3 Steps to Learning the Truck Inspection Process

Learning how to conduct a truck inspection can be a daunting task when you’re a new student in a truck training school. There are many parts to inspect on a truck or bus and missing just one area can result in fines and downtime for any driver. This is why the inspection process is so important and a reason that every student has to take it seriously.

I recently attended a school to understand their yard work program and what students thought of going through the yard work process. The testing procedures have changed since the implementation of Mandatory Entry Level Training and has become more challenging for the student. Previously the inspection process was taught as a routine that a student would learn and show when testing for their licence. Over the years the testing changed to a random item test where the testing agent will ask the driver to inspect different items on the truck in various orders. The student doesn’t know ahead of time which items will be asked of them therefore having to learn the whole process.

Talking to instructor Jean at the school conducting the training for inspections I asked how the new way of testing has improved the training process? “Students have to learn the full schedule 1 with the new system. Previously the students were taught a routine for inspecting a truck, but due to the time frame in testing were memorizing what to say more than what they were actually inspecting. Because the requests are random students have to know exactly how to inspect an item and not just what to say to the tester.” Says Jean.

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One of the things I noticed when attending the training is that the students going through the program took the instruction very seriously. As a trainer myself I can tell you that not all students understand the importance of training or have the same level of determination. The students going through the inspection schedule, asking questions, and redoing tasks they didn’t understand or do correctly were determined to understand the components fully. Those are the students that will pass successfully but also make professional drivers in the future.

If you are a new student or someone just getting started in the process of looking for a training facility then there a few things you can do to ensure your training is successful:

  • Ensure you are attending a certified training facility. Certified schools have the top instructors that have the knowledge to show you the proper way to inspect items.
  • Participate in the training. Many times the inspection process is taught in a group setting. Don’t just stand on the side lines but be active taking notes, doing tasks, and asking questions.
  • Take your training seriously. Failing to inspect a truck properly can result in fines, delays, or even death. It is important to take your training seriously, review your work, take notes, and ask questions of things you don’t understand.

Truck inspections are required of drivers every day and there are many that don’t do them properly. They are important from a safety standpoint, required from a testing standpoint, and can minimize delays on the road, but only if you know how to do a proper inspection.

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Philip Fletcher Presents on Carrier Based Training at TTSAO Conference

Philip Fletcher of Commercial Heavy Equipment Training will be co-presenting at the 5th Annual TTSAO Conference with Dave MacDonald of Revolution Staffing on Carrier Based Training during the Cocktail Party. Philip Fletcher won the Volunteer of the Year Award at the 4th annual conference.

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Philip Fletcher-Carrier Based Training Presentation

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Revolution Staffing Sponsors Cocktail Party at 5th Annual TTSAO Conference

Revolution Staffing will be the Cocktail Party Sponsor again for the 5th Annual TTSAO Conference happening in February 2020. Revolution Staffing has been a supporter of the TTSAO Conferences since day one. Thank you Revolution Staffing for helping us make our conference a success. Learn more about Revolution Staffing here.

TTSAO Conference 2018

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John G. Smith Master of ceremonies TTSAO 5th Annual Conference

Award winning Communicator John G. Smith will be the Master of Ceremonies for the 5th annual TTSAO Conference. Smith is well respected in the transportation industry and is sought after in the industry as master of ceremonies and panel moderator.

Biography

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John G. Smith is an award-winning communicator with almost 30 years experience in publishing and corporate environments. He is currently Newcom Media’s editorial director – trucking and supply chain. In this role he oversees editorial content for Canada’s leading trucking and supply chain publications including Today’s Trucking, Truck News, Transport Routier, TruckTech, Canadian Shipper, Inside Logistics, and Solid Waste and Recycling. Collectively, they have a circulation of more than 175,000 copies.

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Celebrating Truck Drivers on Both Sides of the Border

The second week of September is Driver Appreciation Week in the United States celebrating all the things that truck drivers do to keep our store shelves stocked, building materials on route, and cars in our driveways. Canada celebrated Driver Appreciation Week the first week of September.

The celebration weeks were set up to recognize the men and women driving up and down the highways of our Nation hauling goods that most of us take for granted. That bar of soap you just put in your grocery cart, that toothpaste you took off the shelf, or the meat that you will cook for dinner didn’t just appear on the shelf on it’s own. It went from manufacturing facility to distribution centre to the store. As a consumer you see a product on your store shelf and believe it came from the back stock room when in reality it may have traveled hundreds or thousands of miles to get to that moment when you picked it up and placed it in your shopping cart. If the trucks stopped in North America our store shelves would be empty in less than a week.

Truck drivers are the front lines of any trucking company but more importantly are the front lines to our economy. They keep North America moving and some of them take it a step further. Some are known as “Highway Angels” who are not only exceptional at their jobs but have stepped up to help save someone’s life. The Truckload Carriers Association recognizes certain drivers each year that have gone beyond the call of duty and helped someone in need. One such Highway Angel is John Weston a truck driver with Challenger Motor Freight that stayed with an accident victim during the last moments of their life. Weston didn’t think he was doing anything special, but that day hundreds of motorists passed by that same accident and didn’t stop. Being there for someone in their final moments of life is not to be taken lightly. You can read the full story here. http://ttsao.com/2018/03/28/theres-an-angel-among-us/

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Picture by Challenger Motor Freight

As you see those big trucks traveling up and down the road don’t think of us like the gear jamming crazy people that cause havoc on our roadways like much of the public does. Think of us as a hard working group of individuals that are keeping the products you love on the shelf of your favourite store. Think of us like the blood in your body. Trucks are the blood of our economy and without them the economy would die. You may also want to think about truck drivers as the one person that may be willing to stop and help someone at the side of the road.

Thank you to the many men and women truck drivers keeping our economy in tact. We appreciate the hard work that you do and recognize how vital you are to the economy. Thank you!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Females in the Trucking Industry are Featured at TTSAO 5th Annual Conference

Women in the Trucking Industry will be discussed at the TTSAO’s 5th Annual Conference in February 2020. Women play a vital role in our industry in all positions whether behind the wheel or behind the scenes in trucking. Join us for this important discussion and presentation at the conference.

TTSAO Hiring Event 2018

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PayBright Sponsors Instructor of the Year Award for 2019

The TTSAO started an award program for the Instructor of the Year at the 2019 Conference and is continuing it again at their 5th Annual Conference in 2020. The Recipient of the Award in 2019 was Joe Teixiera a 30 year veteran of the industry employed with Rosedale Transport.

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Read more about Joe receiving the award here.

PayBright will be sponsoring the award again this year so start thinking about who on your team will be a good fit for the award. Criteria will be coming out soon about the award and thank you to PayBright for sponsoring the award again for the 5th Annual Conference.

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Celebrate All Transportation Professionals

In Canada it is currently “Driver Appreciation Week” which is a week where we celebrate truck drivers for the work that they do in getting products on our shelves or materials into the hands of builders. Canada celebrates the first week of September and the United States celebrates the second week of September. We call the weeks ”Driver Appreciation Week” but really we are celebrating everyone in the transportation industry especially those on the front lines.

With that being said I personally feel that we should have a week for each area of transportation. That may also help in showing the public all the areas of transportation and the people behind the scenes. Should we have National Dispatchers Week, National Instructors Week, Load Planning Week, and other areas usually behind the scenes. A trucking company is a small team of dedicated professionals that have to work together to get a load down the road. If the load planners hadn’t arranged the load, then dispatch would not be able to do their job. Without dispatch truck drivers would not have anything to haul. We are all connected.

What about other people in the industry? We are starting to see changes and awards for other professionals in the trucking industry such as instructors, recruiters, and more. The last award winner from the Truck Training School Association of Ontario for Instructor of the Year was Joe Teixeira from Rosedale Transport. Teixeira has been in transportation for over 30 years and is truly dedicated to the transportation industry. He takes training and safety seriously and has been helping in keeping drivers fully trained and safe for many years. Without people like Teixiera and his dedication to safety we may not be celebrating drivers.

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Joe Teixeira – Instructor of the Year 2018

Should we rename the week? As a former driver I am in no way minimizing the job that the men and women driving have to do everyday. It is a hard and demanding job that requires a level of dedication that much of the general public doesn’t understand. If you asked all of those drivers you will find that there was someone who may or may not have been a driver that has been instrumental in helping shape their career. For myself it has been another driver that taught me to drive in the 80’s, a dispatcher that stood up for her drivers, a terminal manager that made me feel like family, and a company owner that invested in the those that took care of their equipment. They have all played an important part of my life and I still remember the many lessons they taught me.

Thank you to the drivers that go up and down the road each day, but even more thank you to all of you that are in the transportation industry and keep our economy moving. We salute you!

Nominate An Instructor on Your Team
at the 5th Annual TTSAO Conference

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Instructor of the Year Award Sponsor

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is the author of the books Driven to Drive, Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Striving for Success in Training

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