Tag Archives: Youth

Reading between the lines of an interview

Interviews can be tough! You work hard to get prepared for the interview, work on your answers with friends and family, and pray before the interview that everything is in order. You get through the interview sweating the whole way with no direction or indicators as to whether you did well or not. Did you get the job? If you didn’t get the job what did you do wrong so you know to improve in that area for next time? If you did do well why did they not ask you to move to the next step? All these factors can play on your mind as a potential applicant for a job and many times the only indication of success is being asked for another interview. So how do you handle the interview process without driving yourself crazy?

This is a typical scenario for many new applicants and I recently came across this question on a social media platform where the person asked if they did poorly in the interview process because they hadn’t been asked for another interview before the current interview ended. Just because you haven’t been asked back for an interview doesn’t mean it wasn’t successful as there are many steps and pieces to hiring someone.

man talking on telephone

When I was in charge of a fleet our interview process was quite involved and included many departments. As a Fleet Supervisor I was the first step in the process. I would accept the applications and check to see that the applicant met the basic criteria for the job. Did they have the required experience and training, did they have a good driving record and so on. Once their resume met our criteria and I felt the candidate would be a good fit for a position available they would be called in for an initial interview and road test with me. If the interview was successful they would be scheduled for a panel interview with other members of the management team. The management team would then have an additional meeting to discuss the applicant to make sure they were a proper fit for the company.

Depending on the size of the company and the operation this process can take anywhere from days to months. Our operation was very involved and it was much more than hoping someone could drive well. They had to have customer service skills, knowledge of hauling hazardous materials, be physically fit, and much more. So if you are going through the interview process don’t be discouraged because the interviewer didn’t book you for another interview right away. It doesn’t mean you weren’t successful there just may be other factors required in the process before they could book that meeting or interview. Just ask when an appropriate time will be to hear back from them or for you to follow up and have confidence in your abilities. Understanding the interview process is the first step to being hired on as a professional driver.

Check out these carriers that are hiring new drivers.

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Give the Gift of a Career for Christmas

Merry Christmas to all of you in the transportation industry and Happy Boxing Day to those that celebrate as well. We’ve come to Christmas-Wreaththe end of 2018 and we all can take some time to relax and reflect as we get ready for 2019. As we were exchanging gifts over the Holiday Season it struck me that for some the perfect gift may have been the start on a new career.

I know many of you feel the way I do about the trucking industry in the fact that it has given us so much in the way of experience, opportunities, and friendships. So if the industry has given us so much over a lifetime what a great gift to give to somebody. Now I haven’t fleshed everything out as to how this would work but it may be the answer to a variety of issues. It may make a great gift, it may give people an insight into the industry, and it may help with the recruiting shortage. You’re probably thinking at this point how you would give someone a career?

Here is how I see it working. The trucking industry is intriguing to many people. I talk with people all the time and they say, “ I have always thought about driving those big trucks.” What if we were able to show them? Maybe the schools or carriers can put together gift cards for people that you can buy a person a gift card for a ride in a truck? This way people can go for a ride and get a feel for the trucks and see if that is something they would like to do. Maybe there can be a way of buying someone a course for their licence upgrade or even a full course. Now I know that you can just pay for someone’s course but people won’t do that without a serious commitment. If we can give people a window to peek into our world maybe they may see some of the things that many of us already have seen and experienced.

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If you could give someone the gift of a course and they were to take it seriously think of the gift you have given them. You have given them a lifetime of income, a world of opportunities for the future, and friendships that will last forever, tell me what better gift is that? Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you and may 2019 be a successful year for everyone.

TTSAO 2019

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO Training Already Ahead of National Training Standards

TTSAO certified training is already ahead of the standards called for across the Country and you may be asking yourself why you should care? Training is training isn’t it? The fact is that higher training may be setting you up to be a leader in the industry in the near future.

The trucking industry made the news again this week, this time out West in Saskatchewan. Training standards were the main topic of conversation in the light of another truck crash. Ontario and a couple other Provinces are the only areas requiring Mandatory Entry Level Training ( M.E.L.T.) for truck drivers and the call is for a national standard across the Country. Ontario implemented the program in 2017 calling for a minimum of 103.5 hours of training to be completed before proceeding to the licence test. Provinces are calling for all Provinces to adopt mandatory training so that there is a standard in the industry. Even those same drivers that have normally fought against increased regulations are now calling for it due to recent incidents.

Here is the source story from CTV News that came out this week on the issue. https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/professor-interviews-truckers-across-canada-calls-for-standard-truck-driving-training-nation-wide-1.4214217

In a recent meeting with training schools, the Ministry of Ontario, and insurance providers for the industry everyone agrees on one thing, there is a problem in the industry. We have a driver shortage of qualified candidates, insurance providers are struggling with increased incident rates, and the courtesy and driver professionalism of the past is slipping away with each generation. Big issues to deal with and little options available. To date the answer has been to add more regulations onto the industry using technology but in my opinion that seems to be hampering progress instead of helping it.

TTSAO December 11th MeetingThe Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario (TTSAO) have always provided training with programs over 200 hours in length and featuring all aspects of the job from Hours of Service to driving techniques. The course minimum has been in place for years before M.E.L.T. came along. You may be asking why this should matter to you?

The industry as a whole are now starting to look at driver finishing programs and extended training curriculums to help produce a better driver. Once some data has been received from the pilot M.E.L.T. programs in place I am sure that a national program will be implemented nationwide. One thing for sure is that the Government has to protect everyone’s rights across the Country and with that you can be sure that minimum standards will be implemented over maximum standards. That being said if you want to improve your chances to be at the forefront of a career in transportation and want to be hired by the top carriers in the Country then proper training and operating as a professional driver will be required. Once a national program is introduced then those with more than the minimum will be at the forefront and TTSAO schools offer that maximum advantage. You can find a TTSAO school in your area at www.ttsao.com

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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TTSAO Meeting Focuses on Instructor Qualifications

Driving instructors seemed to be the focus of the meeting at yesterdays Truck Training School Association of Ontario (TTSAO) Meeting on December 11th which held a number of panels from insurance professionals to large carriers and had a full house of attendees. As I watched the moderators ask questions of the panel one common thread was instructor qualifications. Even the Ministry of Transportation is looking into instructors in the light of their M.E.L.T program implemented in 2017.

TTSAO December 11th Meeting

Board Member Gerald Carroll started things off with information on the TTSAO Conference coming up on February 27th and 28th 2019. An outline of the agenda and sponsorship opportunities were explained and Charlie Charalambous talked about the new instructor award being presented and sponsored by PayBright. You can register for the conference and learn more about the Instructor Award on the TTSAO website at www.ttsao.comTTSAO 2019Maybe this kicked it off in my mind that the focus was on instructor qualifications but each panel seemed to have that common thread. The first update by the Ministry of Transportation offered a look at the Mandatory Entry Level Program ( M.E.L.T.) for drivers and are expanding the program for “D” licensed drivers. It was mentioned that the next step for the M.E.L.T program would be instructor certification and qualifications. Currently the Ministry is collecting data over a 3-5 year period as to how well the program is working.TTSAO December 11th MeetingLisa Arseneau moderated the discussion for the Carrier Panel which included carriers Challenger, Kriska, and Rosedale offering tips on where drivers need help when applying for jobs with many carriers. Backing up and more complete training was commented as an issue for new applicants. All the carriers mentioned they were happy to have a M.E.L.T. as a base for looking at new applicants, and the carriers mentioned that positive promotion of the industry is required to bring in new people to the industry. Instructor certification and recognized teaching strategies were all good steps to improvement in training from a carrier standpoint.TTSAO December 11th MeetingA discussion with the Insurance Group was moderated by Guy Broderick and the key point of this panel was instructor qualifications again. The insurance industry is trying to change some of the ways they insure carriers to help bring in more people to the industry. What they are seeing through their data is that many of the severe crashes are from inexperienced drivers and they feel instructor certification would be a big step to helping insure new people in the industry.

The meeting was closed off with an update from the MTCU ( Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities) on the training amounts allotted for schools to train new students. Chairperson Kim Richardson closed the meeting with remarks to the full house.TTSAO December 11th MeetingOverall the training industry is working very hard to bring the status of the driver in the transportation industry to professional levels. TTSAO is at the forefront of many of the talks with Ministry officials and is moving the mark forward, but as mentioned by Geoff Topping of Challenger Motor Freight, “We all need to do our part to promote the professionalism of the industry.”

Improving the outlook of the industry will go along way to helping all of us for the long term and hopefully will solve the recruiting issues in the industry. If you are currently an instructor in the industry look for certification training in the near future. It’s being talked about by all groups in the industry. Register for the TTSAO Conference in February by clicking here.TTSAO 2019About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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PMTC’s Young Leaders to hold General meeting December 18th and raise money for food bank

The Young Leaders Group (YLG) of the Private Motor Truck Council of Canada (PMTC) is hosting their annual Christmas breakfast and general meeting.

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The meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 in Cambridge, ON at Sharp Transportation Systems’ offices located at 1225 Balmoral Rd. Registration will be from 8:00am until 8:30am. The meeting will begin at 8:30am with the general meeting followed by a career story with guest speaker Shari Lagala, Health and Safety Training Manager at Patene Building Supplies. The meeting will wrap up at 10:30.

Both PMTC members and non-members are welcome. If you are 40 and under, not currently a member of the PMTC and are interested in the PMTC Young Leaders Group, please feel free to register to attend and learn about this great group! The cost to register is a donation to the food bank. The YLG will be accepting monetary and/or food donations which will go to the Cambridge Self Help Food Bank.

Matt Richardson, PMTC YLG Chairperson, had this to say about the upcoming event: “The PMTC YLG is happy to be completing our 3rd annual Christmas meeting and educational session. The turn out the past couple of years has been great and we are hoping the same for this year. As in previous years, the event will feature a charity component with donations (food and monetary) being accepted for the Cambridge Self Help Food Bank. This is an excellent opportunity for PMTC and PMTC YLG members to support the Cambridge Food Bank heading in to the holiday season, along with getting together for a networking and learning opportunity”.

To register, e-mail info@pmtc.ca, or call 905-827-0587.  Space is limited so don’t delay!

This seminar is being offered as part of the YLG’s mission to bring value to the next generation through education, discussions and networking. We’d love to see you there. Get out! Get involved! Get inspired!

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Trucking Offers Flexible Options for a Career

It’s been a sad week of news so far this week with many manufacturing plants announcing closings and changes to their workforce. It is always sad to see people losing their jobs and having to look to either retraining, moving, or searching for new work. General Motors announced the closing of several plants across North America this week and Maple Leaf Foods announced the moving their plant from Toronto to London Ontario. Good for some people bad for others. Those good jobs in manufacturing have been on the decline for decades since our economy began to buy on global scale and that’s what makes trucking such a lucrative and viable option.

Careers these days are not about working at a plant because your family before you worked there. Those were the old ways of thinking where you got a good job and then worked at a company for thirty years. In today’s world working at a company for five years is a major career and the secret to longevity is to keep retraining yourself and improving your knowledge of technology. Those not willing to learn and upgrade will find themselves left behind in a drastically changing world. There was a company that announced up to 800 new positions in the region at the same time of the other closings, all the jobs announced were in technology. Start upgrading!

Technology

We may be surprised today but this has been happening for years. I personally went back to school many years ago to learn some new skills when I wanted to move up in the company I was working with. At that time four drivers in our fleet were in a race for promotion to become supervisor of the fleet, myself included. All had years of experience, good work record, and respect from the team. This was a time however when everything was becoming more computerized and items like expense reports and dispatch services were transferring from paper to computers. As I had returned to school and was upgrading my computer skills where the other candidates had not and that got me the position. This is one of the reasons I am big on self education to this day as it will offer you so many opportunities for the future.

Let’s get back to trucking and the benefits of flexibility. I think the transportation industry may be one of the only industries that can offer you that life-long career due to the many options available. If we take the news of plants closing and jobs going to Mexico that is a terrible thing for workers here, no doubt. For trucking however that will offer many news lanes and an increase in jobs for individuals. If you pursue a job in trucking there are many opportunities in the seat but there will also be other positions required in safety, dispatch, administration, and other services specific to transportation.

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Making high wages in the manufacturing sector won’t be sustainable for the future even if we want it to be. Labour costs are generally the highest expenses a company can have and will always be looking at that expense when trying to survive in a global economy. Transportation offers flexibility with change and even if products are made outside the Country they will need to be transported into locations for the future.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Career Training Over Job Training

Am I suggesting that you don’t get job training? Of course not everyone needs some type of training on the job and that is normal and expected. What I am suggesting is if you are new to the industry or career that you are looking for that you consider career training as opposed to one specific type of job training. Let me share an example with you.

Bob is looking for a new job as he recently lost his job from a previous employer. He is 45 years old with a wife and two kids and needs something more stable. The industry he was in before has become unstable and he wants something that will offer him steady work. Bob is currently looking at two opportunities both in the transportation industry because he has heard there is steady work. One opportunity is with a company handling administration work in load planning and the other is over the road as a professional truck driver. Bob is eligible for funding assistance for the new career if he takes the driver training, but he is not sure he wants to go out on the road. The real question is which opportunity should he take?

As someone who has been in the industry for many years I often come across people trying to decide on job opportunities similar to this. They have an immediate opportunity for one position but are able to get subsidized training for another option that may take longer to complete but offer more options for the future.

Every decision here will be a personal decision for the person deciding. Personal issues, income availability, and work ambitions all come into play in the decision. If we were to use Bob’s scenario above and assuming Bob had the income to keep him a float for approximately eight weeks. Then the driving position would be the direction I would suggest he go, here is why.

Driver-in-truck

If he takes the first option of the load planning position he would learn about that particular job and it may move him up the career ladder through that carrier or another company with similar positions. Here is the problems I see with this position. You will only be understanding the job from your job focus for the most part. Your career future may be limited due to positions available in the future if something happens to your job. Depending on where your future takes you it may not have the respect of the team below you if you haven’t got a true understanding of the road. Now I am certainly not saying that someone who hasn’t driven before can’t have a solid career in trucking, it just takes more homework.

If Bob takes the option of going through a truck training course he will have more options available for the future. He may not want to drive forever but driving positions are the most positions available now and in the future if someone is looking for steady work. Having a commercial driver’s licence allows for a variety a variety of opportunities from local work to highway operations allowing for more variety on the job depending on the carrier. There are more options for finding the type of work of preference and the income potential is high right from the start. In the training course Bob will learn all aspects of the transportation industry and that will offer a good base of understanding and respect from others in the industry should Bob move off the road at a later date.

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Looking at your career options farther than your current opportunities can be tough at first but if you think about the big picture you will see that many times the longer the opportunity for access the more opportunities it will produce down the road. Of course that’s just my opinion.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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The Benefits of Hiring a Driver with Military Background

Talk to any recruiter about the importance of finding the right candidate for their team and you will get a whole list of reasons why this is important. Company culture, technical aspects of the job, and independent decision making are all aspects that many team members need to be successful at their jobs. Finding the candidate with all of those qualities requires recruiting personnel to either have a crystal ball or be able to read minds. I know a lot of good recruiters but none with crystal balls or that read minds. There is however ways to help you choose the right team members using past history or experience.

Usually when recruiting personnel are looking into past experience or history of an applicant they are looking for the basics such as training for the job, negatives in performance, and any risky behaviour. How many are looking deeper? How many are looking for that past experience that may be beneficial for the job?

Being a professional truck driver requires a person that can take on knowledge in many different areas, have quick decision making capabilities, and has an eye for safety. Add the mechanical aspect of the job and the day to day issues that all drivers face and you need to find not only a capable person but a superhero. People who have been in the military may just offer that type of experience.

Military-Trucks

In the past I have had those types of people in my classes. I had a driver that was just beginning his career in trucking. He had been in the military but hadn’t driven vehicles as large as a tractor trailer. He went through the training with flying colours because he was used to following instructions. When he was introduced to the dangerous goods part of the course he was a master. It turns out he had been a dangerous goods instructor in the army. In fact his first carrier hired him to help existing employees with their dangerous goods training.

This is a benefit that may not have been discussed prior depending on the recruiting styles and process of the carrier. There are other reasons to look for someone with military experience for your team. Military personnel much like truck drivers are trained in many aspects outside of their normal role in areas such as time management, note taking, dangerous goods, communications, and other items that make driving a successful career. With the security issues we now have on a daily basis who else could be more beneficial to a team than someone experienced in looking for bad people. Many have experience with mechanical items as in basic training you are expected to take a rifle apart and put it back together. Military personnel are used to conducting inspections on equipment and looking for delays or problem-solving.

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If you are looking for new members for your team then you may want to find someone with military training. It may be the closest thing you have to crystal ball. Speaking of veterans I would like to take a moment to thank those serving in the Military past or present with warm felt thank you for your bravery and courage.

Remember all of our Veterans this November 11th.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Searching for a Job Halloween Style

Trick or Treat-Halloween Carriers

“Trick or Treat” is a saying many people know since childhood. You walk house to house every October 31st holding out your bag almost singing the words wondering what type of candy you will get in your bag, will it be a trick or a treat? You keep collecting candy until your bag is full and then you take it home and review all the contents usually by dumping the whole bag on the floor. The sorting Halloween costumesbegins with what you consider a trick for bad candy to the treats which are your favourites. Then the review officer takes over, usually Mom and goes through the bag to make sure nothing dangerous has been included and gives you the candy you are allowed to eat. This is a process that every kid in North America goes through on Halloween each year.

If something like Halloween can be repeated so that almost every household has the same procedure with candy and is able to weed out the bad and good candy based on taste wouldn’t it be beneficial to take that same procedure and adapt it to your job search. After all it is basically the same thing, you are applying to jobs that you really don’t know if they will be a trick or a treat of a job until you start working there. Your job search would look like this.

Step 1-Your Neighbourhood

Basic criteria for the job search such as location, career goals, interests, equipment, and pay package. This is the same as mapping out the route for your neighbourhood.

Step 2-Trick or Treating

Gather 10 job opportunities that fit the criteria you set out above and put them into a bag or folder if working electronically. Don’t look at any job opportunity details until you have collected all 10 opportunities so that you don’t get caught up in the details of just one. This is the same as trick or treating.

Step 3-Sorting

With a notepad create a summary list and start going through the opportunities collected. Toss any that don’t meet your criteria and put the ones that do on your notepad. You may want to create columns as the goal of the sort is to get a bird’s eye view of the opportunities. Once you have your list sorted and complete you are ready for the next step. This is the same as dumping all of your candy on the floor.

candy

Step 4-Review Officer

Contact and apply to the top 3 best job opportunities on the list. Once those three are exhausted if you still haven’t been hired go to the next three opportunities and so on until you get the best job on your list. This is the same as Mom reviewing the candy to make sure there are no suspicious elements.

If you think about it you have been doing the same system since you were a child. You are just applying it to different types of candy. In this electronic age of course you don’t have to physically go knocking on doors but the idea is the same as going out for Halloween. Get your best business costume on and get out there!

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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CBC’s Marketplace Test Truck Safety and Training in the Industry

CBC Marketplace did a test on truck training to see how easy it was for someone to get a commercial licence and how much training was involved. We are including the story here to show you the importance of seeking out certified training sources when beginning a new career.

Read and view the story
on CBC Marketplace here.

 

Find a TTSAO Certified School in your area

 

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