The Money Might be in the Work!

You’re sitting in class for a trucking school listening to the presentation being made by a recruiter thinking how much money will I make if I sign on with them? They go through their equipment list, their benefits, and training routine. So far it seems the same as the carrier that came in last week and then the recruiter says one thing, their pay rate. Your ears perk up and you sit straighter in your chair. At this point you are excited and begin to listen a little more intently. Then the final piece of information is given to you, you wait for the recruiter to spell it out and they do. They tell you the work involved in order to make that terrific salary. Your jaw drops and you have a sinking feeling in your stomach. Inside you say to yourself, ” They want me to do all that? No way!”

This is a normal situation for many students that are looking to enter ttsao truck at sunset largethe transportation industry. The situation started back in the eighties with “no touch freight” and has progressed even more as time goes on. Back then we had much of our freight on the floor and it was the driver’s job in most cases to unload the freight or stack it on pallets on the receiving end. There is nothing like standing at the back of a trailer with a full load of magazines on the floor knowing it is your job to unload them. Many drivers started looking for companies that had “no touch freight” because they didn’t like to hand-bomb, it was too back breaking! In today’s trucking industry much of the freight is no longer hand-bombed on a trailer with a few exceptions but has that made us lazy as drivers. What is worse is that you could be leaving big money on the table if you are looking for easy work in this business.

We all get to a point where our bodies will tell us that we have had enough when it comes to back breaking work. Like any industry the more you do something the more you get used to it and don’t see it as the same workload as someone who has never done the job. Think of an old brick layer that has been doing the job over many years, he no longer thinks about the work involved. His work is now an art that he can perform without thought. What I am getting at is that many of the best companies, the highest pay, and the best equipped carriers have some hard work involved. If you shy away from hard work you may be leaving big money on the table.

When I started in the transportation industry I was on the moving side where we moved people from house to house everyday. Some days I would do two to three moves in a day. When you do that professionally you don’t think of moving the way most people feel about moving themselves. You develop a system and go through the motions until the job is complete. When I hauled magazines we had to deliver to independent distributors, that meant we had to carry the bundles in one by one. At the chemical company our deliveries meant we had to push large drums into a location and then deliver the contents. When I was in the city many of our deliveries were either hand delivered or we walked them in to save time.

Even though these companies had us do hard work I look back over my career as a driver and they were some of the best companies that I have ever worked for. They had the best systems, paid great pay, had great equipment, and respected the work done by their employees. Not one of those companies did I leave due to the hard work involved with the position. So if you are trying to stay away from hard work you may be looking at the transportation industry in the wrong light. You could be leaving big money, a great work environment, and unique benefits on the table.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

TTSAO Gives Thumbs Up to MELT-Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  

May 31st, 2016 -­‐ Hamilton, ON  –  The  Ministry  of  Transportation ttsao logo of  Ontario  (MTO)  was  quick  to  react  to  the   Truck  Training  Schools  Association  of  Ontario  (TTSAO)  for  not  endorsing  the  draft  standards  of  Mandatory  Entry   Level  Driver  Training  (MELT)  in  Ontario.  After  numerous  meetings,  since  the  TTSAO’s  response  to  the  MTO  and   the  transportation  community,  the  association  has  agreed  to  endorse  the  current  draft  standard.  Senior   representatives  from  MTO  has  made  the  commitment  to  ensure  all  concerns  raised  by  TTSAO  will  be  addressed   prior  to  the  full  implementation  of  MELT  in  2017.

“Our  executive  team  and  board  of  directors  along  with  the  TTSAO  Carrier  Group  were  all  very  pleased  with  the   end  result  of  the  recent  conversations  and  commitment  of  the  MTO.  They  have  agreed  to  a  timeline  to  ensure   the  concerns  raised  by  our  members  will  be  dealt  with”  said  Kim  Richardson,  Chairman  of  the  Board  for  The   TTSAO.

In  a  recent  press  release  TTSAO  could  not  endorse  the  draft  standard  because  of  key  issues  still  being  left
unclear  to  the  association  and  its  membership.  These  concerns  included:

  • -­‐ Instructor  qualification  criteria
  • -­‐ Minimum  requirements  for  training  on  standard  transmission
  • -­‐ A  clearer  definition  of  on-­‐line  training
  • -­‐ Road  test  booking  procedures  and  vehicle  configuration  for  testing
  • -­‐ Night  time  training
  • -­‐ Maximum  training  hours  per  day
  • -­‐ Clearer  definition  of  hour  breakdown  of  in  yard  training
  • -­‐ Verification  of  training  hours

Mike  Millian  President  of  the  Private  Motor  Truck  Council  (PMTC)  and  board  of  director  of  the  TTSAO   commented,  “The  MTO  has  been  great  to  work  with  through  this  entire  process.  Their  engagement  with  all   stakeholders  has  been  appreciated,  and  necessary,  to  ensure  this  standard  was  a  close  to  perfect  as  possible.   Their  recent  response  to  the  TTSAO’s  concerns  was  appreciated,  and  showed  their  commitment  to  ongoing   engagement  with  all  stakeholders.  We  look  forward  to  continuing  to  work  with  the  MTO  on  MELT  going   forward”.

Some  of  TTSAO’s  issues  fall  under  the  Private  Career  College’s  and  the  Ministry  of  Training  Colleges  and   Universities.  The  TTSAO  and  MTO  have  agreed  to  work  together  along  with  the  TTSAO  Carrier  Group,  membered   insurance  companies  of  TTSAO  and  other  industry  stakeholders  to  ensure  all  areas  are  addressed.

Geoff  Topping  Chairman  of  the  TTSAO  Carrier  Group  and  Senior  Director  of  HR  at  Challenger  Motor  Freight   commented  “Great  progress  has  been  made  in  this  process  to  insure  the  MELT  Standards  meet  the  needs  of  all   Stakeholders  and  most  importantly  help  the  province  of  Ontario  to  be  leaders  in  Transportation  Safety.  Various   groups  and  associations  have  all  worked  together  with  the  MTO  to  insure  that  this  standard  will  produce  high   quality  drivers”.

The  TTSAO,  along  with  their  industry  partners  believe  that  keeping  on  track  with  the  timeline  set  by  the  Minister
of  transportation  is  important  for  all  involved  and  the  new  standard  for  entry  level  commercial  driver  is  critical
to  eliminating  the  licensing  mills  and  ensuring  entry  level  commercial  drivers  are  properly  educated.

For  more  information  about  this  Press  Release:  

Kim  Richardson  –  Chairman,  TTSAO  –  KRTS  office  –  1-­‐800-­‐771-­‐8171  x  201  or  cell  –  905-­‐512-­‐0254  or  by  email  at
krichardson@krway.com

Mike  Millian  –  President,  Private  Motor  Truck  Council  of  Canada  –  Office:  905-­‐827-­‐0587,  Cell:  519-­‐932-­‐0902  or
by  email  at  trucks@pmtc.ca

Geoff  Topping  -­‐  Director  of  HR,  Challenger  Motor  Freight  519-­‐653-­‐9770  ext.  2624  or  by  email  at   GeoffT@challenger.com

Charlie  Charalambous  –  Director  of  Public  Relations,  TTSAO  –  Northbridge  Office  -­‐  1-­‐800-­‐265-­‐7173  or  cell  (416)
473-­‐3986  or  by  email  at  charlie.charalambous@nbfc.com

Are You Trying Too Hard to Get The Perfect Job?

Finding the perfect company to work for in your career can be a daunting experience and one that many folks may never find over the span of their careers. We all want that perfect place to call home. We want good salary, benefits, and a professional culture. We want a safe and stress free environment so that we can go home to enjoy the fruits of our hard work with our families. If someone says they don’t want that then they’re lying! That’s a pretty tall order for anyone to find in one employer especially a new person. This is where the problem may lie in new people entering the transportation industry?

There is a recruiting shortage, no news there! In Ontario we have a program called “Second Careers” which helps people who are transitioning to a new career, trying to gain new employment, or looking for new opportunities to get into the the transportation industry. It is set up to help the industry and get people back to work. The problem is that the people are not always young and may be looking to improve their careers from the last employer by finding the perfect company.

In the transportation industry like many other industries you have to ttsao truck at sunset largework your way up the ladder. As a driver you must get competent training, become a master behind the wheel, have good people skills, and a host of other traits to make you successful. It is not a process that you can rush, but can be mastered over time with hard work and dedication. Many of the new people coming into the industry however are not looking to start over in their careers. Many are mid-life and looking to improve so they can advance from where they were before they started in the industry. I see it all the time in my training sessions with new students, they are all trying to find the perfect job out of the gate. In fact this seems to be a trait of the new generation from many employment reports.

If you are one of those new drivers that are looking for that perfect opportunity then my suggestion to you is just get started. You may not want to start at the bottom but you have to start somewhere and you can’t start at the top unless you start your own business. If you are in a training school it is very easy to get started if you follow the advice of the instructors and work with the carriers that associate with the school. You only have so many choices as a new driver so choose the one closest to the goals you have for an employer. Just pick one! The drivers that get into trouble when looking for a job are the ones that try to beat the system and go right to the top. They usually end up working for someone that doesn’t treat them right or causing them larger problems.

You may have to get creative to get a great job but it can be done. If you want to be home more then try finding an employer that has a flexible open board. If you want to try different opportunities find a company that has different types of equipment. Just get that experience that will help you move forward in your career. Get out there for two years, learn all you can and you will see that many opportunities will open to you after that. You have to start somewhere so just pick a respectable carrier and get started!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Insurance-The Reason for Working with a Reputable Carrier

Drivers don’t normally think about carrier insurance as an item they should be concerned with, but this article may make you rethink that issue. After all, I have never had a driver ask me about our company insurance when I was in a supervisory position. I have never thought to ask a company in an interview about their insurance situation. We assume that the carrier is insured for their needs and work on getting hired. Read on and find out why you may want to add the insurance question to the list of items you should be asking a carrier.

I was talking with a former student who was in my class in a training school not to long ago and she was telling me a horror story that happened to her sister whom was also a new driver. Her sister had taken a job with a carrier that offered her a job as a new student. She made the classic mistake of not looking far enough into the carrier to see if they were operating above board. Things went well for a while until an incident happened and she was informed by enforcement officers that she didn’t have the correct insurance. When the company was questioned about it they had not paid the premiums and left this poor driver saddled with the financial debt of the incident.

In another incident owner operators working for a carrier assumed they were covered properly with insurance for their trucks and any incidents until one had a major accident. It was found that the carrier had not kept up with premiums for the fleet and the driver that had the incident is now left trying to work with legal teams to battle the million dollar hospital bill left behind.

As a driver or owner operator signing on with a company it may be a Truck on highwaygood idea to add the insurance question to the list of questions you plan to ask a carrier in the interview stage. The first step to making sure you are insured properly is to look for reputable carriers. The top carriers are not running around without the proper insurance for their fleet, they have too much at stake for that. The main areas of insurance you will need is accident, cargo, and medical insurance.

So ask theses three questions about insurance in the interview stage.

  1. What happens if cargo on my trailer is damaged, who pays for that?
  2. What happens if I am in an accident, how am I covered?
  3. The third question is what happens if I am in an incident and hospitalized outside of Ontario? How am I covered and what is the company prepared to do for me or my family? If you don’t get appropriate answers to your questions then run. Make sure once you sign on with a carrier you have the insurance items in writing.

As a new driver you may feel that any carrier that is willing to hire you is doing you a favour, but that isn’t true. Protecting yourself and your career are very important especially in the beginning stages of your career. I see many new drivers saddled with problems early on because they are not taking the right amount of time to check into important areas of the job like insurance. Work with reputable carriers and you will take away a lot of the problems in your career.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

TTSAO Responds to MTO Mandatory Entry-­‐Level Training Standards  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

May 18, 2016 -­‐ Hamilton, ON  -­‐  The  Truck  Training  Schools  Association  of  Ontario  (TTSAO)  have  responded  to  the   MTO’s  proposed  Mandatory  Entry-­‐Level  Training  (MELT)  standards.  The  TTSAO,  along  with  industry  subject   matter  experts  from  various  carriers,  training  institutions  and  insurance  fields,  were  among  a  task  force
designed  to  provide  input  and  feedback  on  the  proposed  new  standards  for  Class  A  drivers  in  Ontario.

The  TTSAO  is  thankful  for  the  opportunity  to  be  included  in  this  task  force  and  would  like  to  thank  the  MTO  and   all  of  the  industry  stakeholders  that  participated  in  these  meetings.  TTSAO  membered  schools  collectively   produce  more  entry-­‐level  commercial  drivers  annually  than  any  other  association  or  education  entity  in  the   Province.  TTSAO  members  were  provided  the  opportunity  to  review  the  draft  standards  and  provide  feedback  to   their  Board  of  Directors.

The  TTSAO  believes  that  great  strides  have  been  achieved  towards  what  the  MELT  standards  should  look  like   however,  before  it  can  be  fully  endorsed,  the  following  suggestions  were  made  recommending  that  further   discussion  is  needed:

• Instructor  qualifications  must  be  addressed
• Minimum  requirements  for  training  on  a  standard  transmission  should  be  included
• A  clear  definition  of  on-­‐line  education  is  required
• Procedures  for  booking  of  road  tests  should  be  included
• Vehicle  configurations  for  training  and  testing  need  to  be  clearly  defined
• Observation  time  in  the  training  yard  should  be  included  in  the  defined  hours
• Night  time  training  should  not  be  a  requirement  of  the  standard
• Maximum  training  of  6  hours  per  day  in  cab  in  unacceptable
• Clearly  defined  documentation  to  verify  training  hours  are  met  is  required

Kim  Richardson,  TTSAO  Chairman  of  the  Board,  says  “The  TTSAO  believes  that  great  progress  has  been  made  in   the  new  proposed  MELT  standard  but  additional  edits  and  input  are  still  needed.  We  understand  that  the   government  is  on  very  strict  timelines  to  complete  the  standard  but  it  is  imperative  that  as  an  industry  we  get  it   right  the  first  time.  The  TTSAO  is  happy  to  continue  our  participation  in  the  task  force  to  ensure  that    we  help  to   raise  the  level  of  entry  level  candidates  entering  the  industry”.
 For  more  information  about  this  Press  Release:  

Kim  Richardson  –  Chairman,  TTSAO  –  KRTS  office  –  1-­‐800-­‐771-­‐8171  x  201  or  cell  –  905-­‐512-­‐0254  or  by  email  at
krichardson@krway.com

Charlie  Charalambous  –  Director  of  Public  Relations,  TTSAO  –  Northbridge  Office  -­‐  1-­‐800-­‐265-­‐7173  or  cell  (416)
473-­‐3986  or  by  email  at  charlie.charalambous@nbfc.com

PMTC AND TTSAO VIP DAY AT FPI/PIT TEST TRACK IN BLAINVILLE, QC

Come out and enjoy the PMTC and TTSAO VIP day at the FPI/PIT test track in Blainville, QC. See the attached flyer for more details.

We are arranging a coach bus to take us all to the track. The bus will depart Caledonia, Ontario at 9 a.m. on Monday, June 6th. Stops wil be made at the carpool lots at 401 and Trafalgar Road (Exit 328), 401 and Brock Road (Exit 391), and 401 and Percy Street (Exit 497). Stops further east can be added if needed.

pmtc logo

The bus will take us to the Days Inn near the track, and we hope to arrive before 6 p.m. on the 6th. A block book of rooms is avaliable by calling 1-800-561-8719, and referencing code “PMTC”. Our rate is $119.00. The block is only being held until May 15th, after that date it is first come first serve. Once numbers are confirmed we will make a reservation for supper at the hotel restaurant.

The bus will depart for the track the next morning at 8:30 a.m. The bus will depart for home at 4 p.m. at the conclusion of the days events.

Cost per person round trip is $250.00 per person including HST.

In order to confirm costs and times, we ask that you reserve your spot by May 20th.

If you are coming from regions outside of the 401 corridor, you may still reserve a room through the block booking, and utilize the bus from the hotel to attend the events at the track for a cost of $20.00 for just the bus. You will need to find your own way to the hotel, and notify Vanessa if you will be taking the bus from the hotel to the track.

Contact Vanessa at info@pmtc.ca to reserve your spot, or for more information.

Don’t Put Me at Risk, Because You’re in a Hurry!

Defensive driving is about watching out for the other guy! Our highways are getting busier all the time and Toronto is now known as one of the busiest cities in North America. In fact Brampton Ontario is on the map as a city having the highest insurance rates in Canada and beyond, even in the United States. Much of this is due to the fact that our lives are so busy and the model of going to work from nine to five has now been diluted to various times through the day. In years past it was possible to leave after traffic or before rush hour to get to your destination. There were specific times when traffic flow stopped and started. Now anytime of day can be rush hour in big cities and planning for that becomes even more important. If you don’t plan for traffic you may be putting yourself at risk!

I am laughed at in the industry for being extremely early for appointments. If I have an appointment at 9:00am in the city you can usually find me at a coffee shop in the area at 6:00am. Even my wife thinks I’m nuts for leaving so early for appointments. Being early has been a rule for me to live by and I feel very relaxed when I do it. I may lose a little sleep but I am less stressed for the day. The other day I had an appointment and decided to follow others advice and leave later than normal, believe me I won’t do that again!

I had an appointment in Mississauga for 10:00am. Mississauga from Truck on highwaymy place is about thirty minutes in good traffic and an hour when it’s busy. I had a couple of options for routes including the 407 ETR a toll road in the area. Traffic was moving and all was well that way, but its how they were moving that was causing me problems. Doing the speed limit in the area is a real challenge and I notice as I get older I have been going slower on the roadways. Not super slow but to the point where I am at the speed limit or just above. Traffic is usually travelling around twenty kilometres above the limit as a rule in this area so driving the speed limit you are driving twenty kilometres slower than the rest of traffic on the road. This is where the problems came in.

As I was driving in the right lane at the speed limit here is what happened. I had a driver in a rental truck almost hit me from behind because he was looking at something on his dash. I had to move to another lane to avoid him hitting me. I had three other cars tailgating me because they were in a hurry to get to their destination. Finally the best one was the driver that was in so much of a hurry she almost tried to pass on the shoulder of the road and when she did get around me gave me the finger because I was doing the speed limit. To say I was stressed would be an understatement.

I got to my meeting early but the stress getting there was not worth it for me. I felt in danger, not because of my driving but due to the other people and their erratic driving. Everyone was in a hurry and many forgot the basic rules of lane management, speed limits and so on. Road rage is a fact of life on our roadways, but even if you are doing things correctly you can’t control the other people around you. Taking yourself out of that situation is the best way avoid problems. As that old reporter use to say on the local news as he did traffic, “Watch out for the other guy!” I myself will be going back to leaving very early and avoiding the rat race on our highways. As a professional driver you may not be able to avoid the idiots on the road, so that makes trip planning extremely important. Do whatever you can to be safe and avoid the crazy drivers. As for me, I will see you at the coffee shop!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Get Your Street Smarts-Age Doesn’t Equal Innocence!

Every time I teach a class of new students about the transportation industry I tell them to get street smart right away. If you have read any of the carrier ads in magazines you will see that many focus on people and are starting to get away from just talking trucks. The business of transportation may be about moving freight, but really the industry is people based. As a professional driver you are dealing with people at every turn. You have dispatchers that give you the loads, shippers that load the truck, the fuel bar person, the waitress, the receiver, the scale house, and so forth. You are always dealing with people and these are the good ones.

There are a lot of bad people out there as well. Just watch the news and you will see that there are bad people everywhere and it is important as a driver that you have your wits about you. You are a big easy target to the criminal types that prey on the non-aware. You have a large slow vehicle that is easy to catch. You have freight that has value no matter what it is. You are from out of town and may be unfamiliar with the area. The final piece is that you may be only one person and not able to protect yourself. Every large city and some small towns have a criminal element and if you have some street smarts you can usually get out untouched. Sometimes however we get fooled because the people or surroundings are out of character for what we expect from the criminal type of person. This happened to one driver at a construction site.

This was an actual story on television last year where the driver of a cement truck reported that his truck had been stolen in the middle of the day. A police chase ensued as the truck was reported driving carelessly around town. The police chase went on for over an hour as the truck barrelled down streets creating havoc in town. When the authorities removed the bandit from the truck they were amazed at who they found behind the wheel. The bandit, the freewheeling truck thief, was an eleven year old boy. Apparently he always wanted to drive a cement truck!

This eleven year old boy certainly didn’t fit the profile of a criminal. He wasn’t lurking about late at night. He didn’t hang with a group of unruly characters. He wasn’t hanging out on the streets of a bad area. He was just a kid! If you watch the news you will see that many of the criminals are getting younger and younger these days.

As a driver it is your job to keep your truck secure and even though ttsao truck at sunset largeyou have no control of other people you need to do the best you can to keep your self safe and prevent theft. Criminals are a sneaky group after all that’s why they’re criminals. As a professional driver doing the basics for theft prevention will help keep you safe for the most part.

Here are some basic steps you can take.Proper trip planning is key! Know the area that you are going to and get directions from trusted sources such as other drivers, the customer, or your company. Always lock your vehicle and shut it down when you are not using it. Watch who is around the area and stay away from times when criminals lurk and are looking for easy targets. Don’t tell people on the radio or at truck stops where you are going and the type of freight you have on. This article isn’t meant to scare, but to educate that as a driver you always need to be on your game.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Could Social Media Be Putting an End to Your Career?

Are you putting your career in jeopardy with social media? Social media is part of our lives now whether you believe in it or not. It doesn’t matter how old you are, how technologically savvy you are, or how much you go kicking and screaming that you will never be online, its here! Whether you choose to participate or not is up to you? The real question is will it be a show stopper for your career?

Here’s the thing! If you are on social media and use it to air your Twitter-birddirty laundry then it may work against you when looking for employment. If you don’t use it then you may have trouble applying for positions because everything is online. Let me explain.

I recently had a friend go through some hard times with his job. Nothing serious but his boss and him weren’t seeing eye to eye on a few issues. He was starting to get pretty down about his job and started airing his feelings on social media. There are two things that are troubling about this. One is that his boss may be watching him or may be connected to someone who is following my friend therefore seeing many of the things being said about him. This may be terminating his job faster than he realizes.

The second issue is even if his current employer is not watching him those comments will be there for future employers to see possibly costing him a good position in the future. You may remember on the news a few years ago about a British Columbia politician that had an excellent record of helping people and was a person regarded as “salt of the earth”. He was running for a top seat in the political area in the Province. Due to a social media post about a party he had attended at the age of twenty five years old he ended up having to withdraw from the race. All because of a video he was in when he was young.

If you aren’t on social media at all then people have nothing to look up or reference. Remember the old days when you just gave a personal reference or the employer called to verify your employment. Employers don’t like to give references any more and friends aren’t a trusted source for information so employers are now looking people up online. If they find nothing there they may feel you have little to offer.

Now I am not suggesting that you can only get a job if you are online. This is however becoming more of the normal process these days and what you put out there has a lasting effect on your future. The last time I went for a job interview years ago I walked into the company office and they brought out a file on me larger than the one I had on myself. They had found articles I had written and information that I forgot that I even had produced. That’s why I have to live clean now. The point is that if you have ever filled out something online whether a survey or the like then you are online. If you have a social media profile then you are even more online.

Here are two rules to keep you out of trouble online. First never post anything about your employer or past employers on social media. Remember the saying, “If you can’t say anything nice don’t say anything at all!” Two, never put anything on social media that you wouldn’t let your Mother see. If you follow those two basic rules they should keep you out of trouble for the most part. I wish you luck!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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