Tag Archives: Youth

The Trucking Community is Continually Giving Back

Giving back to a cause or group can be a very rewarding thing that a person or company can do. I’m a firm believer in, “what goes around comes around” type of thinking and believe that our lives are intertwined to help each other in some sort of strange way. Many causes are asking for donations or raising funds for research and you would think that donating a certain amount of money to a cause would solve the issue. The problem with just writing a cheque is that you miss the passion and the real gift of giving back. Experiencing the joy you put back into the hearts of others can be more rewarding than any cheque you could write.

What always amazes me is how much the transportation industry steps up to the challenge when it comes to helping others. We all know that truck drivers are very busy, under time regulations, and only get paid when the wheels are turning, yet truck drivers and the transportation industry come out in droves every time to give back to great causes. When I interviewed many of the drivers and people at the events they all said one thing, the smiles on their faces kept bringing them back again and again. It wasn’t the money, it wasn’t the time, but the smiles. Touching other people’s hearts can be a wonderful thing.

Think about this, truck drivers work around 70 hours per week, get limited time off with their families, yet managed to take time to help three convoys on the weekend raise almost $200,000 for important causes and that’s just in Ontario. 50 trucks showed up to the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics GTA convoy and raised over $50,000 dollars along with sponsorships and donations. The Truck Convoy for Special Olympics in Paris Ontario with 70 trucks, sponsorships, and donations raised over $75,000. And Trucking for a Cure had their Eastern convoy had 50 trucks and raised almost $70,000. All those convoys were on the same day in different parts of the Province for different causes, but it was the trucking community making a difference.

Kim Richardson of the TTSAO

Many associations like the Truck Training School Association of Ontario and the Fleet Safety Council support these causes in various ways through their members or associations as a whole and often send funds for a certain level, but it is always nice to see members attend and participate in the event showing their support. Even more impressive in other ways is when the owners of companies get involved with these causes and take their time to show support for their members involved and the cause such as Challenger President Dan Einwetcher who participated as a driver in the Paris convoy.

If you have never been involved in a cause as a participant or spectator then I would urge you to get involved. Many reputable carriers urge their employees to get involved as a way of showing support and giving back to the industry. Get involved!

Check out some of those great carriers here!

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Use your training time to get job ready as a new driver

As I was surfing some industry blogs the other day and I came across an article that got me thinking about new drivers and preparing themselves for a new career as a professional driver. The article was a comment style article where a person new to the industry was asking which carrier they should sign on with to get their training.

The new driver had the option of getting his licence on his own or signing on with a carrier and have them train the person through their own training program. His dilemma was which carrier to choose. He posted the comment on the website asking for feedback on different carriers and got a whole lot of information. He was looking at some of the big carriers in the United States trying to evaluate the best ones to work for. In one of his last comments he had talked to a carrier and liked what they had to offer. One of his main reasons for choosing that carrier is that he would be close to home for his training allowing him to be home to sleep in his own bed and eat meals at home.

Driver-in-truck

This is a common way that many people new to the industry decide on choosing a school. They look for a school close to their home so they don’t have to drive too far for their training. I have seen this first hand in training programs as an instructor where students want to leave early from class or are in a hurry to get home to finish chores around the house, but could that be hurting their success?

One of the issues we find in the industry is that people are not prepared for the life style change that comes with a job in the transportation as a driver. The training schools tell the students about it, the recruiters remind them about it at the time of hiring, but then the student gets a job and finds it very hard to adjust to being away from home. Part of the problem may be in the mindset of the student. Trucking is not a nine to five position even in the city as a local driver. Students need to prepare their minds for the change of lifestyle that will occur once they start driving for a company. This means adjusting to the job at the beginning by practicing what you will have to do in reality. Of course you want to keep expenses down until you have money coming in but adjusting your schedule so that it begins to feel like it will when you get hired can go along way to success in the industry.

How do you mimic a lifestyle that you don’t know how will work for the future? The biggest adjustment for most students is the time away from home. Let me tell you from experience as much as it is a big adjustment for you, it is an even bigger adjustment for your family. Depending on how you have set up your training schedule changing it up can be the best thing you can do. Try not to set it up to be nine to five everyday. Spend additional hours practicing what you’ve learned. If you can pick a school that is not in your area so that you can get used to staying out over a few days at a time even better. Adjust your time to waking up early or staying up late, practice taking lunches and snacks like you would on the road. Basically you are getting used to your new life. Once you work for a carrier you won’t be going home at noon after a four hour yard shift or have multiple days off in between runs, so get used to the new lifestyle. The faster you and your family adjust to the new industry, the faster and more successful you will be once you start your new career.

TTSAO-School-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Do Your Homework When Searching for a Carrier

I have been in this industry for a long time and I am always amazed at some of the issues I hear going on within the industry like the issue many drivers face called “Bus and Dump.” I was looking through some articles on the industry when I came across this article from Fleet Owner Publication on “Bus and Dump” which is a practice some carriers use in the United States to recruit drivers to their team. I have never heard of the practice in Canada, but apparently this is a practice that has been going on for some time in the U.S. So what is “Bus and Dump?”

 

“Bus and Dump” is the practice of hiring drivers through an online application form on a website with a promise to hire, offering them travel arrangements to attend orientation, and then once they arrive making an excuse to turn them away.

You’re the driver and you want to get a new job in the transportation industry. You fill out an online application and get a message or phone call from the recruiter telling you that you have been accepted for the position. The carrier sends you a bus ticket to arrive in orientation at an arranged date and time and you accept. You head out to the location that is often across the Country and are excited to start with a new company. When you arrive the carrier tells you for some reason that you are no longer required and sets you on your way. You now have to find your own way home with no money or accommodations. You can read the actual article by clicking this website link. https://www.fleetowner.com/driver-management/bus-and-dump-drivers-expose-industrys-dirty-practice

depressed-person

How do you protect yourself against the “Bus and Dump” practice?

The first step is to do your homework on the carrier and make sure they are legitimate. There are plenty of jobs available in the industry for the right candidates so there is no reason to go to carriers that are participating in unethical practices. Know who you are applying to and make sure they are a reputable company. You can do this by following the same format of investigation the carrier uses to hire you.

Investigating a Carrier

  • Only apply to carriers through reputable job websites or carrier specific websites
  • Make sure you understand if you are going for a first time interview or have actually been hired.
  • Research the carrier profile and safety record by adding their name to searches on websites like www.fmcsa.dot.gov or Google and review the information about them.
  • Talk to three references about them from drivers or other people in the industry
  • Have a discussion via phone or video with the person hiring you and find out any pertinent information required, such as dress for the job, equipment required, etc.
  • If traveling far from home have a letter of intent to hire from the carrier in writing. This may come in handy should you have to take legal action at a later date.
  • Be honest about any convictions or other information that may cause issues in the hiring process.
  • Have a your own original copies of all documents such as abstracts, licence, and so on should they be altered by someone else in the process
  • Take enough money for accommodations and travel back home if required.
  • Keep in contact with family or friends about your whereabouts and progress.

You can’t stop a carrier from unscrupulous methods of hiring drivers but you don’t have to participate in the practice. This is why many industry professionals caution new students on accepting the first job that comes along. Do your homework, I can’t say that enough! Reputable carriers don’t participate in such practices as “Bus and Dump” and you shouldn’t either.

TTSAO-carrierl-banner-2018

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Should you work for a small carrier or a large carrier?

What is the best experienced company when looking for a carrier?

That was the question a young driver was asking that has just started his career. I came across this question on a social media site and thought it was interesting so I kept reading some of the answers. Some were silly, some humorous, and some had good information. The intrigue wasn’t so much with the answers, but the intent of the question itself. The driver who left the question explained that he was working for a large carrier in the United States for now but once he got his six months to a year of experience he wanted to find a small carrier to call home. His exact comment was, “Obviously we don’t want to drive for the megas forever, so what are good smaller companies?” This driver is looking at his driving career in the wrong way in my opinion and will always have trouble finding a good fit because the size of a carrier doesn’t mean anything.

There are carriers that are very large and great carriers that are very small and everything in between. The real questions you have to ask and only you can answer it is what do you want to do? Where do you want to go? What type of work do you want to do? How far do you want to travel? I have worked for various carriers over my career and found all of them had good and bad qualities.

Small carriers are great. You will often find a family feel and great equipment. When there’s a problem you can go right to the top and voice your concerns. Many times your dedication and hard work will be noticed by the top faster and that can lead to better runs and good money. The downside of a small carrier is that there can be little opportunity for growth outside of the driving position. If it is a family owned company there may be little opportunities available outside of the seat and it can lead to feeling stuck and unhappy down the road.

Man-with-blue-truck

Large Carriers are great as well. At large carriers there can be a wide array of support services for drivers from maintenance to administration that can help make your life a whole lot easier for day to day operations. Get stuck at the border and there is someone to call, need help with a maintenance issue and they can swap out equipment or have the resources to help you. The biggest positive I have found with large carriers is that there is room to grow in your career. If you want to expand out of the seat you can apply for positions inside of the office and create career longevity without changing carriers. The downside of many large carriers is the politics. This can happen in small carriers as well, but is often found in large carriers just due to the size of the operation.

Small and large sized carriers both have positive and negative points to their operations. I have seen drivers that have loved working with a large carrier in the fact that there is more flexibility for work options and time off. Some people don’t mind working long hours but want that family feel of an operation. There is no wrong or right answer what you are looking for will dictate the type of operation you apply to and only you know what that is.

TTSAO-Carrier-Group-banner

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Don’t End Your Career Before It Begins

As I read an article the other day on the Humboldt tragedy I was very sad. I was sad for a community that lost so many good people, I was sad for the driver that has not only lost his career but much of his future once he is sentenced, and I am sad for the transportation industry that I know with so many good hard working people in it that have been scarred again by a situation causing such grief.

We still haven’t heard the details of the horrible crash that killed 16 members of the Humboldt Broncos hockey team, but after an extensive investigation the driver was charged with 29 charges ranging from dangerous driving causing death to dangerous driving causing bodily injury. If convicted of all charges this young driver will be in jail for many years. You can read the article at Truck News at https://www.trucknews.com/health-safety/twenty-nine-charges-laid-on-truck-driver-involved-in-humboldt-broncos-bus-collision/1003086645/

It is very sad to see a good community lose so many of their members and I am sad for the driver who’s life has changed for the future. All we have now are lessons to be learned from this tragedy so that it doesn’t happen again. We haven’t heard all the details but whatever the reason for the crash I am sure the driver didn’t mean to have this happen. Incidents like this can change a driver forever, it’s much like war vets with Post Traumatic Syndrome Disorder where this driver will live with this tragedy his whole life.

 

When I was a young driver another driver that worked for one of our customers had his young son along with him for the summer and while the boy was opening the doors of the trailer he got caught between the truck and the dock and was killed. That driver never drove again.

A couple years ago a driver that had a stellar 40 year career was driving down the 401 when someone on the side of the road acting as though they were fixing a car stepped into the path of the passing truck killing themselves. The driver had no chance of prevention and was devastated ending his driving career.

In all of these incidents the drivers lived, but also died with the victims. There careers over no matter how experienced and their lives changed for the future. The memories will always be there of that night and although those affected may be able to get help to cope they will never truly be the same.

depressed-person

How do we combat these tragedies? In some cases we can’t do it alone as some factors are out of our hands, but as a new or experienced driver what you can do is to keep learning, keep alert, and pay attention to the task at hand. Shut off the distractions in the cab, focus on the road, and do proper trip planning keeping communications open. Don’t end what can be a great career because of inattention or trying to make a quick buck by pushing a mile. The decisions you make may last for a lifetime. Our thoughts and prayers are with those affected by this tragedy.

Find a TTSAO Certified School in your area

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Trucking on the 4th of July

Happy Independence Day to our American friends in the United States as you enjoy this 4th of July holiday. The United States has been celebrating independence since 1776 and this is a major holiday of the summer. For those of you that are new to the trucking industry you may not think that a holiday like the 4th of July can affect a Canadian driver delivering loads down in the United States but it can be one of the best times to travel south of the border.

Like everything in life there is good and bad in everything and trucking on 4th of July is no different. Let’s look at the good part first. When it comes to passionate patriotism you won’t find it any stronger than in the United States. Known as one of the strongest and largest countries in the World makes it a goal to live in for many people. People born in the United States are very proud to be American and display it proudly. This makes it a great place to drive because you will feel that patriotism as you drive down the road.

Truck-with-american-flag

I have always enjoyed driving on the back roads as much as possible when time allows. It gives you a different perspective into the way people live and I find it much more relaxing than always being on the big highway network. That is where you will see the pride of the country on those little back roads and small towns. Roll through Small Town, U.S.A. and you will see homes and businesses with flags out front waving proudly, you will find parades going on celebrating the day, and if lucky you will stumble onto one of those great State Fairs that are held throughout the nation. The 4th of July is a big deal and celebrated proudly with lots of celebrations and entertainment. Even for those of us not from the United States you can feel the pride of the country. When you’re parked at night don’t forget to look up as there will be many firework displays going on in most areas.

I found over my years on the road when you are in the United States the area you are in may dictate how much patriotism is shown. Everyone is patriotic but certain states seem to enhance it even more. I found states like Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio, Vermont, and New Hampshire always seem to really show their Pride as well as many of the southern states such Kentucky, Texas, and the Carolina s. Maybe it was just the areas I ran the most so I noticed it more. No matter where you travel it can be a very joyous time of year.

So what do you have to look out for when operating in the States over the fourth of July. The first thing is to check your delivery times. Many companies will be closed for the day and possibly longer due to the holiday so make sure you know when receivers will be open. Driving through an area as much as it can be fun can be a challenge. Parades will be happening in almost every town and road closures can make your trip a lengthy one. If you are trying to make miles on the 4th of July stay to the Interstate. The last safety tip is to beware of fireworks. While they are certainly beautiful to look at while in the sky they can be very dangerous when handled incorrectly. Fireworks are readily available to many and some may use them dangerously without thinking about their surroundings. The last thing you need is a truck fire because of firework debris from someone that doesn’t know what they are doing.
Be careful out there.

Driving through the Country during holidays and special times can be a great way to get a feel for a place and enjoy festivities that you may not get to see otherwise. Enjoy the benefits of being a professional driver and being able to travel and see places most people can’t, so enjoy it. Happy 4th of July!

Looking for a carrier that can offer you a career seeing the Country? Click the banner below to see a list of carriers that offer driving opportunities.

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Canadian Carriers Driving for New Hires

Want a pay raise? Sign on with one of the many Canadian Carriers that are increasing pay packages and benefits for drivers. If you are new to the industry you may not have known about the perfect storm that is brewing for drivers that can help you get the perfect job with a carrier. If ever you were looking at a job in the industry now is the time. Drivers that take advantage of that in a professional manner can map out there career success with the right strategy.

We have had a perfect storm brewing for many years in the industry. It started a few years ago with the amount of drivers coming into the industry or not coming into the industry causing a driver shortage. With fewer drivers entering the industry trucks were being left empty causing carriers to turn away business. A truck left empty is a major cost to a carrier even for a short period of time. This driver shortage was the first element of the storm.

Challenger truck

The second element of the storm was the implementation of electronic logging devices into the industry last year. With the implementation of electronic logs (ELDS) it caused some drivers and carriers to get out of the industry because of the regulations and it leveled the playing field on how goods are moved across the country. The playing field is equal because it now shows where delays are for drivers and companies are adjusting contracts to fit driver schedules.

The third element which is now coming into affect is the trading environment within North America with tariffs being talked about and the North American Free Trade issue in the middle of negotiations. We shall see how this plays out in the future but it will certainly affect the trucking industry in one way or another.

When you have a perfect storm like this in an industry it is either good or bad and this one is both. It is a rough time for carriers as they are trying to bring people into the seats and good for drivers because there are so many options for drivers with carriers. Carriers at this point are willing to get very creative to get people into the seats and it is now causing the industry to raise wages and benefits for drivers. The improvements however aren’t just monetary but improvements in carrier culture are also at the forefront. Carriers are now implementing focus groups and team meetings to find out what drivers want and many are improving communications and other benefits to make drivers more comfortable and happy. At the end of the day it is about making sure you as a driver are happy and have good place to go to work.

TTSAO-Carrier-Group-banner

What does this mean for you as a driver? It has been many years since driver rates went up the way they have over the last year and they continue to rise. You now have more power over your career options and can in many cases decide on the type of work you would like to do. Carriers are making adjustments in their fleet to keep drivers happy and keep them for the long term. For new drivers more carriers are implementing training programs to help drivers be safer and trained better and many are now looking at working with training schools which offers new drivers options right from the start. If you are thinking of getting into the trucking industry you could not find a better time. If you are not in the industry talking with a carrier or training school is the first place to start.

Find a TTSAO Certified School in your area

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Thinking of changing careers? Now is the time!

Thinking of changing careers?
Now is the time!

Recently the Truck Training School Association of Ontario (TTSAO) had a Hiring Event for those looking at the transportation industry as a viable career choice. The transportation industry is desperately looking for people to fill the seats of trucks and many other positions in the industry. In fact predictions from industry experts is that if we don’t get more people into the industry very soon there may be big consequences and price hikes for items on our store shelves. It has also been reported that the driver shortage is partially responsible for raising the rates in the industry for drivers. So if you were thinking of making that career switch, want to fill that dream of driving on the open road, or are tired of being laid off time after time then transportation may be the place for you?

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

People often look at the transportation industry in different ways and that can scare some off for the wrong reasons. Look at the news and you would think that all truck drivers are out to wreak havoc and mayhem on the roads. If you have had a truck tailgate you then you may think trucks are driven by wild people. Sure we have a few bad apples but for an industry that touches every part of people’s lives on the whole we do pretty well.

Over my 25 year career driving trucks I have seen more good men and women behind the wheel than what the media shows to the public. I have seen dedicated people travel through all kinds of conditions to reach places most people don’t even know exist. Without the drivers there would be no food on the shelves, parts for your car, or building materials for those new homes. Without trucks we would have very few exports as steel and lumber are our most popular exports to the United States and other Countries. So if you don’t think truck driving is an important job think again. Let’s get to the real point because I know very few drivers got into the industry to serve our Country although that’s what they’re doing.

People get into trucking for many reasons but stay because of the people, the work, and the opportunities. If you have ever worked in manufacturing or similar work you know that much of that work can come with layoffs at varying times or can be monotonous work. Transportation offers you some degree of independence, different environments on a daily basis, and the opportunity to meet new people, and see out wonderful Country.

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

At the latest TTSAO Hiring Event there were a large variety of carriers with work from city operations to long haul highway operations. You could get into the bus industry with a carrier like Greyhound, multiple carrier types in the trucking industry, or maintenance opportunities for mechanics and repair professionals.

There have never been so many opportunities in the industry as there are today. Investing in training for your chosen field can offer you a lifetime of opportunities for your career. If you’re not sure how to get started the best way is to contact one of the TTSAO schools listed in your area and meet them to learn more about the industry. If you are ready for a career change there is no time like the present!Find a TTSAO Certified School in your area

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Choosing the Right Job Based on Your Skills

Choosing the Right Job Based on Your Skills

The transportation industry is one of the largest industries in North America. The amount of people employed ranges in the millions and the type of work available fits every skill set. With such a large workforce and with so many different positions available how do you know what type of work is the best for you. Do you choose a job by money, location, type of work, job title, or a host of other criteria? Do you take a position based on hierarchy? All of these questions come to mind for someone new to the industry and unfortunately there is no one answer. If you ask most people already the industry they will tell you, “It depends”. What does that mean?

Girl-on-phone

When I started in the industry I was seventeen years old and didn’t even know what a truck was. My family had never had anything to do with the trucking industry, I didn’t have friends in the industry, I didn’t even know there was an industry. I just needed a job and started working for a company in the moving industry. That was at seventeen and I am now fifty-five years old and my career has more twists and turns than I can count and not one of them was on my goal list or suggested career path. I didn’t talk to a career counselor, I didn’t see where I would end up in the future, I just needed a job.

My career path looks like this; helper carrying furniture onto trucks, furniture driver with a “D” licence, furniture driver with an “A” licence, owner operator, city driver, long haul driver, specialized delivery driver, dispatcher, fleet supervisor, industry columnist, industry cartoonist, industry author, social media expert, transportation consultant, podcast host, television host, and entrepreneur. Every one of those positions have involved the transportation industry and still do to this day. If you look at the path after columnist the other jobs didn’t even exist so there is no way I could have said I was going to be a podcast host. For me the best thing I ever did was just get started in the industry and take opportunities as they appealed to me going through my career and I would suggest the same for most if they have some ambition.

If you are unlike me and prefer not to leave your career to chance there are some things you can do to choose the right position for you. You have to look at three things; the type of work you like to do, the type of work you are good at doing, and the type of training you have acquired.

The type of work you like to do?

The first place to start when looking for a position in the industry is to figure out the type of work you would like to do? Do you like to drive and see the Country? Then a long haul driving job may be good for you? Do you like to talk to people or have a great personality then a recruiting job may be best suited to you? Are you organized and enjoy fast-paced environments then a position as a dispatcher may be your calling? Like to fix things and tinker with machinery then a mechanic job may be best for you? Look at what interests you and start from there when choosing a position.

The type of work you’re good at doing?

The next area to look into is what type of work are you good at doing? Many of us have a natural talent for a certain type of work. Some people are good at administration and others hate it. Some are good at fixing things and others don’t like getting grease on their hands. Think about what you are good at doing and look for jobs that fit those skills.

The type of training you have acquired?

Have you had existing training in a particular area? If so that can be extremely valuable in helping direct you in a certain career. If you have had safety training in the past that may help guide you towards a position in the safety department. Lots of training is available in the industry so past training isn’t a necessity but can be very helpful if you have already achieved a certain skill set.

So if you are looking for a job or investigating a new career then the transportation holds many opportunities. The Truck Training School Association of Ontario (TTSAO) is holding a career fair on May 26th in the Mississauga area. You can learn more about the TTSAO Hiring Event by clicking the link below. Get out there and find the career for you!

Check out the TTSAO Hiring Event

Carrier-Group-Hiring-Event-Banner

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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Registration is now open for the PMTC’s ‘Driven to Lead’ program!

Milton, Ontario: Registration is now open for the PMTC’s ‘Driven to Lead’ program!

The ‘Driven to Lead’ program is an experiential, practical leadership program that will take participants through hands-on and impactful exercises focusing on topics like culture, teamwork, accountability and strategy. The program will be facilitated by Eagle’s Flight (www.eaglesflight.com), a global leader in education, at their facility in Guelph, Ontario.

pmtc-young-leaders-logo

The ‘Driven to Lead’ program consists of four separate full-day modules so participants can elect to complete the entire program or select individual modules.

Graduates of the entire program (all four modules) will receive free registration for the PMTC’s annual conference in June 2019 where they will be presented with their diploma. Graduates of individual modules will receive a certificate of completion for the module(s) they complete.

The program is intended for both up-and-coming and current leaders who are looking to advance and develop their personal and professional skills.

The program has been scheduled for the following dates:
September 19, 2018 = Creating a Culture of Accountability
November 21, 2018 = Building and Leading Teams
February 20, 2019 = Communicating for Impact
May 15, 2019 = Coaching for Results

Both PMTC members and non-members are welcome. Registration costs for the program are as follows:

PMTC member
Entire program (four modules) = $1,800*
Per program module (one module) = $500*
Non-member
Entire program (four modules) = $2,300*
Per program module (one module) = $625*
* Registration costs are subject to HST

To register for the entire program or individual program modules, e-mail info@pmtc.ca, call 905-827-0587 or click here to register online! More information about the training facility and program schedule will be provided upon registration.

A special thank you goes out to the ‘Driven to Lead’ program’s platinum sponsors, KRTS Transportation Specialists Inc. (www.krway.com) and TransRep Inc. (transrep.ca). Your support of this program has made it possible and we are truly grateful for your partnership.

This program is being offered as part of the YLG’s on-going mission to bring value to the next generation through education, discussions and networking.

Get out! Get involved! Get inspired!

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