Transportation Risk management solutions inc joins ttsao

Please welcome Transportation Risk Management Solutions Inc. as a new associate member of the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario. Transport Risk management Solutions Inc offer safety and transport training solutions for the transportation industry.

Transportation Risk Management Solutions Inc.
Contact: Jeff Lehmann
Email: jeff.lehmann@transportationrisk.ca
Address:  292 North St., Elora ON N0B 1S0
Phone: 905-898-9167
Website: www.transportationrisk.ca

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Should you switch carriers for the money?

The fight for drivers is becoming intense as wages go up to attract talent. With salaries over $80,000 being promised by some carriers drivers are starting to perk up and look for work else where even though they may have been happy at their existing carrier.

I was reading a question the other day in an article where a spouse was looking for suggestions from other drivers as to whether her husband should move from one carrier to another as he was the sole income earner for the family. He was working for a good carrier, home every night, had seniority, Union support, benefits, etc. I won’t say the name but it is a well respected carrier in the industry.

As a single family income he of course is looking to make as much money as possible and feels he has reached his income potential with his current carrier. He is seeing the big offers by other carriers, applied for the job, and received an offer. His dilemma now, does he take the job? The new carrier is offering an over the road job and requires him to be away 5-6 days per week. The family is okay with that but will he really make more money?

speeding-truck

This is an important question that people don’t always think through because the salary potential gets in the way. We see the dollar signs and that can cloud our judgement causing us to make the wrong decision. Let’s break it down a bit more.

First the salary you see in an advertisement is often an average or above average salary of what is possible for a driver. If all the stars align you could make “X” number of dollars. It is against the law to put out false advertising so you could make that income if everything is right. The world of transportation doesn’t work that way however and each driver has their own work pace. Some drivers are slower, some have more experience, some have better travel lanes, some have certain equipment, so there are many variables when it comes to how much income a person can make even in the same fleet.

Delays are the next variable that can really hurt the income stated by a carrier. If you get delayed for long periods of time that can affect your earnings. Expenses on the road can take a large chunk of income from a driver. Like the driver above he was home every night, slept in his own bed, showered at home, and possibly took his lunch to work each day. If he takes the job over the road he may now have to pay for showers, buy meals on the road, and buy personal items and equipment for his truck. These are all expenses that many times comes out of the drivers own pocket and income.

If you leave one carrier to drive for another carrier that may give you a raise of $10,000 but if you have to put out more money for expenses you really aren’t ahead of the game. You’re just taking that money and giving it to the truck stop or other vendor. Do your homework if looking at new opportunities as they may not always be what they seem. It’s what you want for a career that’s important, not just the money!

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About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

you’ll get the best fuel efficiency by operating in your engine’s “sweet spot”

Fuel-Efficient Driver Training
The SmartDriver for Highway Trucking (SDHT) training program presents fuel‑efficient
driving strategies for drivers of tractor-trailers operating in an environment of
rising fuel prices and growing demands for environmental responsibility. SDHT
offers a flexible suite of online, in-classroom, and on-road training materials that
can be used individually or as part of a blended learning program.

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Fuel-Efficient Driver Training

The SmartDriver for Highway Trucking (SDHT) training program helps heavy‑duty
truck drivers improve their fuel efficiency by up to 35%. In addition to protecting
personal income and industry competitiveness, SDHT benefits include reduced
greenhouse gas emissions, less vehicle wear and tear, and increased safety.

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Final day for submissions is next Thursday, March 14, 2019!

Follow these 4 easy steps for your chance to be in to WIN the TTSAO SmartDriver Challenge:

1 – Driver tracks trip data over a pre-established route and enters the data in the Fuel Consumption Form’s Pre-Training Assessment column

2 – Driver completes the SmartDriver for Highway Trucking online “Fundamentals” training (45-60 mins) at: https://smartdriver.eduperformance.com/client?culture=en-CA

3 – Driver tracks trip data over the identical pre-established route and enters the data in the Fuel Consumption Form’s Post-Training Assessment column

4 – Email your completed Fuel Consumption Form(s) to admin@ttsao.com

Remember$1600 worth of cash prizes and MORE* to be awarded to participating Truck Drivers and Driving Instructors/Fleet Managers!

*The first 90 completed forms received will qualify for an HONORARIUM!

*Honorarium for submitting New Driver data: $50 – drivers with less than 1 year of commercial vehicle driving experience

*Honorarium for submitting Experienced Driver data: $200 – drivers with more than 1 year of commercial vehicle driving experience

CHET gives a presentation to the Peel Goods Movement Task Force

Hard on the heels of the Conference, I  was involved in giving a presentation to the Peel Goods Movement Task Force last Friday, and I now know that we, as a group (TTSAO) through CHET are accepted as a stakeholder in relation to Training.    A big plus for the Association to be among such an elite level of planners, logicians and academics in transportation. To view the information check out the link below.

https://www.peelregion.ca/pw/transportation/goodsmovement/pdf/goods-movement-strategic-plan-2017-2021.pdf

Truck Training is a Relationship

The TTSAO (Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario) had their 4th annual conference at the end of February with a lot of good information shared with attendees. There were new awards, many great discussions around truck training and how schools or carriers can work closely together. Check out the conference recap here.

A panel discussion led by Geoff Topping of Challenger Motor Freight and consisting on Leanne Quail of Paul Quail Transport, Matt Richardson of Kim Richardson Transportation Specialists Inc, Garth Pitzel of Bison Transport, and Philip Fletcher of Commercial Heavy Equipment Training talked about carrier and school relationships and how it affects students coming into the industry. One of the areas that I thought was interesting about the panel discussion was the fact that relationships between carrier, school, and student were extremely important in the success of a student becoming a professional driver.

Geoff-Topping

Schools are working closely with carriers and developing strong relationships because they understand that carriers are playing a major part in truck training even if they don’t provide it. I have always said to new drivers that their first point of contact should be with a carrier of choice to find out what type of training they require and if they work with certain schools. This allows a student to get training knowing they are able to be hired once they graduate from the school.

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Good certified schools also understand that truck training is more than just passing a test and that training is a foundation for your whole career. Having that relationship with a carrier allows a school to prepare that student for the carrier style of operation so the student is successful at the end of the training.

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Carriers are investing in a student when they sign on and much of their orientation is focused on competency and skills training when a new driver starts with the fleet. The carrier’s job is to groom that driver once they have the basic skills and working with certain schools is offering that comfort that a new driver has been trained to certain standards. Although many carriers have formal mentor programs they know that mentorship and training happens best when it is a natural fit between the new driver and trainer. Many of us can remember our mentor or trainer when we got started hopefully as good memories. Carriers realize this and are focusing on soft skills and the customer service side of the improving a driver. Trust is a main factor in a relationship between a school, student, and carrier. Careers, safety, and the future depend on it.

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As a new student or driver it is important for you to spend time building that relationship with a school and a carrier. Go to events and meet the recruiters. Call carriers and find out which school they work with in your area and why. Talk to the schools about their training programs and which carriers they work with to evaluate what job types are available. Start that relationship before you even choose a training provider and it will help streamline the process of becoming a truck driver. Not only will that save you time, resources, and money, but will also fast track you into a quality carrier right from the start. If you need help getting started then www.ttsao.com is a good place to start.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, and host of The Lead Pedal Podcast for Truck Drivers. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

TTSAO Welcomes 2019-2021 Board of Directors

TTSAO would like to introduce to you our newly appointed board of directors for 2019-2021. 

We look forward to working together over the next 3 years.  Thank you for your commitment to the TTSAO.

Please give a warm welcome and thanks to the following persons:

Board of Directors

Ken Adams, Chairman of the Board-Crossroads, Ottawa

Philip Fletcher Vice- Chairman, Commercial Heavy Equipment Training

Yvette Lagrois, Past Chairperson-Ontario Truck Training Academy

Sean Essner, Modern Training Ontario

Jack Lochand, Alpine Truck Driver Training

Brian Pattison, Northern Academy of Transportation Training

Kelly Perez, Zavcor Training Academy

Lesley de Repentigny, KnowledgeSurge Institute Trucking School

Ray St. Jean, Northstar Truck Driving School

Charlie Charalambous, Director of Communication and Public Relations

Mike Millian, Private Motor Truck Council of Canada

Lisa Arseneau, Chairperson, TTSAO Insurance Group

Guy Broderick, Chairman, TTSAO Carrier Group

Contracted Associates

Clarissa Maristela, Sara Fitchett Quest Consulting

Kim Richardson, President-TTSAO-TransRep Inc.

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Philip Fletcher Awarded Volunteer of the year 2019 at TTSAO Conference

Philip Fletcher of CHET was awarded the Volunteer Award for the Year for his dedication to the TTSAO association. Congratulations to Philip for winning a well deserved award.

Philip-Fletcher
Congratulations Philip Fletcher

You can learn more about the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario at www.ttsao.com

Striving for Success in Training

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