The Private Motor Truck Council of Canada has announced regional seminar-Thursday January 26th in Guelph, On.

For Immediate Release

Milton, On: The Private Motor Truck Council of Canada has announced it’s next regional seminar in it’s ongoing series of Cross Country Educational half day conferences. The next seminar will be held on Thursday January 26th in Guelph, On.

The seminar will run from 8:30am to 11:30am and will cover two topics, which will bring value to employees and employers from many different sectors of the Transportation industry. One of the advantages of being a member of the PMTC is that the PMTC actively seeks opportunities to provide its Members with access to leaders in the trucking industry who provide practical solutions which can be implemented into everyday policies and procedures.

The Topics being covered are 3rd party Contracts and Mandatory Entry Level Training

3rd party contracts between shippers and carriers

Private fleets are in a unique situation when compared to for hire carriers, or shippers of products. While Private Fleets main purpose is to deliver the product or service of it’s parent company to it’s customers, in almost all cases, in addition to utilizing their own Private Fleet, some of the company’s products will also be handled by for hire or dedicated contract carriers. This being the case, the parent company that the Private Carrier belongs to, must ensure it has proper 3rd party contracts in place to protect its products and customers. More and more, Private Fleets are also using backhauls to subsidize their private fleet operations. In this case, the fleet becomes a for hire operator for a period, and as such, they must ensure that any 3rd party contract that they sign does not put them in a legal black hole should a claim occur.
In this seminar, Richard Lande and Heather Devine, two of this country’s most prominent Transportation lawyers, will take attendees through what needs to be in a contract to protect their interests.
“Many companies do not have comprehensive contracts in place with 3rd party trucking companies”, explains Richard Lande. “Many shippers mistakenly believe a carrier may shy away from such a document, when in fact many best in class carriers will have their own contract to recommend to their core customers”
Richard and Heather’s presentation will review a standard contract and explain the “must have” clauses, as well as the non-essential clauses which are non-the less beneficial. They will also discuss additional elements that must be found in specific contracts for hauling such products as TDG, pharmaceuticals and food products.
Lastly, now that you know what should go in a contract between a shipper and carrier, the duo will take you through the steps on how to effectively implement the contracts.
Mandatory Entry Level Training

As of July 1st, 2017, no one will be able to challenge a full class A road test in the Province of Ontario without first completing and passing a mandatory entry level training program that has been approved by the Province, and provided by a Training Facility that has also been approved by the Province. What will this mean for the transportation industry? How will the supply of drivers be affected? In this seminar, Kim Richardson, the Chairman of the TTSAO, and the President of KRTS, will take attendee’s through the Mandatory Entry Level Training Program in the Province of Ontario, where we were, our current state, and what it will mean going forward.
Register now
Space is limited, so people are encouraged to register early by contacting Vanessa Cox at info@pmtc.ca. Registration is just $25 for a PMTC member, and $100.00 for a non member. Sponsors are also being welcomed, if you are interested in sponsoring the event, please contact Vanessa for details. Location details will be provided upon registration.
About our presenters

Richard Lande
Richard Lande, Senior Partner for the Private legal practice of Lande and Langford, has specialized in Transportation Law for over 40 years, and has offices in Ontario and Quebec. Richard’s recent focus has been assisting companies with their driver and shipper contracts, helping deal with issues pertaining to freight brokers, as well as contesting Highway Traffic Act violations. Richard is a current elected Governor of the Quebec Bar Foundation. Richard has authored eight law books over his years in the law practice. He graduated from McGill University, University of Montreal and Bath University (UK) with a PhD in Transportation Management. He was the first Canadian to win the Railway Medal, given by the Chartered Institute of Transport. He has also been a transportation Fellow at Oxford University, as well as a visiting Fellow at the Bureau of Transport Economics in Australia.  His legal practice encompasses manufacturers, as well as carriers in Canada and the United States.

During his career, he has formed over 20 purchasing groups and among them, one represents some of the manufacturers of the finished vehicles in Canada, such as BMW, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volvo and Subaru. Richard has organized a transportation conference in Toronto for the past 30 years (www.transportconference.ca)

Richard has been the President of National Transportation Week, as well as the Canadian Division of the Chartered Institute of Transport.

Heather Devine
During her fifteen years of practice, with appearances in all levels of Provincial and Federal Courts, in Ontario, Nova Scotia and Alberta, Heather, of Isaacs and Co, frequently embraces complex, challenging matters where victory is not obvious.

Heather develops and implements the strategy, budgeting and case management of complex litigation for private, public, national and international clients.
Recently Heather has expanded her focus to assist clients with contracts and agreements to minimize their risk. She ‘Canadianized’ the TIA shipper-broker, broker-carrier agreements as part of her work on the Transportation Intermediaries Association Contract Committee. She has experience advising clients how to risk manage the movement of bulk commodities, foodstuffs, perishables and hazardous materials.
Kim Richardson
Kim Richardson has been in the transportation industry for 34 years. Currently he is the President of KRTS Transportation Specialists Inc. a multiple award winning family owned and operated business. Under the KRTS group of Businesses is Transrep Inc. and The Rear-View Mirror. Kim is currently the Chairman of the Board of the Truck Training Association of Ontario (TTSAO), Board of Director of the Professional Truck Driver Institute (PTDI). He is the past Chairman of the Board for the Allied Trade Division of the Ontario Trucking Association (OTA) and a Board of Director with the Private Motor Truck Council of Canada (PMTC) representing the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario(TTSAO). Kim is a proud husband, dad, grandpa and loves his community, Caledonia, Ontario.

Are you ready for extreme winter weather?

We are into the time of year when the weather can be very unpredictable. It’s dry and warm in one spot and snowy and cold in another. Driving across the country can take you through almost every type of weather pattern imaginable. Driving from East Coast to West Coast will have you travel through tornado zones, snow storms, extreme heat, and hot sun. Even worse that may be all in the same trip. Professional drivers know the changes that may lay ahead and prepare for anything. It is not a matter of if, but when you will experience these things. Count on it! Many new drivers don’t listen to the experienced drivers and do things based on their experience. That is where many go wrong just like new driver Jim experienced below.

Jim was one of those people who felt that he could beat anything, he was a new driver with only a couple of years experience and was just starting to be awarded longer runs. He had never experienced any problems on the road other than traffic and the odd driving rain.

The company had been awarded a special contract running freight into Denver Colorado. Two trucks would be sent with specialized freight and the boss thought it would be a good learning experience for Jim as he was sending one of his most experienced drivers in the other truck to help him along. Jim was warned that the weather can change drastically in that region and to be prepared for the worst. Unfortunately the worst that Jim had experienced was considered the best for some so he didn’t think of things other than a heavy coat.

The trucks roared out onto the highway. Nothing but clear sailing for the pair and they made good time their first day. The only thing that Jim noticed about his partner was that while Jim had been buying things like chips and pretzels for the road his partner was stocking up on canned goods and crackers. When Jim asked why he was buying that stuff the old timer just kept saying, “You never know!” Jim didn’t understand. After another day of decent weather and then things started to change, the mountains had a way of creating unexpected changes in a hurry. As the snow started to fall it changed in intensity and turned icy at the same time. As they approached traffic stopped ahead the C.B wrung with chatter about the set of trains that had flipped over at the bottom of the hill closing the road. They were now idle with an unexpected wait time ahead. As the hours passed hunger set in. Jim had run out of junk food and was concerned it would be morning before things got underway. The thought alone was making him hungry. With the weather it turned out to be a 10 hour wait before the accident was cleaned up. Thanks to an experienced driver, and some canned goods and crackers hunger for Jim would have to wait for another day.

I have seen this happen many times to drivers who fail to prepare for winter weather. This happens to many who start out in mild climates not thinking of the different weather patterns they may encounter on their travels. I have been in the same situation as Jim having to sleep in the middle of a closed Interstate while an incident is cleaned up. You have no idea how long it will take to get things moving or where you may have to travel to go around the incident. In winter weather consider your fuel tank empty if you are half full, keep food in the truck, an emergency kit, and warm clothing and blankets. You never know when they may come in handy.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Is the race circuit for you?

If you like chrome, being treated first class, or knowing what you are doing for the whole year then you will love the racing circuit. What is the racing circuit for truck drivers? The racing circuit for truck drivers is what we call the ‘Cadillac’ of all trucking jobs. It is the job that most of us strive for in our whole career, but it always seems just out of reach for most of us. That doesn’t mean it is out of reach for you, you just have to be aware of the benefits and downsides to the industry. Then it is up to you to prepare for it.

The benefits

I like to think of race transportation like a hypnotic crystal ball. If you look at the bright light you will go into a trance and operate in a robot like condition. This part of the trucking industry is that addictive. Just look at the benefits. Usually you have the best equipment available, race teams are usually well funded and need to operate on a competitive level with other teams so the best is important. It is not only good equipment, but is what I call ‘pretty’ as race transportation is about image and brand as much as racing.

If you want to be paid well and treated like the King or Queen of transportation this area of the industry is also a great draw for drivers. Normally many years of experience are required to be accepted as a driver in the industry and drivers are paid well due to the amount of care and attention required to the equipment.

Other benefits are the fact that you are on a circuit and will always know where you are going and often will be traveling with the other teams on the circuit. You will have access to equipment technology, stars of the circuit, services that only the top teams can afford.

The downside

If it is such a great position to have then what could possibly be the downside of this part of the industry? There is good and bad with every job in the world, just ask someone working in it. In the race or specialty industry the downsides may be hidden, but they are there. Possibly the biggest downfall is home time. Once the circuit is running which for a race driver could last many months then home time is very limited. You drive from one track to the next and that can be clear across the Country. If you need to be home every week then this may not be the job for you. I have a friend that drives in that circuit and lives in my building and I only see him a couple times per year.

The other issue is finding the work in the first place. The carrier management has to have a passion for this type of work to begin with. Normally a company will have more profit running a truck with freight and a driver than a contract on a race circuit so much of the advantage is passion and prestige. Often the race circuit comes to the carrier and then they bid on a position with the team. A team may also have their own equipment and hire or train drivers themselves.

One of the largest issues for most drivers is professionalism. Do you have what it takes to be part of this elite part of the industry. Scruffy jeans and t-shirts won’t cut it in the industry. Attention to detail is particularly important as brand recognition is critical to this part of the industry

So if you think this type of work is for you then you have some hefty goals to work toward, but it can be done. The road starts with skilled and certified training. The TTSAO Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario is a good place to start down that road. You can learn more at www.ttsao.com

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Drive Safely with These Winter Safety Tips!

As we move into December “Old Man Winter” will start to show his ugly side if he hasn’t presented himself already. As a professional driver you have to be ready for winter weather at any time. You leave for a run out West and find yourself into winter storm as you go through the mountains. In fact you don’t even need to be in the mountains, you could be just going through Buffalo.

For many drivers preparing for Winter starts long before the season Snowstormactually gets here. So as a new driver how do you prepare yourself when you haven’t been exposed to winter weather for a few months. The way to combat this is to be prepared all the time. You never know at what time or what trip you will meet Winter for the first time so being prepared is the best defence.

So lets look at a few points to help you get through Winter as safe as possible. Much of these tips may or may not be new to you based on your experience level, tolerance to snow and ice, and the routes you travel.

Be Prepared

I have been saying that since the beginning of this article. But how do you do that? Make sure your truck is well maintained and doing proper inspections may seem like common sense but really is the best defence. A well maintained vehicle operating properly will keep you from breaking down at the side of road and allow you the comfort of getting to a safe place in times of trouble.

Plan to Break Down

I don’t want you to break down of course but planning for it may be the best way to be ready should it happen. Keep extra jackets, blankets, candles, food, water, and other supplies in case you break down for a long period of time. All you have to do is read the news every Winter to see people stuck in snow storms across the country.

Do Proper Trip Planning

Avoiding a Winter storm all together is my first choice for staying safe on the road. Learn about weather patterns and keep a keen eye on weather in your travel area. Know what’s ahead of you on the road so you can plan accordingly.

Know What is Happening on the Road in Front of You

This is a real problem in the industry as people have stopped monitoring the road ahead of them. Just look at social media and you will see countless accidents where people were driving at high rates of speed into road collisions. Don’t be one of those people!

Know Your Tolerance for Winter Driving

Do you get very nervous in snow, do you feel confident when black ice appears, and at what point do you feel you need get off the road? Communication is important here and keeping those lines of communication open with dispatch, customers, and other drivers will save you many headaches when traveling over the Winter months.

There are many more tips for safe driving such as slowing down, leaving more room, and leaving early so you have time to deal with issues. The five tips listed above are basic common sense but have worked well for me over the twenty five years I was on the road and I know they will work for you. Be safe out there!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

A Job in Moving May Be Your Best Training Ground?

Thirty years later I still regard my time in the moving business as the best training I ever received. I am certainly glad that I did it when I was younger as it is not an easy job, but what that job in particular taught me is still being used in my life today.

Work ethic will help you throughout life.

The most important thing I learned was work ethic. I had a strong work ethic from my parents already, but on the moving business people notice when you don’t pull in your fair share of the work. Coworkers that I have seen that don’t pull their weight either get out of the business very quickly or they get a reputation of not working hard and don’t make any money. To get a truck loaded quickly it takes a team effort with a focused goal.

Build your organization with systems.

I am known to be a very organized individual and much of that came from the moving industry. Loading a truck is much like putting a puzzle together. There is a structured system to loading a moving van starting with items like dressers and going down to the garden rake in the garage. Even emptying rooms in the house is done in a systematic way working from the farthest room to the living room. Moving a home also requires you to be very organized as you have to be able to complete the job in a certain amount of time to meet delivery schedules and time frames.

Foundation for business can be found in moving.

One of the biggest areas of training which most people won’t even realize is the business area. The moving business taught me a lot about business and the trucking industry. As a driver for a local moving company I would be paid by the hour while working around the city and out of town work would be paid by percentage. The highway moves were regional such as Ottawa or Montreal and allowed the driver a change of scenery. Paid by percentage meant we were paid a lump sum for the trip and we had to figure out the costs of the trip. If you didn’t manage your costs at the end of the trip you wouldn’t make any money. If you planned it out and negotiated services with your coworkers you could make a profit for each day of the trip. It taught me to negotiate, trip plan, work hard, and the art of making money in the industry.

I learned many things in my years as a professional mover that continue to help me today. Probably the most important thing is that it taught me not to shy away from jobs and positions in the industry just because of the hard work involved. Many of the jobs I have had in my career that involved work above just driving offered me the most opportunities and areas for personal growth. Moving may not be the job for you unless you are young, but is also one of the best ways to get into the industry and as mentioned will offer you training above the driving part of your job which can last you a lifetime.
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

What does a linehaul job entail?

Julie wanted to get into the transportation industry and was told based on her position request that linehaul may be a good fit for her. The problem is she really didn’t know what linehaul meant. Julie had filled out a form for an employment agency that asked her about home time, availability for work, lifestyle and so on. When she completed the form it suggested that she would fit into certain positions better than others based on the information. She was looking for something steady in the industry and linehaul came up. I got a call from the employment agency asking if I could explain it to her. Here is what I explained to Julie on the phone about linehaul work and where to get it.

The first thing I explained is that linehaul work can come in many forms depending on the company, their operation, and travel area. Linehaul work is also normally used by larger carriers such as Fed Ex, UPS, and others that have multiple terminals and need to move freight from one area to another. Smaller companies might hire drivers for linehaul work if they have contracts with larger carriers or customers that need extra power units to keep up with freight demands.
How does Linehaul Work?

Linehaul work is similar to dedicated freight runs. For instance city drivers could pick up freight and bring it to their local terminal. That freight is sorted and loaded onto a larger truck with a driver that would take that freight to another terminal in another city. The freight is then unloaded and sorted for city drivers that will deliver it to the intended destination in their local area. Carriers like UPS and FedEx have complex linehaul lanes that can include trucks, planes, ground crews and more. Linehaul drivers can operate on long highway routes, in regional areas, or within city limits.

The Benefits of Linehaul Work

So what are the benefits of linehaul work? The benefits of linehaul work is that it can be very steady work for the driver, the driver doesn’t have to deal directly with customers, and waiting time can be kept to a minimum. For the carrier it keeps the runs shorter in distance and is an easier way to move freight within the operation. The carrier can set up pre-determined schedules allowing for better customer service.

How Do You Find Linehaul Work?

Linehaul work is more of an operation function than anything else. As mentioned only the larger carriers have linehaul work so applying to a large carrier is the first step. Some carriers may start new people there and other carriers may have the lanes on a bid basis that requires you to apply for the position once hired on to the carrier. Carriers that operate equipment like A-Trains, LCV, or Triple Trailers usually will have linehaul work and you may need additional licences to work in those situations. It really is no different than applying to any carrier however small carriers normally won’t have that type of operation. It is only for carriers with multiple terminals and locations.

To end our conversation I explained to Julie that applying for linehaul work is no different than applying for any other truck driving position. She would just have to apply at the larger carriers with multiple locations. The determining factor as to whether the linehaul work was city or highway would depend on the distance between terminals and the freight demographics of the company. The best chance to get hired by the larger carriers is to get good training and that starts with a certified school. The best place to find a certified school is on the TTSAO website at www.ttsao.com
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

A trucking career is like painting a picture, you need to look at the whole thing!

As an artist when creating a painting it is important to step back once in while and take in the picture as a whole. This is especially true when working with very detailed media such as pen and ink as you can get into the zone as we say and forget to look at how that little area is affecting the rest of the picture.

The same issue happens when you use a GPS and don’t trip plan properly, you get caught up in the details. You watch your trip one turn at a time and forget to look at the whole trip letting you know about that low bridge 300 miles ahead that can stop a truck in its tracks. That’s why many experienced drivers will tell you that map reading is still the best way to trip plan because it allows you to look at the trip as a whole and also view alternative routes offering safer options.

Your career is very similar to the example above in the world of transportation. You have to look at your career as a whole and not just one year or a certain time frame. That’s where many new students coming into the industry go wrong, they look at their career from where they are now and not where they are going. They focus on the training aspect and view their future career within a short window of time. This can cause a disconnect because they could be missing vital opportunities with carriers and future positions.

Just like I do when painting I encourage you to step back from your training and take look at where you want to go in your career. One way to do this is to figure out what you are good at and how it can fit into your career in the future.

Let me show you how this fits into your bigger picture with a short example. I was doing a recruiting event years ago and met a lady that had been laid off from her position as a manager in the United States and was traveling back to Canada. She enjoyed the drive and thought truck driving may be a viable option. She went through the training with a certified school and was quickly hired on with a carrier in the area. After only six months working as a driver for that carrier she was promoted to being a recruiter which is where I met her. She kept that position for a couple of years before leaving to start her own transportation business in her home town. She combined her love of driving, her management skills, and her love of animals to create her own business transporting dogs around the Province.

My tip to many new people to the industry is to just get into the position of driving and take the training seriously. The transportation industry is so complex that you can’t figure it out sitting at a desk in a classroom. You have to get in, get your hands dirty, and do your best at the position you have. Once that is done opportunities will open up to those that are keeping their eyes open and know where they want to go with their careers. If you don’t know where you want to go then it is important to get experience and those details will pop up later on as you gain experience. Figure out what you are good at or enjoy doing and that will go a long way to helping you decide what opportunities you should take down the road. Just like my painting process take stock of your life by stepping back and it will help you create an amazing career in the future.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Check Out These Winter Maintenance Tips Every Driver Should Know!

Want to know why you can’t believe everything you see on television? Television shows are created for entertainment purposes and not factual information for the most part. Most drivers have seen the famous trucking show “Ice Road Truckers” at one point or another. I used to watch it but it got too ridiculous in the crap they were doing, like the episode where the driver had a truck where the heater didn’t work but he was told to go down the road anyway. So you are in Alaska in forty degree below zero and you are going to go trucking with no heat? Are you nuts? It dies however bring up a good point about winter maintenance which is why I started with this story.

Most people don’t think about winter maintenance in their cars ttsao truck at sunsetbecause they are in a local area, but you can’t do that with trucks. Many times you are driving in remote conditions and breaking down could be a matter of life and death. Early in my career we had a Winter where it dropped significantly below zero and everyone froze up on the road. Trucks littered the country at the side of the road. Being prepared certainly helped many drivers in that situation. So what should you do to prepare yourself for trucking in the Winter.

Truck Engine Maintenance

Inspections are one thing, but at the beginning of the Winter some extra checks should be put in place. Lets start with the motor. A winter service should include changing anti-freeze, possibly changing motor oil if required to a better grade for cold conditions. Take an extra look at items like wires and belts and hoses that may crack or break when cold weather sets in. Know your vehicle, cold leaks with diesels are common in the winter and may be hard to find as they are not noticeable at normal operating temperatures. If you are having any issues with your truck in the warmer weather it won’t get any better when the cold weather gets here so prepare properly.

Outer Truck Maintenance

With the outer truck there are a few items that should get extra attention. Tires of course are the important component for outside of the truck. Make sure tread depth, sidewalls, and pressure are all in condition. Brakes are a no brainer but I will mention them here. Look at items like rear end transmission components. Look for any holes in the cab and exhaust system as you will be running the truck much more than in other months. Check fuel, air lines and other under truck components that can cause issues in cold weather. Don’t forget to check, clean, or change batteries if required.

Inner Truck Maintenance

Think of all the things that will affect your driving ability. Mirror heater condition are important as is making sure doors and windows close properly. Checking that the in cab heaters and defrosters are working properly, remember heat is paramount. Safety equipment should always be checked but here is where you need to start preparing for the worst. In addition to your normal bedding throw and extra blanket, winter gloves, food, water, candles, matches, and winter clothing in the truck. Add note paper, pencils for leaving a note if required. What you’re making is a little survival pack in case you break down in a remote area. You may want to put it in a plastic container so things stay clean and can be stored under the bunk for emergencies.
The problem with trucks is that they are mechanical and even new ones break down. It is also common to get stuck in a storm or accident situation while on route so always be prepared for the worst. Hopefully you won’t need to use these items but I don’t think I know one driver that hasn’t had to use these items at on point in their lives. Don’t be a statistic in transportation, be prepared!

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

If it’s sounds too good to be true it may not be for you!

Recently I was teaching a class of new students working on getting into the transportation industry as new drivers and the subject came up about carriers. It still boggles my mind that people spend so much time trying to find the perfect carrier. The reason I find it boggling is that there are really only a handful of carriers that can hire and train new drivers properly so I don”t see the issue. As I have mentioned in previous articles if you choose a reputable carrier you shouldn’t have to worry too much. I find many students that are trying to get the best job out of the gate by cutting each carrier up into segments that often they end up making a bad decision and end up in the wrong environment.

Students may be trying to avoid some work while they make great ttsao truck at sunset largemoney, but the opposite can also be true. What is a deal that sounds too good to be true sound like? A carrier promising you the world with no restrictions, a carrier promising you high wages for no real work, or any variation of this. You know the saying that says, “If it sounds too good to be true it probably is!” For students there is also another issue they need to worry about and that is training.

Many students think because they are in training now that the training ends when they leave the training facility. The truth is you will be in training for the rest of your life. For new students when you get hired on with a carrier you most likely will go through more training with the carrier. Carriers like Challenger, Schneider, and others have formal training programs that are required for a certain time frame and are great for new students. Other carriers may have smaller training programs that are more like an orientation style program, but are still important to bring new people on in a comfortable setting. Anyone under two years of experience can expect to go through some sort of training program with a carrier. The real question, is there compensation for such a program.

As a new student a training program will be part of your first job getting hired on with a carrier. As mentioned the length of the program can vary with different carriers with the normal range being of four to six weeks. As you are new of course you can expect to be paid a lower wage than someone who is experienced and ready to get on the road without training. The reason for this is that the company is using more resources to make the same money upfront. That investment upfront will pay off for the carrier down the road with a qualified and professionally trained driver. That being said you should still expect to be paid for the work you do. Many pay a flat fee for training and that is fine if you know it is for a set amount of time. If you are getting paid a mileage rate for your training it should be close to the industry standard. Most professional companies are within ten cents of the industry rate. If a rate is lower than that then you really need to investigate that company and ask some questions. If a company is paying you mileage for training ask them what happens when you are training in class? Are you paid a flat rate if you are training for dangerous goods or the like?

You may be a new student and new to the industry, but that doesn’t mean you should be abused. Look at the reputable carriers and you will get proper training and have a fulfilling career. A great place to start is on the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario website under affiliate members.

About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

Hauling Produce Can Be Lucrative, But is It For You?

You have possibly heard the saying, “That if you got it a truck brought it!” Nothing is truer in the world of food. Trucks bring us everything from vegetables to meat and much more. Other than the few foods that people grow themselves the rest come from various places across the country depending on the time of year. Truck drivers operating in the world of food transportation can have very lucrative careers but does that mean you as a new driver should jump into that area of the industry?

The produce industry can be a very demanding part of the industry. What draws people to it are the high rates that it can pay to those wishing to dip their toes into this complex area of the transportation. Many new drivers get a false sense of big money, exotic places, and gleaming trucks because thats what they see from those already in the industry. It is not uncommon for owner operators in the industry to be making upwards of four dollars per mile. Produce comes from exotic locations like Florida and California so that attracts those that don’t like the East Coast of the United States. So you may think that the food industry is for you, but I will caution you to do your homework before settling into this area.

From a driver standpoint those same benefits that draw a driver to Truck on highwaythis part of the industry can also make it a huge headache. The high rates we talked about are there for a reason. There is a lot of waiting time in this area of the industry depending on what you haul and I am not just talking about hours, but days in some cases. There are many additional expenses in food transportation from fuel for refrigeration units to off-loading expenses, equipment washouts, and other incidentals. As a driver you may not see the rates we are talking about as many independent owner operators work this area. Length of days away from home also are part of being in the produce industry and those interested should be aware home time can vary greatly.

Am I trying to deter you from a life in the food area of the transportation industry? Of course not, I am just warning you to do your homework and investigate this part of the industry rather than just jumping in to get a job. The industry can be very challenging as far as timelines, dealing with distribution personnel, and equipment issues. I always tell people if you are interested in driving in this area of the industry try and find a carrier that focuses their resources on food transportation. That way you will have better equipment and better options when issues arise.

The largest problem in this area is you the driver. Do you have what it takes to be in this part of the industry? Are you dedicated enough to take the necessary care required for this type of freight? Do you have the organizational judgment to be on time and meet tight restrictions on food entering our Country? Do you have the flexibility for life on the road? If you can handle those issues then you may be a good fit to be a driver in the food industry. Only you will know!
About the Author

Bruce Outridge has been in the transportation industry for over 30 years. He is an author of the books Driven to Drive and Running By The Mile, consultant, podcast host, and speaker. TTSAO also known as the Truck Training Schools Association of Ontario has certified member schools in the truck training vocation ensuring quality entry level drivers enter the transportation industry. To learn more about the TTSAO or to find a certified school in your area visit www.ttsao.com

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