout your career. If you have a resume that shows you worked for one or two companies during your career that is more impressive than someone that jumps around carrier to carrier every year from an employment standpoint.

depressed-person

The last part of the opening paragraph is his 20 years of experience and he is looking for the industry to give back to him for his experience. That attitude is entitlement and has been the killer of many careers for experienced and inexperienced drivers. Whether you’ve worked one year or twenty years the industry is not going give you a clean slate to the perfect job. You have to work for that position and that is where improving yourself over your career through education and work type are important. In business or careers there is only one way to go, up or down. If you’re not growing then you are heading the other way whether you know it or not. Set some goals and be willing to learn and try new things along the way.

This driver may be a stellar driver when it comes to operating the vehicle but his attitude and self image will keep him down for a long time. The other factor is the entitlement piece. You may feel that the industry owes you for a long career, but I can tell you from experience that there are many good people looking for work that have good solid work histories. You have to make your mark and keep yourself employable to have a sustainable career for the future. You can do it!

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Truck Drivers are the Glue to Keeping Trucking in Motion

I hear it everyday from carriers that the people coming into the industry are lacking commitment and don’t seem to have the skills necessary for the job. I see it in my classes that many students are trying to cookie cut their career and find the perfect job from day one. We see it as a whole in the industry that things are in a state of flux and organizations are trying to come up with answers that address the needs of the industry. No easy fix for sure! There is one constant component in the whole equation and that is you, the driver, the student, you’re the glue.

Why are you the glue, that important piece of a very complex puzzle? You are the piece that controls everything. As a driver you are in demand in the industry. There is a major recruiting shortage that is getting worse and drivers are needed badly. As a student you want the best job you can get, but getting that job may be harder than you expected because it is not just about driving a truck. As an industry we have been trying to find the right mix of regulations for both drivers and companies working in the industry and that has made the industry more complex over the years. How you perform as a driver glues all of those issues together. So how does this affect us going forward?

There are many that believe we don’t have a recruiting shortage but lack the necessary driver qualifications in today’s drivers. The industry has changed so much that once it was a dumping ground for people without education, it has now become one of the most regulated and education rich industries in North America. So how do you succeed in an industry that is changing at the speed of sound? The secret is to educate yourself, network, and take your position seriously.

For the most part people looking into the transportation industry have no fondness of being in classes or increasing their education. Many believe if they can drive then they have all that is needed to be successful as a professional driver. In fact the most popular reason that people get into this industry is because they went on a long trip, enjoyed the drive, and thought truck driving might be for them. What changes is when they actually get into the training aspect of the job they realize driving is only one part of the position. There are many different components to the job and driving is only 50 percent at best. Keeping yourself educated is the important aspect of being successful in today’s transportation industry. The other 50 percent of the job duties needed to be successful encompasses everything else that a driver does on a daily basis. Educate yourself regularly through videos, publications, podcasts, or other sources that you come across everyday. Find the ones that are best for you and keep up with the industry.

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Take your career to the next level and secure your position in the changing area of transportation. There is no reason why any person with a valid commercial licence should not be working for a decent carrier unless they choose not to drive. Realize that driving is only a portion of your responsibilities and the industry is changing. Don’t be one of the statistics of this industry, be part of the solution, be the glue that keeps it together.

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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You’ve Got to Give a Company a Year!

I was reading some questions lately about drivers looking for jobs and as I went through a few posts I began to notice a disturbing trend. Many of the drivers asking the questions were asking where to go to drive hauling a certain type of trailer. What was comical is that if you went down the list and read every question many were contradicting each other. The drivers may as well just switched companies. The trend I noticed was that the drivers all were fairly new drivers and many of them were looking to change companies after only 6 months of driving time. What these drivers may no realize is how much they are hurting their employment record by moving companies within a year of starting in their career. You’ve got to give a company a year as a new truck driver.

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

The first two years of your career are critical to success as a new driver and the best thing you can do for your career is learn all you can and work in a stable environment. Forget the money, forget the lanes of operation, forget everything. Drive safely and learn all you can about the job is the best way to have success in the industry.

Why stay for at least a year?

What many new drivers may not realize is that there are many factors that work together from insurance to safety to experience and if you can stay at a company for at least two years before moving to another company it helps your employment record dramatically. Once a driver has two years of experience the insurance companies look at that driver as an experienced driver and they become easier to insure. Two years is also the amount of time that it takes for a driver to learn the basic skills of the job and be self sufficient in their position. When a driver moves from company to company within the two year mark it becomes a red flag to many companies that this driver isn’t stable and it will cause them to question investing in that driver.

What looks better on an employment record? A driver that has been with a company for two years and is now looking for an improved opportunity? Or a driver that has had three jobs in the last two years and is still looking for more opportunities?

This is why it is important for new drivers to investigate companies properly when first getting started in the industry. Start your career with a reputable carrier that will offer the training and help you get the experience required to have a solid career as a driver. Don’t worry about making money, just gain as much experience as you can and stay stable at your job. After two years your options will open dramatically for the new driver and you will have enough knowledge to know what type of job you want in the industry.

find-a-ttsao-Carrier

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Transportation Risk management solutions inc joins ttsao

Please welcome Transportation Risk Management Solutions Inc. as a new associate member of the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario. Transport Risk management Solutions Inc offer safety and transport training solutions for the transportation industry.

Transportation Risk Management Solutions Inc.
Contact: Jeff Lehmann
Email: jeff.lehmann@transportationrisk.ca
Address:  292 North St., Elora ON N0B 1S0
Phone: 905-898-9167
Website: www.transportationrisk.ca

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Should you switch carriers for the money?

The fight for drivers is becoming intense as wages go up to attract talent. With salaries over $80,000 being promised by some carriers drivers are starting to perk up and look for work else where even though they may have been happy at their existing carrier.

I was reading a question the other day in an article where a spouse was looking for suggestions from other drivers as to whether her husband should move from one carrier to another as he was the sole income earner for the family. He was working for a good carrier, home every night, had seniority, Union support, benefits, etc. I won’t say the name but it is a well respected carrier in the industry.

As a single family income he of course is looking to make as much money as possible and feels he has reached his income potential with his current carrier. He is seeing the big offers by other carriers, applied for the job, and received an offer. His dilemma now, does he take the job? The new carrier is offering an over the road job and requires him to be away 5-6 days per week. The family is okay with that but will he really make more money?

speeding-truck

This is an important question that people don’t always think through because the salary potential gets in the way. We see the dollar signs and that can cloud our judgement causing us to make the wrong decision. Let’s break it down a bit more.

First the salary you see in an advertisement is often an average or above average salary of what is possible for a driver. If all the stars align you could make “X” number of dollars. It is against the law to put out false advertising so you could make that income if everything is right. The world of transportation doesn’t work that way however and each driver has their own work pace. Some drivers are slower, some have more experience, some have better travel lanes, some have certain equipment, so there are many variables when it comes to how much income a person can make even in the same fleet.

Delays are the next variable that can really hurt the income stated by a carrier. If you get delayed for long periods of time that can affect your earnings. Expenses on the road can take a large chunk of income from a driver. Like the driver above he was home every night, slept in his own bed, showered at home, and possibly took his lunch to work each day. If he takes the job over the road he may now have to pay for showers, buy meals on the road, and buy personal items and equipment for his truck. These are all expenses that many times comes out of the drivers own pocket and income.

If you leave one carrier to drive for another carrier that may give you a raise of $10,000 but if you have to put out more money for expenses you really aren’t ahead of the game. You’re just taking that money and giving it to the truck stop or other vendor. Do your homework if looking at new opportunities as they may not always be what they seem. It’s what you want for a career that’s important, not just the money!

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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you’ll get the best fuel efficiency by operating in your engine’s “sweet spot”

Fuel-Efficient Driver Training
The SmartDriver for Highway Trucking (SDHT) training program presents fuel‑efficient
driving strategies for drivers of tractor-trailers operating in an environment of
rising fuel prices and growing demands for environmental responsibility. SDHT
offers a flexible suite of online, in-classroom, and on-road training materials that
can be used individually or as part of a blended learning program.

SDHT 06-FactSheet #3_2018-01-10
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Fuel-Efficient Driver Training

The SmartDriver for Highway Trucking (SDHT) training program helps heavy‑duty
truck drivers improve their fuel efficiency by up to 35%. In addition to protecting
personal income and industry competitiveness, SDHT benefits include reduced
greenhouse gas emissions, less vehicle wear and tear, and increased safety.

SDHT 04-FactSheet #1_2018-01-10
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CHET gives a presentation to the Peel Goods Movement Task Force

Hard on the heels of the Conference, I  was involved in giving a presentation to the Peel Goods Movement Task Force last Friday, and I now know that we, as a group (TTSAO) through CHET are accepted as a stakeholder in relation to Training.    A big plus for the Association to be among such an elite level of planners, logicians and academics in transportation. To view the information check out the link below.

https://www.peelregion.ca/pw/transportation/goodsmovement/pdf/goods-movement-strategic-plan-2017-2021.pdf

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TTSAO Welcomes 2019-2021 Board of Directors

TTSAO would like to introduce to you our newly appointed board of directors for 2019-2021. 

We look forward to working together over the next 3 years.  Thank you for your commitment to the TTSAO.

Please give a warm welcome and thanks to the following persons:

Board of Directors

Ken Adams, Chairman of the Board-Crossroads, Ottawa

Philip Fletcher Vice- Chairman, Commercial Heavy Equipment Training

Yvette Lagrois, Past Chairperson-Ontario Truck Training Academy

Sean Essner, Modern Training Ontario

Jack Lochand, Alpine Truck Driver Training

Brian Pattison, Northern Academy of Transportation Training

Kelly Perez, Zavcor Training Academy

Lesley de Repentigny, KnowledgeSurge Institute Trucking School

Ray St. Jean, Northstar Truck Driving School

Charlie Charalambous, Director of Communication and Public Relations

Mike Millian, Private Motor Truck Council of Canada

Lisa Arseneau, Chairperson, TTSAO Insurance Group

Guy Broderick, Chairman, TTSAO Carrier Group

Contracted Associates

Clarissa Maristela, Sara Fitchett Quest Consulting

Kim Richardson, President-TTSAO-TransRep Inc.

TTSAO-logo-2018
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