A trucking career is like painting a picture, you need to look at the whole thing!

As an artist when creating a painting it is important to step back once in while and take in the picture as a whole. This is especially true when working with very detailed media such as pen and ink as you can get into the zone as we say and forget to look at how that little area is affecting the rest of the picture.

The same issue happens when you use a GPS and don’t trip plan properly, you get caught up in the details. You watch your trip one turn at a time and forget to look at the whole trip letting you know about that low bridge 300 miles ahead that can stop a truck in its tracks. That’s why many experienced drivers will tell you that map reading is still the best way to trip plan because it allows you to look at the trip as a whole and also view alternative routes offering safer options.

Your career is very similar to the example above in the world of transportation. You have to look at your career as a whole and not just one year or a certain time frame. That’s where many new students coming into the industry go wrong, they look at their career from where they are now and not where they are going. They focus on the training aspect and view their future career within a short window of time. This can cause a disconnect because they could be missing vital opportunities with carriers and future positions.

Just like I do when painting I encourage you to step back from your training and take look at where you want to go in your career. One way to do this is to figure out what you are good at and how it can fit into your career in the future.

Let me show you how this fits into your bigger picture with a short example. I was doing a recruiting event years ago and met a lady that had been laid off from her position as a manager in the United States and was traveling back to Canada. She enjoyed the drive and thought truck driving may be a viable option. She went through the training with a certified school and was quickly hired on with a carrier in the area. After only six months working as a driver for that carrier she was promoted to being a recruiter which is where I met her. She kept that position for a couple of years before leaving to start her own transportation business in her home town. She combined her love of driving, her management skills, and her love of animals to create her own business transporting dogs around the Province.

My tip to many new people to the industry is to just get into the position of driving and take the training seriously. The transportation industry is so complex that you can’t figure it out sitting at a desk in a classroom. You have to get in, get your hands dirty, and do your best at the position you have. Once that is done opportunities will open up to those that are keeping their eyes open and know where they want to go with their careers. If you don’t know where you want to go then it is important to get experience and those details will pop up later on as you gain experience. Figure out what you are good at or enjoy doing and that will go a long way to helping you decide what opportunities you should take down the road. Just like my painting process take stock of your life by stepping back and it will help you create an amazing career in the future.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Check Out These Winter Maintenance Tips Every Driver Should Know!

Want to know why you can’t believe everything you see on television? Television shows are created for entertainment purposes and not factual information for the most part. Most drivers have seen the famous trucking show “Ice Road Truckers” at one point or another. I used to watch it but it got too ridiculous in the crap they were doing, like the episode where the driver had a truck where the heater didn’t work but he was told to go down the road anyway. So you are in Alaska in forty degree below zero and you are going to go trucking with no heat? Are you nuts? It dies however bring up a good point about winter maintenance which is why I started with this story.

Most people don’t think about winter maintenance in their cars ttsao truck at sunsetbecause they are in a local area, but you can’t do that with trucks. Many times you are driving in remote conditions and breaking down could be a matter of life and death. Early in my career we had a Winter where it dropped significantly below zero and everyone froze up on the road. Trucks littered the country at the side of the road. Being prepared certainly helped many drivers in that situation. So what should you do to prepare yourself for trucking in the Winter.

Truck Engine Maintenance

Inspections are one thing, but at the beginning of the Winter some extra checks should be put in place. Lets start with the motor. A winter service should include changing anti-freeze, possibly changing motor oil if required to a better grade for cold conditions. Take an extra look at items like wires and belts and hoses that may crack or break when cold weather sets in. Know your vehicle, cold leaks with diesels are common in the winter and may be hard to find as they are not noticeable at normal operating temperatures. If you are having any issues with your truck in the warmer weather it won’t get any better when the cold weather gets here so prepare properly.

Outer Truck Maintenance

With the outer truck there are a few items that should get extra attention. Tires of course are the important component for outside of the truck. Make sure tread depth, sidewalls, and pressure are all in condition. Brakes are a no brainer but I will mention them here. Look at items like rear end transmission components. Look for any holes in the cab and exhaust system as you will be running the truck much more than in other months. Check fuel, air lines and other under truck components that can cause issues in cold weather. Don’t forget to check, clean, or change batteries if required.

Inner Truck Maintenance

Think of all the things that will affect your driving ability. Mirror heater condition are important as is making sure doors and windows close properly. Checking that the in cab heaters and defrosters are working properly, remember heat is paramount. Safety equipment should always be checked but here is where you need to start preparing for the worst. In addition to your normal bedding throw and extra blanket, winter gloves, food, water, candles, matches, and winter clothing in the truck. Add note paper, pencils for leaving a note if required. What you’re making is a little survival pack in case you break down in a remote area. You may want to put it in a plastic container so things stay clean and can be stored under the bunk for emergencies.
The problem with trucks is that they are mechanical and even new ones break down. It is also common to get stuck in a storm or accident situation while on route so always be prepared for the worst. Hopefully you won’t need to use these items but I don’t think I know one driver that hasn’t had to use these items at on point in their lives. Don’t be a statistic in transportation, be prepared!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

If it’s sounds too good to be true it may not be for you!

Recently I was teaching a class of new students working on getting into the transportation industry as new drivers and the subject came up about carriers. It still boggles my mind that people spend so much time trying to find the perfect carrier. The reason I find it boggling is that there are really only a handful of carriers that can hire and train new drivers properly so I don”t see the issue. As I have mentioned in previous articles if you choose a reputable carrier you shouldn’t have to worry too much. I find many students that are trying to get the best job out of the gate by cutting each carrier up into segments that often they end up making a bad decision and end up in the wrong environment.

Students may be trying to avoid some work while they make great ttsao truck at sunset largemoney, but the opposite can also be true. What is a deal that sounds too good to be true sound like? A carrier promising you the world with no restrictions, a carrier promising you high wages for no real work, or any variation of this. You know the saying that says, “If it sounds too good to be true it probably is!” For students there is also another issue they need to worry about and that is training.

Many students think because they are in training now that the training ends when they leave the training facility. The truth is you will be in training for the rest of your life. For new students when you get hired on with a carrier you most likely will go through more training with the carrier. Carriers like Challenger, Schneider, and others have formal training programs that are required for a certain time frame and are great for new students. Other carriers may have smaller training programs that are more like an orientation style program, but are still important to bring new people on in a comfortable setting. Anyone under two years of experience can expect to go through some sort of training program with a carrier. The real question, is there compensation for such a program.

As a new student a training program will be part of your first job getting hired on with a carrier. As mentioned the length of the program can vary with different carriers with the normal range being of four to six weeks. As you are new of course you can expect to be paid a lower wage than someone who is experienced and ready to get on the road without training. The reason for this is that the company is using more resources to make the same money upfront. That investment upfront will pay off for the carrier down the road with a qualified and professionally trained driver. That being said you should still expect to be paid for the work you do. Many pay a flat fee for training and that is fine if you know it is for a set amount of time. If you are getting paid a mileage rate for your training it should be close to the industry standard. Most professional companies are within ten cents of the industry rate. If a rate is lower than that then you really need to investigate that company and ask some questions. If a company is paying you mileage for training ask them what happens when you are training in class? Are you paid a flat rate if you are training for dangerous goods or the like?

You may be a new student and new to the industry, but that doesn’t mean you should be abused. Look at the reputable carriers and you will get proper training and have a fulfilling career. A great place to start is on the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario website under affiliate members.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Hauling Produce Can Be Lucrative, But is It For You?

You have possibly heard the saying, “That if you got it a truck brought it!” Nothing is truer in the world of food. Trucks bring us everything from vegetables to meat and much more. Other than the few foods that people grow themselves the rest come from various places across the country depending on the time of year. Truck drivers operating in the world of food transportation can have very lucrative careers but does that mean you as a new driver should jump into that area of the industry?

The produce industry can be a very demanding part of the industry. What draws people to it are the high rates that it can pay to those wishing to dip their toes into this complex area of the transportation. Many new drivers get a false sense of big money, exotic places, and gleaming trucks because thats what they see from those already in the industry. It is not uncommon for owner operators in the industry to be making upwards of four dollars per mile. Produce comes from exotic locations like Florida and California so that attracts those that don’t like the East Coast of the United States. So you may think that the food industry is for you, but I will caution you to do your homework before settling into this area.

From a driver standpoint those same benefits that draw a driver to Truck on highwaythis part of the industry can also make it a huge headache. The high rates we talked about are there for a reason. There is a lot of waiting time in this area of the industry depending on what you haul and I am not just talking about hours, but days in some cases. There are many additional expenses in food transportation from fuel for refrigeration units to off-loading expenses, equipment washouts, and other incidentals. As a driver you may not see the rates we are talking about as many independent owner operators work this area. Length of days away from home also are part of being in the produce industry and those interested should be aware home time can vary greatly.

Am I trying to deter you from a life in the food area of the transportation industry? Of course not, I am just warning you to do your homework and investigate this part of the industry rather than just jumping in to get a job. The industry can be very challenging as far as timelines, dealing with distribution personnel, and equipment issues. I always tell people if you are interested in driving in this area of the industry try and find a carrier that focuses their resources on food transportation. That way you will have better equipment and better options when issues arise.

The largest problem in this area is you the driver. Do you have what it takes to be in this part of the industry? Are you dedicated enough to take the necessary care required for this type of freight? Do you have the organizational judgment to be on time and meet tight restrictions on food entering our Country? Do you have the flexibility for life on the road? If you can handle those issues then you may be a good fit to be a driver in the food industry. Only you will know!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Consideration, Communication, and Commitment is the Success Secret for Team Driving

With all of our jobs becoming more demanding and time consuming plus the fact that labour is getting harder and harder to find, husbands and wives are working together more these days. This has been a staple of the transportation industry in regards to team driving for many years. How do teams cope in the confines of a small space such as the cab of a truck? Consideration, communication, and commitment will help you be successful as a team.

You’ll need commitment so you can work together to be on the same page with the goals you’ve set for yourselves. Is it a profitable truck, a profitable small business or a successful family that you’re looking for?

Communication will be a key ingredient between you in order to keep moving forward. Not just the big goals and problems but the small ones as well. Although you may have different responsibilities within the team you will have to let the other person know what is going on in the business.

Consideration for the other person will be of the utmost importance Blonde woman truck driverespecially when we are talking the confines of a truck cab. I remember the time my wife mentioned us going trucking together. Of course not having a trucking background she did not understand how team driving works. There are no weekends in most companies due to delivery schedules and you actually run shifts from driving and other duties, not to mention getting a break from one another can be a creative process in itself. But when she mentioned we would have to bring our two cats I decided this wasn’t going to work in a practical manner. I was the driver who always kept his truck in show condition and that kept me busy without cats leaving their mark. In other words be practical with the goals you are trying to attain. In my years of driving over the road I have seen many couples succeed at team operations and the secret seems to be good communication and they work together for the common goal.

So how do you keep things moving forward? One way is establish duties for each other and respect them. You may think that the main focus of having a team is to share the driving responsibilities, but there is much more to it than that. Anyone who has run their own business and a truck operation is most certainly a small business knows there are many administrative and physical duties that need attention. Get into business routines you can both live with. Maybe let your wife handle the paperwork side of things with the exception of your logbook and you handle truck maintenance. She can handle those duties while you load the truck at customer’s warehouses. Maybe she has a more calming voice than you do, that will certainly go along way with dispatch. Whatever duties you divide remember you are working for the team. The goal is to earn a decent living in a safe and effective manner. A truck in bad repair or bad administration habits will do nothing to move your business forward.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Truck Drivers Deliver the Goods This Time of Year!

In the past the word “turkeys” has been used as a slang word to demean the truck driver. We know that truckers have a job where all of the odds are against them such as fuel prices, weather, time lines and increasing regulations. So, we know we’re not turkeys because you have to perform extremely well to link all of those items together to get the job done. Since it’s October, turkeys will be a Truck on highwaymainstay on dinner plates across the country and in fact many of you will be hauling those turkeys to different markets all over the country to give families a reason to come together and celebrate the holiday season. While people are praying and being thankful for the meal, they should be thankful that you’re sitting at the table with them, safe and sound. With all of the craziness and unforeseen weather extremes being seen these days it is certainly a blessing to have you join them at the table. Not only are you part of the industry that hauled the turkey so it was available for families to prepare for this special time of the year, but you beat the odds, faced the conflicts, and joined them at the dinner table. Be proud about what you have done, you’re a professional driver and you know this industry doesn’t have room for turkeys. This is a big month for those of you hauling produce and meat. You’ll bring goods from every part of the country to give the general public the items they need to prepare that Thanksgiving meal.
If you’re having trouble feeling your importance, think about what those Thanksgiving dinners would look like if trucking was not part of the puzzle. Think about it, the table would be empty. The turkeys and hams would still be on the farm. Only half of the vegetables would be at the table because the farmers would have had to truck the vegetables in via a farm tractor.
Unless you grow most of your own vegetables, your table would be very empty. Never mind the impact on our regular day to day lives, but in October we have two major celebrations in Canada, Thanksgiving and Halloween.
Add Halloween items to the food items and you have really increased the dependency on truckers in this country.
Imagine the kids coming to your door dressed as themselves because costumes didn’t “make it to the stores, or how about the thought of giving kids an “I owe you note” in their trick or treat bag because the chocolate bars and candy didn’t make it to the stores.
How about those pumpkins? Or lack of any? It will make for a very boring Halloween and many disappointed tables not having pumpkin pies for desserts. So you are the key ingredient if you transport any treat specific to the Halloween or Thanksgiving holiday season.
The kids won’t realize it, most of the public won’t realize how important you are, but we know who made these joyous occasions a reality, the trucker driver. Remember, you’re no turkey, the turkey’s are on the table.
Enjoy the holidays.
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Looking Professional Starts With You!

The trucking industry constantly amazes me with the stories I hear. Like the story of an instructor telling a class of new drivers that proper trip planning includes bringing a bottle with you to go to the bathroom while on the road. Unbelievable! That’s not trip planning, that’s camping!

We have all encountered the driver on the dock who has not Girl-in-truckshowered in a week. The driver that only does laundry once a month? In 25 years of trucking, I have seen them all.

Many people operating by themselves think no one else sees them so why bother looking professional. The truth of the matter is many people see you. Whether passing you on the highway, standing next to you in the fuel bar, or behind you in a restaurant, you are being seen all the time. You may be the nicest person in the world, but first impressions count and hygiene like that is sending the wrong impression.

We are expected to be professional in our driving capabilities and that translates into our appearance. I am in no way suggesting you wear a three piece suit while driving, but basic hygiene and dressing for the day are a prerequisite. Many people get into the trucking industry so they don’t have to cut their hair, dress properly, etc. The truth of the matter is more companies have come to realize that the professionalism of the driver is a direct reflection on the company and are paying more attention to driver’s appearance than ever before. Notice we have not even begun to talk about driving capabilities as of yet.

Whether you are new to the transportation industry or are a long time veteran, pay attention to your appearance, hygiene and equipment. It not only reflects on you, but the company you run for. With an industry frantically trying to change a bad image, if each of us takes pride in ourselves and our equipment, our professionalism will rise accordingly.

How do you do this? Plan where you stop! In 25 years of driving I have never used a bucket. Clean up before you arrive at your customer. If you do sleep on site at the customer’s dock, at least keep supplies in your truck and comb your hair so that you look presentable when they first see you. Presentation is everything, especially in trucking. Take your career seriously and professionally and you will climb the ranks with quality carriers. Try it and see!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Surviving in a Slip Seat Environment

You who may want to work for a company where slip seating is a regular part of the operation, but there are some things you may want to look out for a successful outcome. First, what is “Slip Seating”? Slip seating is where two or more drivers share the same vehicle. Maybe one driver drives the vehicle during the day and another at night. Slip seating can be a challenge for drivers that prefer their own space. Issues with cleanliness, vehicle abuse, lack of attention to maintenance, can all be common problems in some slip seat environments. Companies are not bad that slip seat, but as a driver there are some things to watch for when applying to companies with that type of operation.

Large companies can’t afford to have trucks sitting around empty

Blonde woman truck driver
s.

waiting for a driver or dedicate equipment to each driver. Trucks are big money and every parked truck is a loss of revenue. Depending on the operation, many companies have transport lanes and schedules that are just too complex to have one driver dedicated to each unit. So from a company standpoint, slip seating may be the most profitable way to operate.

What happens if you come across this type of operation as many of these types of companies are the top carriers in the industry? The biggest issues are usually cleanliness and maintenance. If a driver has the attitude that its not their problem it can make a truck operation hell to work in. Know what you want! Are you obsessive about cleanliness, do you have good maintenance habits? If so make sure the other person also has that same attention to detail. The time to ask about your preferences is during the hiring stage. If you are already in that type of operation and you see issues arising try some of the following options.

Ask for another driver for the unit to be of like mind. If possible, go meet that person and explain and agree on a system that works for both of you. Split on cleaning duties, and maintenance objectives. Believe me, there is nothing worse than arriving to depart on a run and realize clearance lights are out, or there is no fuel left in the tank. Find someone that knows how to handle post trip inspections. Any company worth their weight will appreciate a driver wanting to keep their image and equipment in top shape. It may take a couple of tests to find someone that you work well with.

Some of the top carriers that operate locally often have slip seat type of operations. The good ones will do their best to pair people together, such as two smokers together, or two clean drivers together. As a driver it is up to you to know what you are willing to do and how you like to operate. Be ready to fulfill your side of work obligations and you can make a slip seat operation work.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Trucking with Dignity

When you’re in the transportation industry dignity and distinction may be presented together or separately at any given time, or there may be days when both are present at the same time. You may not even know when they’re present, but you should because you control when they are present.
You may be asking yourself why this is important, why should you care? Well, it is important and you should care because it is about you! Dignity is about how you see yourself and distinction is how you are seen in the industry. Let’s talk about the distinction part first.
Most of us are seen as “truckers” in the eyes of the public. To some that means crazy, grease balled guys out to terrorize the highways. Ask most of the public who don’t understand us and we hog the roads, tailgate, and drive too fast or too slow, or are generally disrespectful of people on the road. That’s ‘‘distinction ‘‘in a negative way. Probably not the kind of distinction we or the industry is in need of at this or any point in time.
You and I know that the negative distinction stated above isn’t true. I‘m sure that most people who know you and others in the trucking industry also know how untrue that image is of the industry. The problem is that the public doesn’t know it.
The industry is ever changing and that may or may not give us a positive view depending on the time frame. One thing you can count on is that the industry is changing! You can either be a positive or negative part of this change, but unless you opt out of the industry, you will be part of the change.
This change has been going on for a while. The recruiting shortage we‘re in is part of the change, part of the process. We won‘t see how it has truly affected the industry until later, but it is part of the process. The question is how we make our distinction positive in the winds of change.
The answer of course is through dignity – your dignity, your Girl-in-truckself-esteem, your work ethic. By having dignity in yourself and your profession, you will create a positive image of yourself and the work that you do. By doing that, you will change the negative image of our industry because when you speak with other people about our industry you will speak about it in a positive light.
I know what you‘re saying. I‘m only one person, I won‘t change a whole industry. But think about this, what if each one of us chose to be positive about our industry from dispatchers, to drivers, to receptionists? How many people would we be influencing, one by one, across the country; one hundred and fifty thousand, five hundred thousand, a million? This system may seem idealistic, some idiotic way of looking at the world, or it could be one step closer to positive change. It’s up to you to decide. Word of mouth, that’s the best way to affect change, to sell something, or positively market something. Word of mouth!
“National Trucking Week” is upon us, if you’ve been negative about the industry in the past, then now is a good time to turn things around. The dignity part starts with you, if you are having trouble being positive about the industry, then maybe it’s time for a change in your thinking.
The distinction part is up to all of us. One by one, day by day! Are you doing your part? Celebrate “National Trucking Week” and treat it as a new start. You deserve it and we are all in this together. Start by thanking a transportation professional that you know. Thank you to all of you who strive everyday to make the transportation industry a better place.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Find out why you should say thank you to anyone in transportation this week!

It’s National Trucking Week in Canada this week and the United States next week. The two weeks are focused mostly on the work of the drivers in the industry and as a former driver I agree that drivers need to be thanked for the hard work that they do. In fact I have always said that National Trucking Week should be all the time or at least a whole month instead of a week, but drivers are just one part of the supply chain and it is important that we recognize others that make up the system or transportation environment.

Look at a basic transport team at a carrier. We have the management team that works with the contracts and getting new business. We have the planners that plan out the loads required to be hauled by the company. The loads are sent to dispatch who then communicates that information in a timely manner to keep the drivers moving, and the driver who has the lion’s share of work by getting the load to the customer safely and on time is extremely important.

No part of the system would work without someone doing that Girl-in-truckwork. Carriers couldn’t deliver freight without the driver. Drivers couldn’t get load information without dispatch and planning departments doing their jobs. Without the management team getting the contracts in the first place the other departments wouldn’t be required at all. Of course this is over simplified and there are many other factors that make a carrier operate properly, but I am sure you get the point.

Although the drivers are very much the focus of many carriers. There are also great people working behind the scenes of trucking companies across the country. I believe we need to celebrate all those people working in the transportation industry. The same goes for those working outside of a carrier for vendors that support the industry such as waitresses at truck stops, mechanics, service personnel and so on.

Let’s show our appreciation to all of those that make up the transportation industry. No matter who you are dealing with in the month of September or all year long for that matter say thank you. Thank a driver, say thank you to the mechanic that got you back on the road, say thank you to the dispatcher that keeps you moving, and thank all the other people keeping those in the industry employed and making money. Without the transportation industry we would have nothing on the shelves of our stores or in the cupboards of our homes. Thank you to all of you working in the industry and working hard to make it better!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Striving for Success in Training

Enjoy this website? Please spread the word :)